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Old 11-20-2017, 03:43 PM   #15
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Wrapping turbo with a heat wrap turbo cover helps let the turbo cool down more slowly which help the exhaust manifold from cracking or warping. You see them on big boat motors, gen. and HP diesel and gas engines. Also helps keep temp. from getting hot in engine compartment.
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Old 11-20-2017, 04:01 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Deucenut View Post
I agree driving a block or so is sufficient to cool down the turbo. But what about pulling off the interstate into a rest area that is right on the highway? No driving cool down time there.
When you take your foot off the throttle, getting off the highway, the fuel is cut off to the combustion chambers.

At that point, the only thing going thru the engine is lots of cool outside air.

That cooling air is being pulled into one side of the turbo and then getting pumped thru and out the other side. ( Ehxaust Brake off )

Get to a stop, set the brakes, give it a minute while you unbuckle and shut it down.
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Old 11-20-2017, 04:53 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by jarwiebe View Post
I run with the VMSPC and wonder if anyone could tell my on what PID I would find the turbo temp so that when I bring our coach out of hibernation come spring I could setup a simple gauge to show the turbo temp.



Thanks for any info on this.


If you set up a gauge for “intake temp” and “ambient temp” side by side you will have a good indicator of when you have achieved cool down. When the intake temp is within 20-30 degrees of ambient then you are ok to shutdown. Both of those temps are available on the data-buss and is available to VMSPC.
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Old 11-20-2017, 05:41 PM   #18
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Steve, maybe on your Monaco Signature engine, there is a turbo measurement, but I don't believe the Cummins ISL looks at turbo temps. I don't recall, but doesn't your coach have a DD in it. Maybe it looks at turbo temp.

I've been running the Silverleaf VMSpc for about 8 years now and I know there is no way to look at turbo temp in the program. What Cummins does look at on the ISL is the intake manifold temperature. For that reason, I have a VMSpc gauge running that shows the intake temp. It only really climbs on steep grades during the summer. It will also drop off like a rock once the coach is on level ground or I start slowing for a stop like a freeway off ramp. The intake on my 2005 400 ISL used to run almost exactly at 25 degrees above ambient temperature. I could literally tell outside temp form the gauge. My new coach runs much hotter, almost 40+ degrees hotter than outside temp.

I would quit RVing if I had to run out to the rear of the coach and check the turbo temperature every time I stopped the coach. This just isn't needed, neither is a turbo gauge on a modern coach. The only people that need turbo gauges are the guys that are hot rodding their engines, like a lot of the diesel pickup truck owners do. They're pushing the turbo past it's limits and have to be careful they don't melt things down.

I can only think of one situation that would require a cool down time.......you're climbing a steep grade in hot weather and you exit the road at the top of the grade. The coach would still be hot and would require a few minutes of cool down. Other than that, it's pretty commonly believed that just exiting and driving a short distance for fuel or a rest stop is sufficient.
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Old 11-20-2017, 06:16 PM   #19
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As usual, great input from some experienced folks. I think for my purposes the suggestion to keep idling to around 180 F then shut down sounds like a resonable approach. While I only have 16 k on this coach when I bought it I changed the coolant ( AF WITH DISTILLED WATER 50/50) with Cummins additive to set my baseline and with allowing some cooldown to 180 before shutdown I think I may have the issue addressed. Lease pipe in if I am offtrack.
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Old 11-20-2017, 06:17 PM   #20
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Steve, maybe on your Monaco Signature engine, there is a turbo measurement, but I don't believe the Cummins ISL looks at turbo temps. I don't recall, but doesn't your coach have a DD in it. Maybe it looks at turbo temp.

I've been running the Silverleaf VMSpc for about 8 years now and I know there is no way to look at turbo temp in the program. What Cummins does look at on the ISL is the intake manifold temperature. For that reason, I have a VMSpc gauge running that shows the intake temp. It only really climbs on steep grades during the summer. It will also drop off like a rock once the coach is on level ground or I start slowing for a stop like a freeway off ramp. The intake on my 2005 400 ISL used to run almost exactly at 25 degrees above ambient temperature. I could literally tell outside temp form the gauge. My new coach runs much hotter, almost 40+ degrees hotter than outside temp.

I would quit RVing if I had to run out to the rear of the coach and check the turbo temperature every time I stopped the coach. This just isn't needed, neither is a turbo gauge on a modern coach. The only people that need turbo gauges are the guys that are hot rodding their engines, like a lot of the diesel pickup truck owners do. They're pushing the turbo past it's limits and have to be careful they don't melt things down.

I can only think of one situation that would require a cool down time.......you're climbing a steep grade in hot weather and you exit the road at the top of the grade. The coach would still be hot and would require a few minutes of cool down. Other than that, it's pretty commonly believed that just exiting and driving a short distance for fuel or a rest stop is sufficient.


We are talking about the same temp point. You are correct, Cummins doesn’t look at turbo or exhaust temps. I think that they control those temps with their fuel Delivery. I’ve always looked at the intake temp when coming off a hard climb. It’s doesn’t take much time for the intake temp to drop down to within 20 degrees of ambient.
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Old 11-20-2017, 10:42 PM   #21
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Yes, my intake temp comes down as fast as it goes up.
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Old 11-20-2017, 11:30 PM   #22
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If you run in mountainous regions and worry about "Coking", use 100% synthetic oil. This will also help in an emergency shutdown whether manually or automatically engaged. A sudden fuel supply stoppage during a long hot grade climb can cost you more than just a new fuel filter or a fuel fill. Syn oil may well keep such an event just an annoying incident rather than a catastrophic engine failure.

Unfortunately stuff happens!

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Old 11-21-2017, 12:43 AM   #23
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Turbo Cool Down

The purpose of allowing your Turbo Diesel to cool down is there is no mechanical link in your engine and the Turbo. The Turbine is powered by the exhaust exiting through the exhaust system. Turbo's will actually run almost to 100,000 Revolutions Per Minute (RPM). The bearing's are fed by oil and as long as the engine is running the oil is flowing and the bearings are lubricated. You will reduce the life of those bearing's by just shutting down your motor without letting it cool down. The turbine speed takes a while to slow down and actually stop turning. The harder you have been pushing it the longer the cool down should be. Up to 5 minutes should be sufficient even at full temperature. Not many of us have the ability to measure our Exhaust Gas Temperatures but it is safe to assume that it runs about 1000 degrees+/- a few. Slightly lower when not climbing. And much lower coasting and idling. Yes, synthetic oil does help. I am willing to expend the extra few minutes letting mine idle down. Good luck and God bless
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Old 11-21-2017, 05:46 AM   #24
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This is from the Cummins "Recreational Vehicle - ISL9 Series Diesel Maintenance and Operation" quick reference guide passed out in Sedalia.

Engine Cooldown
Prior to shutdown, an engine should be idled 3-5 minutes after extended full throttle or high power operation. However, under normal driving conditions, such as exiting a highway, engine operation is lighter in nature and thereby, the 3-5 minute cooldown is not necessary.
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Old 11-21-2017, 08:13 AM   #25
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The purpose of allowing your Turbo Diesel to cool down is there is no mechanical link in your engine and the Turbo. The Turbine is powered by the exhaust exiting through the exhaust system. Turbo's will actually run almost to 100,000 Revolutions Per Minute (RPM). The bearing's are fed by oil and as long as the engine is running the oil is flowing and the bearings are lubricated. You will reduce the life of those bearing's by just shutting down your motor without letting it cool down. The turbine speed takes a while to slow down and actually stop turning. The harder you have been pushing it the longer the cool down should be. Up to 5 minutes should be sufficient even at full temperature. Not many of us have the ability to measure our Exhaust Gas Temperatures but it is safe to assume that it runs about 1000 degrees+/- a few. Slightly lower when not climbing. And much lower coasting and idling. Yes, synthetic oil does help. I am willing to expend the extra few minutes letting mine idle down. Good luck and God bless
I totally agree with this! For the amount of actual time it takes and the miniscule cost of fuel to run for 3-5 mins, why not do it? I for one don't want the $5-10000 bill to have to replace my turbo because I'm too lazy to wait 3 minutes after coming straight off the freeway. Just my opinion. And as someone else said above, it is my coach, so I will do what I believe is best. For those that say idling that 3-5 mins is going to plug the DPF, well I disagree with that too since it's on high idle.


My dad has a Cat 3126 in his motorhome. He installed a pyrometer gauge and when climbing hills, he can literally watch the gauge climb. He almost always keeps it out of the red and in the yellow or green area(it does have temp markings too but I can't remember what their numbers are). Everyone once in a while, he hits a steep grade and can only gear down so much before he has to just put his foot into it and it will go into the red. Those EGT can reach 1500+ so what do you think the turbo temp is? Even if he were to shut it down with it in the yellow, he would be slowly damaging the turbo every time till it eventually just ground to a halt.
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Old 11-21-2017, 10:46 AM   #26
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In case anyone is interested monitoring their EGT, it isn't that difficult to install a system to do that. Adding that and a tach were the first things I did to our first gen Dodge Cummins. I bought mine from Isspro, but I would imagine there are others available.

The installation consisted of drilling a hole in the exhaust just past the turbo, I think within 7 inches of the turbo, and welding the sensor in there. Then wires run from it to a gauge in the cockpit where the EGT can be easily monitored and there is no more "guesswork" involved.

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Old 11-22-2017, 10:02 AM   #27
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I realize this is not a motor home with a big engine but it is an oil and water cooled turbo and this is what is in the manual cut and paste for my cummins 6.7 in my Ram

Driving Condition Load Turbo Temp Idle Time(min.) Before Engine shutdown
Stop and Go Empty Cool Less than One
Stop and Go Medium - One
Highway Speeds Medium Warm Two
City Traffic Max GCWR- Three
Highway Speeds Max GCWR- Four
Uphill Grade Max GCWR Hot Five
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Old 11-28-2017, 07:33 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by ptw View Post
This is from the Cummins "Recreational Vehicle - ISL9 Series Diesel Maintenance and Operation" quick reference guide passed out in Sedalia.

Engine Cooldown
Prior to shutdown, an engine should be idled 3-5 minutes after extended full throttle or high power operation. However, under normal driving conditions, such as exiting a highway, engine operation is lighter in nature and thereby, the 3-5 minute cooldown is not necessary.
The Cummins ISL engine manual for my 2005 370hp ISL says the same thing but does not have the line about being not necessary with lighter operation.

I also use the VMSpc and I also have no input for any turbo temps or EGT temps available.

I use the intake air temperature and the coolant temps to determine how hot the engine is. Will usually let it idle till intake temp is under 120, coolant is usually around 180.

Manual also mentions letting engine idle for 3-5 minutes before operating with a load.

Not sure what the OP has for a coach as I didn't see it mentioned.

I have a diesel pick up and have an EGT on it, with the sensor mounted in the exhaust manifold. Installed it to make sure it wasn't getting too hot. Have had it over 1200 deg, dropping a gear will get more air flowing through and temp will drop 200 deg fairly quick.

Would always idle truck below 400 before shut down.
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