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Old 08-29-2014, 02:38 PM   #1
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Bio-diesel

I have a '99 coach with a Cummins engine and I see that I can only use up to B7 bio-diesel fuel. That blend, or lower, is almost impossible to find. What are the consequence of using a higher blend? What engines parts are subject to failure using a higher blend? It appears finding regular diesel fuel, at least at major truck stops is getting more difficult.

All help will be greatly appreciated.


Thanks,

Greg
'99 Alpine Coach
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Old 08-29-2014, 03:15 PM   #2
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The difference between B 7 and B 10 is only 3%. Cummins only specifies engines after 2002 because prior years MIGHT have components that wouldn't be compatible with biodiesel.
In general, biodiesel provides more lubrication than petro-diesel. It can also clean injectors and the fuel system. Some blends provide a little less energy than petro-diesel. (less MPG) In low temperatures, biodiesel might gel faster and I try to only use in summer.
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Old 08-29-2014, 06:00 PM   #3
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I always add a 16oz bottle of Stanadyne Performance Additive when I fill up.
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Old 08-31-2014, 11:20 AM   #4
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Stanadyne is great but expensive. Truckers use Power Service Fuel Treatment with the red cap, found at Wal-Mart, and auto parts stores. It's around 9 dollars a bottle, which treats 100 gallons of fuel. The recommended way to treat diesel is as follows:
1. If going into storage, fill up the tank and treat the fuel tank with treatment, Take coach out once a month and run it 25 miles one way to circulate fluids and drive moisture out of oil.
2. If traveling and only staying over 2-5 nights between stops then, fill up prior to going into overnight spots and then every third fill up treat fuel tank.
3. If laying over for 3 weeks or longer, then fill tank and treat fuel going INTO the layover spot. Then the second tank after leaving treat fuel and go back to #1 suggestion above.

Biodiesel gels at significantly higher temps, at or around 32F, so if heading into nights where it's cold, treat fuel. Some stations don't convert to #2 diesel at the first sign of cold weather, you must be proactive about knowing weather conditions. I just use the above formula regardless of outside temps and I'm covered in all situations.
Had friend who had gelling problems in TX last winter, I came through and because of above never had problems he had. Pilot/FJ stations are more proactive about treating fuel and keeping it in good shape, Loves does not seem to be as proactive, at least the station he got his fuel at did not treat until Mid November, and TX was socked in cold long before that. Pilot/FJ also have great credit card for which will save you $ off the cost of fuel, they are usually all over the place, you can download a system wide map. When I worked on construction crew the rule for our vehicles was the tank never went below 1/2 empty, and on Friday's we filled everything up, in case of emergency call out. So regardless I fill up my fuel tank each evening prior to stopping unless is above the 3/4 full mark. just my two cents worth.
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Old 09-03-2014, 01:07 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Rv'er View Post
Stanadyne is great but expensive. Truckers use Power Service Fuel Treatment with the red cap, found at Wal-Mart, and auto parts stores. It's around 9 dollars a bottle, which treats 100 gallons of fuel. The recommended way to treat diesel is as follows:
1. If going into storage, fill up the tank and treat the fuel tank with treatment, Take coach out once a month and run it 25 miles one way to circulate fluids and drive moisture out of oil.
2. If traveling and only staying over 2-5 nights between stops then, fill up prior to going into overnight spots and then every third fill up treat fuel tank.
3. If laying over for 3 weeks or longer, then fill tank and treat fuel going INTO the layover spot. Then the second tank after leaving treat fuel and go back to #1 suggestion above.

Biodiesel gels at significantly higher temps, at or around 32F, so if heading into nights where it's cold, treat fuel. Some stations don't convert to #2 diesel at the first sign of cold weather, you must be proactive about knowing weather conditions. I just use the above formula regardless of outside temps and I'm covered in all situations.
Had friend who had gelling problems in TX last winter, I came through and because of above never had problems he had. Pilot/FJ stations are more proactive about treating fuel and keeping it in good shape, Loves does not seem to be as proactive, at least the station he got his fuel at did not treat until Mid November, and TX was socked in cold long before that. Pilot/FJ also have great credit card for which will save you $ off the cost of fuel, they are usually all over the place, you can download a system wide map. When I worked on construction crew the rule for our vehicles was the tank never went below 1/2 empty, and on Friday's we filled everything up, in case of emergency call out. So regardless I fill up my fuel tank each evening prior to stopping unless is above the 3/4 full mark. just my two cents worth.

I was a Power Service distributor years ago. Nice additive to prevent waxing, but it is mostly alcohol..........
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Old 09-04-2014, 12:54 AM   #6
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Greg- I did call Cummins Coach Care a few years back and they said you could run up to B 20 ok. To be sure I would call Cummins Care@ 1-800 DIESELS or 1-800-343-7357.

If you never have run Bio diesel in your motorhome before, you will find out it does a very good job of cleaning out your fuel tank. You may want to watch your fuel filters, and carry spare ones. When I got my M/H in 2010, when I brought in from out state to Oregon and it had never used biodiesel before, I went through several filters, until I got the tank cleaned out.

There several good additives available. I did go to a fleet managers forum several years ago in Oregon. Every one of them had algae problems in their diesel storage tanks with biodiesel. They all used treatments in their biodiesel storage tanks. One of them recommended Power Service Diesel Kleene, which is available at Walmart and Truck Stops. I have used it for almost 5 years with no problems.

Ever since I had to start using Biodiesel, I quit filling my tank up before storage. I would just as soon put fresh fuel in when, I go to use it.
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