RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > THE OWNER'S CORNER FORUMS > Alpine Coach Owner's Forum
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-21-2018, 05:36 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 78
Bio Diesel

All the truck stops I pull into only offer Bio Diesel so I have to battle the traffic at the auto pumps which is #2 Diesel. Any body know if I can use Bio Diesel in and older Cummins engine circa 1998? Its a 325hp 6CTA 8.3L
__________________

TheKassman is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-21-2018, 06:02 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 19,102
Is it pure biodiesel or B5 or B20? It won't damage your engine, or they wouldn't be selling it to trucks. B100 (100%) biodiesel is much more expensive than a blend of fossil (dino) diesel and biodiesel. You'll hear horror stories of folks getting contaminated biodiesel fuel and all sorts of tall tales. I've never had an issue with any blend typically sold at most pumps for 20 years. When sulfur was reduced from diesel fuel, the fuel lost some of its lubricity properties. Components of diesel engines use the fuel as a lubricant. Biodiesel actually adds lubricating properties to the fuel, so it means less need for additives.
__________________

__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2018, 09:38 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 662
Per Cummins, you can run up to B20. The engine will run hotter, make less power and get fewer mpg. If used on a regular basis they advise changing fuel filters as well as oil and oil filter every 6-8 months rather than annually. It is not the same as #2.



Keep an eye on the condition of your coolant as well.
__________________
2005 Alpine Coach 36MDDS
2015 Grand Cherokee Diesel
RVPioneer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2018, 11:27 PM   #4
Cat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 654
Bio fuel shouldn't sit more than 6 Months before using it, temperature and humidity and the quality of the bio will affect life, and its more prone grow algae and bacteria. In cold weather it is much more likely to gel.
Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 09:00 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 19,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat View Post
Bio fuel shouldn't sit more than 6 Months before using it, temperature and humidity and the quality of the bio will affect life, and its more prone grow algae and bacteria. In cold weather it is much more likely to gel.
Buying from a high volume station prevents this. Most cold weather stations sell winter blends that reduce chances of gelling. I've never experienced it in even subzero weather starts. The issue happens more often if an RV fills up in a southern station then travels with that fuel to a colder climate. Same thing can happen with LP, they use different blends in different climates.
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 09:22 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
PJStough's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by RVPioneer View Post
Per Cummins, you can run up to B20. The engine will run hotter...

Do you know why the engine would run hotter with B20 than with straight dino diesel?


Thanks
__________________
Paul & Ann Iowa
2005 Winnebago Voyage 38J
http://stoughrvadventure.blogspot.com/
PJStough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 09:25 AM   #7
Cat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by BFlinn181 View Post
Buying from a high volume station prevents this. Most cold weather stations sell winter blends that reduce chances of gelling. I've never experienced it in even subzero weather starts. The issue happens more often if an RV fills up in a southern station then travels with that fuel to a colder climate. Same thing can happen with LP, they use different blends in different climates.
Buying from high volume certainly helps, but that doesn't help if you buy a tank of bio diesel and then the motor/trucks sits for long periods of time. The bio fuel is more hygroscopic than regular diesel. Nothing wrong with wrong with bio, but if my MH is going to sit for a period of time, I would make sure its full of regular diesel.
Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 10:18 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 19,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat View Post
Buying from high volume certainly helps, but that doesn't help if you buy a tank of bio diesel and then the motor/trucks sits for long periods of time. The bio fuel is more hygroscopic than regular diesel. Nothing wrong with wrong with bio, but if my MH is going to sit for a period of time, I would make sure its full of regular diesel.
You could just add a biocide to the tank when the RV is stored. I do it to my small gas engines stored over winter. (STA-BIL, not a biocide)
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 11:06 AM   #9
Cat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJStough View Post
Do you know why the engine would run hotter with B20 than with straight dino diesel?


Thanks
No I don't. I had not heard of temperature differences. Does the engine seem to lug, climb hills at a lower engine RPM, if so that might contribute to the heat loads.
Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 11:12 AM   #10
Cat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by BFlinn181 View Post
You could just add a biocide to the tank when the RV is stored. I do it to my small gas engines stored over winter. (STA-BIL, not a biocide)
Good point. And if you have bio in your tank it be a very smart move to add a biocide. Biocides sometimes can difficult to find and purchase--- truck stops might sell them though.
Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 11:18 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 19,102
Low sulfur diesel = 138,490 Btu/gal
B100 biodiesel = 127,960 Btu/gal

That's a 7% change, and that's for diesel vs B100 biodiesel. I don't think you'd notice any difference in B20 and dino diesel.

from: https://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/fu...ison_chart.pdf
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 07:47 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 662
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJStough View Post
Do you know why the engine would run hotter with B20 than with straight dino diesel?


Thanks

Nope. Call Cummins.



I'll go with their information and recommendations rather than make assumptions about what it may or may not do.
__________________
2005 Alpine Coach 36MDDS
2015 Grand Cherokee Diesel
RVPioneer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 08:52 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
DrDaveMA's Avatar


 
Alpine Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Cotuit, MA
Posts: 2,519
While I am nowhere near an expert, or even very knowledgeable but I have heard that there are different lubricant additives in bio vs Dino. I am thinking those differences could explain different operating temperatures. But as suggested it is best to reach out To Cummins.
__________________
Dave, Bobbi and Fenway
2005 38' FDTS Alpine Limited, 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited
Cape Cod, MA
DrDaveMA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2018, 09:02 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: FULL TIMERS
Posts: 1,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJStough View Post
Do you know why the engine would run hotter with B20 than with straight dino diesel?


Thanks
...


Engine temperature should be controlled by the cooling system thermostate, not the fuel.
__________________

grindstone01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diesel



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
B20 Bio Diesel VS. Diesel #2 Stiltner Freightliner Motorhome Chassis Forum 37 04-20-2018 06:47 PM
Bio-Diesel pricing Tom N MH-General Discussions & Problems 6 05-19-2008 06:18 PM
Opinions on BIO Diesel RSmoak Trailer Towing and Tow Vehicles Discussion 12 04-30-2006 01:16 PM
Make my own Bio-diesel fuel.?? BigBob iRV2.com General Discussion 7 09-01-2005 06:39 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.