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Old 08-27-2008, 12:59 PM   #15
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I have had Kumhos on my coach for about 2 yr. and would certainly buy them again. I think you will find they are used in the trucking industry much more than you might at first suspect. I have seen many trucks using them. I paid about $320 each which included installation.
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Old 08-27-2008, 08:30 PM   #16
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Our APEX has the Goodyear G670's and when it becomes necessary to replace them, I will either use GY or Michelin. I have never had a bad Michelin tire, and have been using them for 35 years. Someone in another tire post thread, said the GY's have more chemical in the rubber to prevent them from being as effected by sunlight and ozone. I don't know this to be fact, but my life is running on those tires, and it's way more important than the amount of money I pay for them.

FWIW - Price Costco will order the Goodyear or Michelin tires for you, they just will not put them on. So save yourself some money if possible, buy them in Montana or Oregon, where there is no sales tax, and find a good shop to install them. At work we use Superior Tire Service in Portland, OR, but they have other outlets in other cities.
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Old 09-01-2008, 09:30 PM   #17
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I was thinking this thread has been sewn before and as a result we found Pete's Road Service. They were WAY cheaper than everyone else, throughout Southern California. They carry all the discussed brands.

My second choice on pricing and FIRST on customer service is Redlands. They are definitely experts on everything related to tires. I just wish they were not quite so pricey. I guess everyone has to make a living.
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Old 09-02-2008, 07:09 AM   #18
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TheMcDonald3:

In line with Algoma's comments on why Toyos were not recommended for RVs, our coach has the M120Z's in 11R-22.5, which was a standard tire for WRV for some time, including ours in the 2006 model year. During that year, the issues with Country Coaches came about, Toyo visited with WRV and told them they didn't want to make tires for RVs and wanted WRV to inform owners to keep the air pressure at 120 psi in the front and 110 in the rear. I received a letter on that from WRV and specifically talked to WRV (Mike Glazier) about it.

WRV then switched tires to the Goodyear GS670s during the 2006 model year, which is why some 2006's, like mine, have the Toyos, and why some 2006's and later models have the Goodyears.

Toyo may well have changed their views on tires, or perhaps have no problems on the M124z versions. But what I described is the scenario that happened after we bought our coach, on the 11R-22.5 Toyo tires.
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Old 09-02-2008, 08:20 AM   #19
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Consider me the guy who forgets that others have a history and knowledge that probably outways my own. Especially, since I'm new to Alpines. Anyways, I'll be more inclined to sit on the sidelines and soak in the information more often.
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Old 09-09-2008, 11:00 AM   #20
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Has anyone used the tire balance rings with success?
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Old 09-09-2008, 07:39 PM   #21
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Balance rings (Centramatics) work very well if your tires are round and installed properly on the wheels. Too many times the tires are not seated properly on the wheels and nothing will cause them to run smoothly. Tires should never be aired up at the dealer while standing up (most dealers make the mistake of doing this). The weight of the wheel pushing down will keep the tires from seating straight. Make sure they lay the wheel on a bucket so there is no off center weight on the tire. Air the tire to max pressure than let the air out until the tire starts to pull away from the wheel. Then air it back up to the pressure you want to run. Normally your tires will be true at this point. If it takes over 8 oz. to balance there is something wrong. You should not accept the tires if they don't balance properly.
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Old 09-09-2008, 07:54 PM   #22
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Kumho tires are used by alot of large semi-trucks. Truck tires get alot of abuse that motor home tires don't. They are subjected to worn out front ends, bad wheels, bad rear suspensions, trailer hop, etc. Most motorhomers do not wear out their tires but end up pulling them off due to age. Why pay more than you need to. BF Goodrich is another excellent choice. It has Michelin technology (BFG is owned by Michelin). The new Goodyear 670 RV work very well bur are expensive. They have designed the tire to have very soft tread compound so the tread does not outwear the casing. Because it is soft it does give great traction. Question is, when you will remove any tire at 5 years should you spend more than you need to to get good performance and safety.
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Old 09-10-2008, 01:14 AM   #23
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 2golfers:
Balance rings (Centramatics) work very well if your tires are round and installed properly on the wheels. Too many times the tires are not seated properly on the wheels and nothing will cause them to run smoothly. Tires should never be aired up at the dealer while standing up (most dealers make the mistake of doing this). The weight of the wheel pushing down will keep the tires from seating straight. Make sure they lay the wheel on a bucket so there is no off center weight on the tire. Air the tire to max pressure than let the air out until the tire starts to pull away from the wheel. Then air it back up to the pressure you want to run. Normally your tires will be true at this point. If it takes over 8 oz. to balance there is something wrong. You should not accept the tires if they don't balance properly. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That is a problem at some dealers as tire safety cages which are required by law when seating/inflating high pressure tires on a rim after mounting/remounting are vertical at many shops that I have been to.
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Old 09-10-2008, 07:55 AM   #24
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeilV:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 2golfers:
Balance rings (Centramatics) work very well if your tires are round and installed properly on the wheels. Too many times the tires are not seated properly on the wheels and nothing will cause them to run smoothly. Tires should never be aired up at the dealer while standing up (most dealers make the mistake of doing this). The weight of the wheel pushing down will keep the tires from seating straight. Make sure they lay the wheel on a bucket so there is no off center weight on the tire. Air the tire to max pressure than let the air out until the tire starts to pull away from the wheel. Then air it back up to the pressure you want to run. Normally your tires will be true at this point. If it takes over 8 oz. to balance there is something wrong. You should not accept the tires if they don't balance properly. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That is a problem at some dealers as tire safety cages which are required by law when seating/inflating high pressure tires on a rim after mounting/remounting are vertical at many shops that I have been to. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


I'm just taking a stab at this, because I used to align front ends. The tire cage we used was for the "split ring" rims. You know, the old 16.5" rims w/ the split ring around the outside of the rim. I'm outta the loop now, so it's just a guess on my part. Robbie
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Old 09-10-2008, 07:57 AM   #25
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I'm in the process of replacing all 6 tires for the second time since we bought our RV in January, 2004. Then, after reading the forums and starting to look at the tires that we had, I decided that the risks of trying to get more miles out of tires with significant checking on the sidewalls of all outside tires were just not worth it. The original tires (Michelin XRVs) had DOT codes consistent the the chassis manufacture date of Summer, 1999. The new set, with 3 date codes of 0404 and 3 of 3503 were installed on February 27, 2004. They were again Michelin XRVs. BTW, the original owner had put about 24K miles the first set.

Now, I have 30K miles on the second set. After our recent trip, I noticed a depression in the sidewall of our passenger side front tire. A similar depression is not on any other tire. In addition, you can see the checking starting around the depression.

This week, I ordered another set of XRVs and expect to have them installed in the next few weeks. I had hoped that I could get through to the 5 year mark but decided that the risks just weren't worth it to me.

In my judgment, having two sets of tires that performed flawlessly for 4.5 years each in their application is more than justification to repeat the same choice. My reasoning is simple: the odds of continued good performance go up with the tire replacement and the costs of a failure could significantly outweigh any savings. If I get 4.5 years out of the new set, in the same way as the two previous ones, I'll be thrilled.

I pay a lot more than a few hundred dollars per year in insurance policies. I view the difference between the Michelins and other choices that I could make as simply another insurance policy. Only time will tell if it is as good a policy as the previous ones.
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Old 09-10-2008, 07:43 PM   #26
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I don't understand tires not lasting for the length of the warranty. I bought GY & they have a 5 year warranty. The ones I took off the rear were 8-1/2 years old & not a crack or bad spot in them inside or out. I had a blowout on one of the front tires that were replaced earlier & it was 3 years old & Gy took care of it & sent a check. If my tires were cracking at 4.5 years I sure would have the manufacturer take a look at them & want to know why they didn't hold up.
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Old 09-10-2008, 07:52 PM   #27
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The tires that I have may well last until 8 years - I'm just not willing to take that chance. There is clearly checking on one of them in the sidewall area. Call me paranoid but I'm not going to take the chance that it is a serious problem. I'm not sure that anyone, including the manufacturer can confirm that. I toyed with just replacing the steering axle tires and then decided that I'd simply go for all 6 - my choice.

I have never had a blowout, the previous owner didn't either and I want to do my best to keep it that way. If that means replacing the tires every 4.5 years, I'm fine with that. I've already been told that I'll get an adjustment for any problems in the warranty. Frankly, however, I'm not expecting much.
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Old 09-18-2008, 03:34 PM   #28
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One person mentioned the UV chemicals. This is true, RV specific tires from Goodyear and Michelin have more UV protection in the sidewalls, because RV tires fail more frequently from age and sun than from wear.

In addition, some less popular brands are not being used by many manufacturers because they are not readily available throughout North America. If you have an early failure with one tire, and you cannot get the same tire, you could end up with mis-matched tires.
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