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Old 06-10-2010, 08:15 PM   #15
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I had Les Schwab in Bend install new Goodyear G670's last year. Great service and price. At the time they installed Equal and I have been extremely pleased with the results..........very smooth and vibration free. Go figure.
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Old 06-17-2010, 10:16 PM   #16
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If you're putting on the Bridgestones, why not R250's in 295/80R22.5? That's what I changed to in our 2006 36MDDS and we really like them. There's no perceptable difference in the speedo (I've checked it on a lot of freeway check miles and it's very close to right on), and with its wide profile design I think they have a higher load rating and you can go with lower tire pressures and have a more comfortable ride. You will find them to be a very long life tire. Ours sure improved when I lowered the tire pressure from our 11R22.5 Toyos at 120 psi in the front and 110 in the rear to 105 front, 90 to 95 rear.

Also, we had our tires siped when they were installed and had a good chance to test them in black ice last winter in the Willamette Valley. I would highly recommend it for traction and reduced tire temps. Our tires run cooler than the Toyos did at the same temperature, based on our SmartTire readings.
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Old 06-17-2010, 10:26 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldForester View Post
If you're putting on the Bridgestones, why not R250's in 295/80R22.5? That's what I changed to in our 2006 36MDDS and we really like them. There's no perceptable difference in the speedo (I've checked it on a lot of freeway check miles and it's very close to right on), and with its wide profile design I think they have a higher load rating and you can go with lower tire pressures and have a more comfortable ride. You will find them to be a very long life tire. Ours sure improved when I lowered the tire pressure from our 11R22.5 Toyos at 120 psi in the front and 110 in the rear to 105 front, 90 to 95 rear.

Also, we had our tires siped when they were installed and had a good chance to test them in black ice last winter in the Willamette Valley. I would highly recommend it for traction and reduced tire temps. Our tires run cooler than the Toyos did at the same temperature, based on our SmartTire readings.
I put on the Bridgestone R250 ED's and am very happy with them. Nice price, too, $2586 out the with tax, alignment and balancing.
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Old 06-19-2010, 12:02 AM   #18
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I too am in the market to replace my tires and, in the Phoenix area, the R250 Bridgestones seem to be the best price. About $2240 out the door for six 295/75R22.5 load range G mounted and balanced. I weighed my coach and it is about 10400 lbs. on the steer axle with about 5400 lbs on the driver side and 5000 lbs on the left side. It was just under 17000 lbs on the rear and once again a little heavier on the driver side. The load range G would certainly meet my needs. At 110psi it is rated at about 6175 lbs on a single tire and 5800 on the duals. I thought about going to the heavier load range H tire, but the tire shop thought I would get a much harder ride because of the 16 ply tire and lowering the pressure in the tire would not do much to soften the ride. Does anyone have any experience going with the higher load rating and lowering the air pressure. What effect would lower air pressure have on fuel mileage and heat build up in the tire? They also nixed the 295/80R22.5 as it is not as common a tire size and if you blow one in the middle of nowhere you might have to wait a few days to get one. The 11R and 295/75R are very common and any shop will probably have them.
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Old 06-19-2010, 12:35 AM   #19
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I thought about going to the heavier load range H tire, but the tire shop thought I would get a much harder ride because of the 16 ply tire and lowering the pressure in the tire would not do much to soften the ride. .
Your tire guy is wrong. Have him look at the Bridgestone charts. You will notice a separate line for the R280 H LR. This is a euro spec rating and you will see that the tire does actually (in this case) carry more at less psi.

BUT, in MOST instances, the SAME SIZE higher load range tire, H, WILL NOT carry more weight at a lower pressure than the G. Again, in MOST cases the G at 100 PSI and the H at 100 psi will carry the same load. There are variables, and it is a result of the standard of measure (again most cases). So, an H rated tires scales more weight because the tire will hold more air pressure...120psi. vs 110 psi..

What would allow you to lower your psi for a given weight would be a larger tire. The larger tire gives you a bigger envelope of air, hence you could lower air pressure.

IMHO Hax, your inflation for the front axle (your heaviest side is 5400#) should be at least 95 psi which will scale 5510 each. I add 5 psi to my tires.

But please check with your tire expert to determine the proper psi.

My Bridgestone 295/75R22.5 R260's LR G are run at 95 psi front and 85 rear.
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Old 06-19-2010, 04:48 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hax View Post
I too am in the market to replace my tires and, in the Phoenix area, the R250 Bridgestones seem to be the best price. About $2240 out the door for six 295/75R22.5 load range G mounted and balanced. I weighed my coach and it is about 10400 lbs. on the steer axle with about 5400 lbs on the driver side and 5000 lbs on the left side. It was just under 17000 lbs on the rear and once again a little heavier on the driver side. The load range G would certainly meet my needs. At 110psi it is rated at about 6175 lbs on a single tire and 5800 on the duals. I thought about going to the heavier load range H tire, but the tire shop thought I would get a much harder ride because of the 16 ply tire and lowering the pressure in the tire would not do much to soften the ride. Does anyone have any experience going with the higher load rating and lowering the air pressure. What effect would lower air pressure have on fuel mileage and heat build up in the tire? They also nixed the 295/80R22.5 as it is not as common a tire size and if you blow one in the middle of nowhere you might have to wait a few days to get one. The 11R and 295/75R are very common and any shop will probably have them.
The Bridgestone R250 ED is an H rated 16 ply tire. That's what I just put on. After 2500 miles, couldn't be happier. (The ED stands for extra duty). I just put the basic 11R22.5 size on mine (same size as OEM). I am running mine at 95 psi in the front and 90 psi in the back, per inflation table based on weight. The ride was very good. No noticeable difference in fuel economy but then I ran my Toyo's at the same inflation so I wouldn't expect to see a change there. The H rated tire is probably only about $40-50 more per tire.
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Old 06-19-2010, 10:25 AM   #21
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I'm in agreement with Tom and Patty. Your tire guy is wrong. My 295/80 Bridgestones also run about 10 -15 degrees cooler than the Toyo 11R22.5's did, according to my Smarttire system. On a 90 degree day at 60 mph the Toyos used to run about 130 to 140 degrees, depending on the tire (Driver front and inside passenger dual always hotter, with more weight on those tires). The Bridgestones (which are more like 100 psi in front and 90 in rear, rather than 105 and 95 as I said earlier), fun about 120 to 125 degrees at the same temperature and speed.

I think it's a combination of different tire profile and lower air pressure, plus I had the Bridgestones siped when they were installed, which increases traction, mileage and provides a little more tire cooling.

I keep a log of every gallon of fuel I put in the coach and miles at fill, and with my old Toyos for the first 32,000 miles I averaged 7.56 mpg, and with the new Bridgestones and 9,000 mile since I have averaged 7.76 mpg, factoring in the generator hours used at 0.5 gallons an hour. (Now have about 276 hours on the generator).

So the bigger Bridgestones, based on my data, ride substantially softer, run cooler, and get better fuel mileage than the old Toyos.
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