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Old 12-01-2010, 01:32 PM   #1
hax
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Roof Repair

My coach was the recipient of a "hail of a beating". The hail stones put two holes in the roof and about 3 dozen star crack patterns in the roof fiberglass where it rolls over the edge. Not to mention wiping out the TV antenna, motostat, skylights, covers. air horns, toppers and AC units.
The repair shop wants to patch the two big holes and then put on a new rubber roof over the existing starred fiberglass. I couldn't talk the repair shop into tearing off the existing fiberglass and putting a new piece of fiberglass on the roof. The labor to repair each impact spot might be too excessive.
Does anyone have any thoughts on rubber roofs and using this method to repair the damage?
Thanks
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Old 12-01-2010, 06:27 PM   #2
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First, let me say that I've no qualification to speak to this issue. That said, I would find an autobody shop that has some folks with fiberglass experience and have them take a look and offer an opinion. I've had to have some work on the DS rear fiberglass panel done. They were able to put the old pieces together so you would never know it was broken.
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Old 12-02-2010, 12:06 AM   #3
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hax:

I would force the issue of keeping it all fiberglass. The quickest repair after so much damage would be to overlay the entire roof with a sheet of fiberglass (not rubber), covering all the damage and then installing all new parts in the appropriate openings. It would be much quicker, saving huge amounts of labor and thereby, expenses.

This is the same technique used to repair and reinforce fiberglass roofs that start to crack over the top of the roof joists, as mentioned in earlier threads.
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Old 12-02-2010, 12:17 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by takepride View Post
hax:

I would force the issue of keeping it all fiberglass. The quickest repair after so much damage would be to overlay the entire roof with a sheet of fiberglass (not rubber), covering all the damage and then installing all new parts in the appropriate openings. It would be much quicker, saving huge amounts of labor and thereby, expenses.

This is the same technique used to repair and reinforce fiberglass roofs that start to crack over the top of the roof joists, as mentioned in earlier threads.
I would agree... The best thing to do is to bond a full layer to the existing roof. This would be the strongest and most leak proof way. It would also, ironically, prolly be the quickest way. I would have a qualified fiberglass shop acually do the work as proper prep is absolutely essential for proper bonding. Roll of lightweight cloth called 'Bid' and a Vinyl Ester resin would be the way to go.
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Old 12-29-2010, 09:39 PM   #5
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Rubber----Stay away from rubber. If you plan to keep the coach do not use rubber. With rubber you will have to deal with the deterioation of the rubber every year for ever. I love my fiberglass roof. Ken
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Old 12-31-2010, 08:25 AM   #6
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Full-size 4' X 8' fiberglass sheets are available at HD and Lowes for little money. Marine suppliers have resin and mat. Overlaying large spots is relatively simple and the resin-soaked mat can be used for the edges and where it rolls down to vertical. Finally painted with Fusion or Awlgrip, the repair will be noticable only if you look closely and know where to look. It'll also be more than twice as strong as the original roof.

If I were to have it done I'd take it to a boat repair facility rather than an auto body shop simply because they deal with fiberglass hulls on a regular basis and will know better how to make the repairs.
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Old 12-31-2010, 12:28 PM   #7
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Bob has a great suggestion regarding expertise in fiberglass (actually refered to in my industry as Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic, or FRP). An RV repair place isn't the right outfit if they haven't done their share of FRP repair.

I'd stay away from the bonded rubber. Whatever they use for bonding the rubber might be a weak link down the road, and the rubber itself isn't nearly as bulletproof or long lived as FRP; it would also make an ugly patch. IIWMI'd be thinking clean & prep roof to receive newly laid fiberglass patch(es), followed by some sanding & prep for linear polyurethane paint (Awlgrip mentioned above is one good brand). You might need touch up where the roof rolls to the walls w/coach color if the roof isn't all white to the drip edge. Good time to redo the drip edge seal at the walls, and all other caulking BTW.
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