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Old 07-10-2008, 08:15 PM   #15
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This is great information. Thank you for posting it, as it will help us all.

We have the Goodyears, and at rest, cool they are in the 121-124 range. I have seen them get as hot as 150, and my tire sensors showed red, so I pulled off and let them cool. That was when it was around 110 on the asphalt going to Montana. We needeed to eat anyway, and it was a good time to stop as well. The genset got excersized, we cooled of the coach, all in all just a good time to stop.
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Old 07-10-2008, 10:25 PM   #16
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OF,

First give me the tire size on your coach. I think it is 11R22.5. Your load range is H, because you can run 120 PSI. At 120 PSI the front axle can weigh 13,220. If your front axle weighs more you were over loaded. I doubt it does.

A Bridgestone R260, which we run on ours will carry the same load as the Toyo, in a 11R22.5 load range "H". So, how does the Bridgestone carry a higher load? It doesn't. It might wear better because you are paying more.

IMHO, though I haven't seen your tires, he has given you some misinformation.
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Old 07-11-2008, 08:37 AM   #17
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I had a 2000 40Ft Alpine and my 2005 40ft Alpine
both had the same problem. I had a an alienment and found toe in was out. I also replaced front tires at 22,000 miles. I had GY 397 put on, and the coach drives better and now after 4500 miles no wear. I have 105psi cold inflation even though tire says max 120
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Old 07-11-2008, 10:42 AM   #18
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What is the order of moving the tires when rotating tires on a motorhome?
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Old 07-11-2008, 12:32 PM   #19
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Old Forester, as we have discussed before, I chose the Brigestone R280's, H rated, for several reasons. First, I was able to get fleet pricing. Second, the excellent reputation Bridgestone has established for having a tough casing. Third, I really like the wide shoulder ribs that should slow down the scuffing pattern that rv steering axle tires seem to have.
Looks like we have a tire specialist (Tom) on the forum. Appreciated reading his imput.
By the way, I run 100psi all the way around.
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Old 07-11-2008, 06:33 PM   #20
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Front Toyo tires on my 40' coach exhibited the same shoulder wear as others here have described as early as 5K miles. Always ran 105 to 110 psi on the steer tires. This abnormal wear appears to be an inherent characteristic of the Toyo tires. Replaced them at 26K miles with Kelly KRH tires (load range H) and had them bead balanced. The result is the coach drives significantly better with far less vibration.
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Old 07-11-2008, 07:58 PM   #21
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A few comments to my post, because I thought it might get a few interesting comments.

Lindenburg: the proper tire rotation pattern on a coach is to rotate the two front tires to both duals on one side of the coach. The next rotation, rotate both front tires to the duals on the opposite side of the coach. That keeps the tire diameters on the one side of the coach rear wheels the same. If you rotate the front tires to the outside duals on the same side, for example, you run into a scuffing issue with the other dual tire on that side, hence the need to rotate both front to one side of the rear axle.

For those of you running the 11R-22.5 Toyos at less than 120 psi front and 110 rear you are running an issue with tread separation and against a directive from both Toyo and WRV to run them at the 120/110 psi range.

Beagle, as we have discussed before, and based on my brother's opinion of running a truck tire shop and Bandag capping truck and bus tires for many years, I will most likely follow you when my tires wear out with Bridgestones for the casing life, the wide shoulder ribs that reduce scuffing as you pointed out, and the increased tread depth/longer mileage over Goodyears.

Tom and Patty, I think the difference is the Bridgestone in a load range "H" is just a tougher casing than Toyos and fewer historical problems with blowouts, based on the input I have received. If you didn't think Bridgestone's were better in the same load range, why did you replace your Toyos with them? Or does the 260 have a lower load range than the 280? I haven't looked at their tables recently.

Anyway, I do think the Toyos produce this type of tread wear issue more than others based on the Les Schwab manager's input of seeing a lot of coaches, especially Alpines, and the input from others on this forum. And again, it's not an alignment issue, it's uniform wear inside and outside on both front tires.
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Old 07-12-2008, 09:55 AM   #22
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Tom and Patty, I think the difference is the Bridgestone in a load range "H" is just a tougher casing than Toyos and fewer historical problems with blowouts, based on the input I have received. If you didn't think Bridgestone's were better in the same load range, why did you replace your Toyos with them? Or does the 260 have a lower load range than the 280? I haven't looked at their tables recently. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

In a nut shell, you do pay for what you get. Excatly as you said OF. Belt widths, bead packages, bead roundness, tread compounding all add to costs but make a better wearing longer running tire.

The 260's and the 280's will carry the same weight in like sizes and load ranges. 280 is a long to medium haul tire with anti-erosion grooves. 260 is a metro tire, pick up and delivery with solid shoulders

I run the 260's because of our large amount of mountain driving. I wanted a high scrub tire (lots of hard cornering in the <STRIKE>BMW</STRIKE> Alpine) I'm in the business and don't sell Toyo's, but if I did, I would have still upgraded. Plus I got a deal .

On the other hand, I replaced our Toyos at six years of age, had river wear, and ran 95 PSI, according to the weight of our front axle and side to side weights.

But, please do what Aline and Toyo tell you to do!! 120 PSI.My counseler tells me I have to add this
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Old 07-13-2008, 07:44 PM   #23
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Tom and Patty,

Thanks for your explanation of the difference between the 260 and 280 Bridgestones. I know it will be one of them for me, and probably the 280s, like Beagle RC Air used, when we replace because we do a lot of long distance driving -- 15,000 miles a year so far. I didn't really understand teh 260/280 difference.

I'm also hoping that with the tire rotation that moved the front ones with their river wear to the rear, that I'll perhaps get another year or two out of the Toyos before I have to make the switch, The tread depth is still very good.

I have a feeling I don't need the 120/110 psi in these tires on our 36, at 30,000 lbs total weight, and they would be more comfortable on the road if they weren't that high, but I'm listening to Toyo and WRV's directive just in case I do have a serious issue with the Toyos.
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Old 07-19-2008, 09:21 AM   #24
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has anyone look at the yokohana tires. at the tire shop it was suggested to try these tires. they do sell the brigestone tires as posted. the rep thought both tires were equally matched. he did not steer me away from the bridgestone, he just gave me more info. any thoughts
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Old 07-19-2008, 03:15 PM   #25
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I have recently fitted Yokohamas on my rear axle. Only done a few hundred miles since but they seem to be OK. The shop inflated them to 100 psi but that gave much too hard a ride. I did get my rig weighed and based on that I now run 85 psi on the rears; much better.
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Old 07-19-2008, 11:15 PM   #26
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could you tell me why you choose to put these tires on. why not on the front? did you look at any other tire. message to john and mary knight
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Old 07-20-2008, 09:33 AM   #27
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When I bought the coach a few months ago the front tires were new but the rears needed replacing. The Yokohamas were mid-price, not the cheapest nor the most expensive the dealer had in stock, but he recommended them. The ones I have are the RY023 all position tires.
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Old 07-24-2008, 06:28 PM   #28
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As stated before (2005) I did an alignment and put 147's on the front axle after the OE's started cupping at 30K miles. I'm now at 76K and no cupping.
But not all Toyos are LRH (which specifies 120 psi cold). Mine are LRG (110 psi cold).
BTW, I had RVSEF weigh the coach at the FMCA St Paul rally. They said the left front tire had much more load than the right and suggested I have the ride height adjusted. Somewhere on the forums I saw that one should always verify correct ride height before aligning.
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