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Old 05-27-2008, 09:51 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Alpine Owners Club
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 2,226
Hello all, was thinking on how to make things work when the right thing was not there. So I put together some things that might come in handy in a pinch.

- Use those Laundry Soap Buckets you get from Costco for the chemicals, the lids snap down, and will keep them from Mixing. Warning - Never mix Clorox with any organic product, i.e., oil, grease, brake fluid, WD-40, it will cause a huge hot fire, and your life is worth more than that. In addition, never use Halon to put out a gasoline fire - you will create mustard gas, as a byproduct, it will kill you.

- Carry 1 qt of Clorox or some iodine to purify water in an emergency. Iodine would be my first choice, but the meth heads have made it a controlled substance so it's hard to get in any quantity. A good drug store can get it for you; don't know the limitations on quantity.

- Use a spring to hold up the cable in the gen set area - make sure it has enough latitude to go sideways and not run into anything. Use gorilla tape and big wire ties to hold it in place. A better solution would have been heavy gauge marine (the size of the individual wires which make up the total size are smaller in diameter, consequently the wire has lots more give to it) wire with vinyl insulation - the flex covering used, is great for outdoor installations, but it's not designed to move around a lot-consider rewiring it with the correct type of cable, this problem will go away if you can.

- Use pieces of soft foam molded (many new electronics come packed with this type of soft foam-so any computer store, electronics place can give you a few pieces) to the ladder edge to protect the skin of the motor home so you can go up on the roof. You can glue a piece of Velcro (soft Side - about 1" w X 4 feet in length) to the both legs of the ladder. The foam would get the rough side of the Velcro, and this way it's adjustable. A good 4 foot strip on the inside of each leg should do the trick, assuming you have a folding "A" Frame type ladder, if not, the extension type would work.

- When you are tightening the same bolt/nut combination more than three times, double nut the bolt, it won't get loose again. Even if nylon type nut, this will keep it tight.

- A good pair of vice grip pliers is what it will take to keep the carriage bolt from turning when trying to tighten a nut on the other end. You can also try silicon, or carpenters glue to keep it from turning, but I don't think this will work because of the torque factors involved. If possible and nothing get burned, you can see if someone can spot weld it for you, but this might preclude taking it apart in the future.

- Big wire ties will hold almost anything for a long time, the ones that are 1/4" wide or wider and 18" long, and they will not deteriorate in the elements either. By these from the electrical section of HD or Lowes, they have been treated against UV, and most solvents. & Keep an assortment of ty-wraps (wire ties) and an assortment of solder less connectors around, you never know when you will need either. Harbor freight has kits of both - cheap, but we are talking an emergency fix, for long term - you flux then solder the wire, then crimp a new good quality connector on it. Electricity always (DC or AC) uses the outside layers of the wire, by soldering it, you get a better connection, it fuses the wires into one, and will lower resistance. Use Rosin Flux, not just rosin core solder, the flux causes the solder to flow into the wire, and if you crimp on the connector quickly after the solder process, it will spread a little but not break.

- Purchase a few plumbing PEX connectors to join pipe and plug pipe, never know when you need one or the other. "T", 90's and 45, are also a good choice, maybe two each. You may never need them, but it will be a godsend if you do.

- Carry Teflon pipe joint tape, have about three rolls, it will come in handy lots of the time.

- Several rolls of electrical tape, buy good stuff Scotch 88, is the best, works well when temps are cold, guaranteed to handle 600 Volts. Two - Three rolls should do the trick.

- You can also carry a can of liquid electrical tape, Scotch make it, not too expensive, Platt or Eoff Electric can sell it to you. I think it has a shelf life.

- Rubber vulcanizing tape is also a great life saver and can patch things nothing else will touch. You can patch a radiator hose with this stuff to get you buy in an emergency. Any old-timers familiar with the tire vulcanizing process swear by this method to fix some things. Scotch again.

- And don't forget the old standby "Duct Tape", but keep it in a cool place as the glue surface get gooey when it gets hot. Gorilla Tape is also reported to be good, have never used it.

Hope these come in handy, and if you have additional tips, we can all use them.
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Old 05-27-2008, 09:51 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Alpine Owners Club
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 2,226
Hello all, was thinking on how to make things work when the right thing was not there. So I put together some things that might come in handy in a pinch.

- Use those Laundry Soap Buckets you get from Costco for the chemicals, the lids snap down, and will keep them from Mixing. Warning - Never mix Clorox with any organic product, i.e., oil, grease, brake fluid, WD-40, it will cause a huge hot fire, and your life is worth more than that. In addition, never use Halon to put out a gasoline fire - you will create mustard gas, as a byproduct, it will kill you.

- Carry 1 qt of Clorox or some iodine to purify water in an emergency. Iodine would be my first choice, but the meth heads have made it a controlled substance so it's hard to get in any quantity. A good drug store can get it for you; don't know the limitations on quantity.

- Use a spring to hold up the cable in the gen set area - make sure it has enough latitude to go sideways and not run into anything. Use gorilla tape and big wire ties to hold it in place. A better solution would have been heavy gauge marine (the size of the individual wires which make up the total size are smaller in diameter, consequently the wire has lots more give to it) wire with vinyl insulation - the flex covering used, is great for outdoor installations, but it's not designed to move around a lot-consider rewiring it with the correct type of cable, this problem will go away if you can.

- Use pieces of soft foam molded (many new electronics come packed with this type of soft foam-so any computer store, electronics place can give you a few pieces) to the ladder edge to protect the skin of the motor home so you can go up on the roof. You can glue a piece of Velcro (soft Side - about 1" w X 4 feet in length) to the both legs of the ladder. The foam would get the rough side of the Velcro, and this way it's adjustable. A good 4 foot strip on the inside of each leg should do the trick, assuming you have a folding "A" Frame type ladder, if not, the extension type would work.

- When you are tightening the same bolt/nut combination more than three times, double nut the bolt, it won't get loose again. Even if nylon type nut, this will keep it tight.

- A good pair of vice grip pliers is what it will take to keep the carriage bolt from turning when trying to tighten a nut on the other end. You can also try silicon, or carpenters glue to keep it from turning, but I don't think this will work because of the torque factors involved. If possible and nothing get burned, you can see if someone can spot weld it for you, but this might preclude taking it apart in the future.

- Big wire ties will hold almost anything for a long time, the ones that are 1/4" wide or wider and 18" long, and they will not deteriorate in the elements either. By these from the electrical section of HD or Lowes, they have been treated against UV, and most solvents. & Keep an assortment of ty-wraps (wire ties) and an assortment of solder less connectors around, you never know when you will need either. Harbor freight has kits of both - cheap, but we are talking an emergency fix, for long term - you flux then solder the wire, then crimp a new good quality connector on it. Electricity always (DC or AC) uses the outside layers of the wire, by soldering it, you get a better connection, it fuses the wires into one, and will lower resistance. Use Rosin Flux, not just rosin core solder, the flux causes the solder to flow into the wire, and if you crimp on the connector quickly after the solder process, it will spread a little but not break.

- Purchase a few plumbing PEX connectors to join pipe and plug pipe, never know when you need one or the other. "T", 90's and 45, are also a good choice, maybe two each. You may never need them, but it will be a godsend if you do.

- Carry Teflon pipe joint tape, have about three rolls, it will come in handy lots of the time.

- Several rolls of electrical tape, buy good stuff Scotch 88, is the best, works well when temps are cold, guaranteed to handle 600 Volts. Two - Three rolls should do the trick.

- You can also carry a can of liquid electrical tape, Scotch make it, not too expensive, Platt or Eoff Electric can sell it to you. I think it has a shelf life.

- Rubber vulcanizing tape is also a great life saver and can patch things nothing else will touch. You can patch a radiator hose with this stuff to get you buy in an emergency. Any old-timers familiar with the tire vulcanizing process swear by this method to fix some things. Scotch again.

- And don't forget the old standby "Duct Tape", but keep it in a cool place as the glue surface get gooey when it gets hot. Gorilla Tape is also reported to be good, have never used it.

Hope these come in handy, and if you have additional tips, we can all use them.
__________________

__________________
Monty & Janet - 2007 Alpine APEX 40 MDTS
S/N - 75715 - Retired - Master Certified RV Tech
Old Rv'er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2008, 11:16 AM   #3
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Auburn, CA, Havasu, AZ & Mulege, BCS
Posts: 5,217
J-B Weld.

And I always carry stainless safety wire. You can get it at better motorcycle shops, online, or at Harbor Freight. Much better than iron tie wire, doesn't rust, great tensile strength for repairs and remanufacturing of motorhome systems.

I love Harbor Freight, however I wouldn't get their electrical connectors. I don't want to redo connections at a later time for lack of quality in the hardware. HF gets most of their junque from China, where they don't make it if you can't put lead in it. I got a recall notice from HF for blade type fuses I bought in one of the "warehouse" packages; seems the filament doesn't melt at the stated amperage, so your wiring burns up instead. Instead, try a Fastenal near you. They have good prices and good quality stuff. I assembled a good set of crimp and other connectors there. HD or Lowes for wire nuts.

While @ Fastenal, get a supply of flangenuts in a good variety of sizes. These save fishing around for a basic washer, and they don't drop down in your socket when you are trying to install one blind. They are also manufactured in a good quality of steel; not that cheap junque from China with a 40% certified minimum lead content.
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