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Old 01-12-2019, 08:55 PM   #1
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Why Double Pane Windows?

Double pane windows in an RV appear to often loose their seal and become a vision problem for the driver and passenger sides.
Why then are double panes used ?
Why not use single pane automotive windows and can single panes be found to replace the double pane?
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:03 PM   #2
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Double pane for insulation, the gas between the panes is a good insulator. Yes the seals eventually fail and let moisture and dirt between where it can't be cleaned.

And i did see where someone offers a thick single pane to replace the double but it’s significantly heavier and not as good insulator as the double pane.
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:05 PM   #3
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I have a recent thread where I removed the inner pane on front side windows for safety when driving in the class a forum.
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:44 PM   #4
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Double pane windows reduce or prevent condensation during cold weather; in other words the windows don't sweat. Possibly even more important, to us at least, is the enormous reduction in outside noise that enters the coach.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:00 PM   #5
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Double pane for insulation, the gas between the panes is a good insulator. Yes the seals eventually fail and let moisture and dirt between where it can't be cleaned.

And i did see where someone offers a thick single pane to replace the double but itís significantly heavier and not as good insulator as the double pane.

There is no gas (other than air) between panes in RV windows. Household thermal windows do have an inert gas.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:52 PM   #6
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I can tell you that my Kountry Star with double pane windows is extremely quiet inside. We just donít hear much at all outside.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:53 PM   #7
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Double pane for insulation, the gas between the panes is a good insulator. Yes the seals eventually fail and let moisture and dirt between where it can't be cleaned.
It's a misconception that the insulating value of dual pane windows relates to the presence of some "special gas" between the panes. In reality the insulating value is almost entirely related to the fact that the gas trapped between the panes is a rather poor thermal conductor so the heat transfer from one piece of glass to the second is greatly reduced.

The use of an inert gas between the panes in some residential windows is primarily to ensure that no water vapor that could condense gets trapped between the glass panes. Furthermore, it should be noted that one of the largest and finest window manufacturers, Pella, doesn't use fused glass panes with inert glass between them at all. Pella's windows use individual glass panes separated by a larger spacing than most manufacturers. The gas between the panes is just air.

Not to get too technical, but the "R-value" of a single piece of glass is a bit less than one (pretty bad). The R-value of two pieces of glass pretty much independent of what gas is between them is roughly twice that or close to "2". The heat loss or gain through a window is inversely proportional to the R-value. So a window with an R-value of 2 will have half the heat transfer (per unit of time) than will a window with an R-value of 1. That's a huge performance improvement.

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Old 01-13-2019, 08:45 AM   #8
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Air is a gas last time i checked not a pure gas but a mixture of gasses mostly n2 and O2 I thought about saying air but thought gas would cover all applications not knowing if some mfg has gone to using inert gas between the panes.

I see nothing but benefit of dual pane until you cant see out of them then its a hazard if they’re used to drive and then high cost to repair unless you’re ok with the cheap fix.
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:58 AM   #9
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Double pane windows in an RV appear to often loose their seal and become a vision problem for the driver and passenger sides.
Why then are double panes used ?
Why not use single pane automotive windows and can single panes be found to replace the double pane?
Simple answer - So you can use the RV in less than perfect weather.

The biggest non-insulated area of any rv will be the non-insulated windows, (Non-Double Pane) usually this is the front window on a Coach, which is regulated by the Feds

IMHO if the Double Pane window becomes a vision problem have it Fixed - not that big a Deal.

We use our Coach year round in all types of weather and in Hot and Cold seasons will place Reflectix bubble insulation in the front window to help alleviate the Issue it presents.

JMHO,
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Old 01-13-2019, 09:00 AM   #10
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Why Double Pane Windows?

Iím sure there are more suppliers but RV Glass Solutions makes a laminated glass in several tints for side windows. They also repair or provide new ilg panels
I feel itís probably a good idea for the driver or passenger door window.
Having had both on Rvís the insulation and lack or moisture on the windows is nice but the quiet is very noticeable on ilg
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Old 01-13-2019, 09:07 AM   #11
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You are certainly correct in that a poorly designed or constructed dual pane window whose seals have failed will cause loss of visibility due to moisture into the void between the glass panels. However, the advantage of properly functioning dual pane windows are several, including less noise transfer, less heat transfer, greatly reduced condensation on the inner panel, etc. We would not own another coach without dual pane windows.

That being said, you get what you pay for. You can't expect a Yugo to stand up with the same quality as say a Subaru, but then again, the Subaru costs a lot more money.

We are the 2nd owners of a 2001 Dutch Star Class A DP. Now 18 years old, with 146,000 miles, and none of the dual pane windows are fogged or damaged in any way. Nor have any of them ever been repaired or replaced. They were properly designed, built, and installed. And they cost more.

Not all dual pane windows are created equal. Research problems, manufacturers with good reputations and results, and stick to those. Or just have faith in what the sales person tells you and take you chances! There are reputable companies out there who make good livings repairing poorly designed/built dual pane windows!

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Old 01-13-2019, 10:25 AM   #12
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We are the 2nd owners of a 2001 Dutch Star Class A DP. Now 18 years old, with 146,000 miles, and none of the dual pane windows are fogged or damaged in any way. Nor have any of them ever been repaired or replaced. They were properly designed, built, and installed. And they cost more.
We're in a similar situation with our 19 year old Beaver. A couple of the windows have seals which have "snaked" away from the edges of the glass by a few inches, but none of them have any fogging. One of these days on a trip north we'll stop by RV Fog Doctor in Arkansas to get one or two of them fixed, but it's not an urgent problem IMHO.

FWIW our windows were made by SE-GI like those in many RVs of the period.
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Old 01-13-2019, 12:02 PM   #13
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We are the 2nd owners of a 2001 Dutch Star Class A DP. Now 18 years old, with 146,000 miles, and none of the dual pane windows are fogged or damaged in any way. Nor have any of them ever been repaired or replaced. They were properly designed, built, and installed. And they cost more.

Same here (knock on wood!) My 2005 Kountry Star has dual pane windows, and so far they are still in good shape. I like them because they don't sweat, and because they help the overall quietness of the coach. Really impressive how quiet the old girl is. We never hear much of anything going on outside.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:23 PM   #14
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We're in a similar situation with our 19 year old Beaver. A couple of the windows have seals which have "snaked" away from the edges of the glass by a few inches, but none of them have any fogging. One of these days on a trip north we'll stop by RV Fog Doctor in Arkansas to get one or two of them fixed, but it's not an urgent problem IMHO.

FWIW our windows were made by SE-GI like those in many RVs of the period.
SE-GI used a glass spacer called Swiggle. As opposed to a traditional aluminum spacer, it was an extruded material similar to butyl. It was designed for residential use and even in stationary homes it had problems. On an RV with black frames and tinted glass, the sun exposed windows would heat up in the day which heats the air between the glass lites. It also softens the glass spacer. Pressure builds until the now soft spacer 'burps' the pressure and the pressure then equalizes again to the atmosphere. At night the window cools and the interior IG pressure reduces below atmospheric pressure and the spacer pulls towards the interior of the window. This happens over and over and you then see the tide lines formed by the spacer movement.

This problem was mostly seen on the side of RV's stored facing the sun. It was much less seen on mostly mobile RV's on those stored indoors.
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