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Old 04-27-2016, 04:05 PM   #15
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Hankook requires 9" rims. The price I pay,,,, I really want all to match, as well as mounted tire width Hankook is up and coming in the premium tire world they are building a plant in the U.S.
10-4! Understand your thinking, and did not know that the AH12's were not compatible to 8.25" rims.

One thing nice, the lower entry costs of the Hankook's, will help offset the one time costs of the 9" rims.

Best to you,
Smitty
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Old 04-27-2016, 04:16 PM   #16
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I hear you Bob..

Depending on where we're going, we run 15 > 395 > 58 over to 99 by Bakersfield. We had a site in Park of the Sierra's Escapees COOP, so 99 was the primary route to Fesno where we'd pick up 41 towards Coarsegold.

It was close to Bakersfield where I could not move to the right (two cars off to the side) or to the left lane (two semi's passing). I was in a line of Semi's still in the right, and could not avoid the the hole. Got my outside right dual, and tag. The outside dual had a ruptured cord, the tag had a slipped cord. I suspect a less robust tire then the 12R XZE* would have blown the outside dual.

Thanks for the tip on staying away from the 57/10!

Best,
Smitty
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Old 04-28-2016, 08:13 AM   #17
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I hear you Bob..

Depending on where we're going, we run 15 > 395 > 58 over to 99 by Bakersfield. We had a site in Park of the Sierra's Escapees COOP, so 99 was the primary route to Fesno where we'd pick up 41 towards Coarsegold.

It was close to Bakersfield where I could not move to the right (two cars off to the side) or to the left lane (two semi's passing). I was in a line of Semi's still in the right, and could not avoid the the hole. Got my outside right dual, and tag. The outside dual had a ruptured cord, the tag had a slipped cord. I suspect a less robust tire then the 12R XZE* would have blown the outside dual.

Thanks for the tip on staying away from the 57/10!

Best,
Smitty
I have read / heard several times that Michelin tires , being the best on the market, are prone to catastrophe failure ( blow outs ) over other brands. This is not scientific of coarse , but in my own experience the only blow out I ever had was an inside duel a few years ago on my Monaco Windsor. Took out air bags , inter fender parts, flaps, quite a mess. I do think the Michelin tire is less likely to loose it's cap/ tread than other makes. Overall, over the years , there was no match up with the French tire maker as far as what works best . I ran a lot of trucks pulling lowboy trailers, using 15" wheels . Only Michlein ( Sears too ) would last very long at all. Problems were always about heat buildup in such a small size tire. I think they were 17 ply , where all the alternatives were only 10 ply.
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Old 04-28-2016, 09:51 AM   #18
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I have never had an RV tire failure. I have used BF Goodrich, Michelin, Goodyear, Dunlop, and Firestone. Those brands are in the last 10 years, have been RVing since 1980. I do try and stick with only USA made tires due to US having strict quality control. The exception being a couple of Michelin tires were made in Spain. So I am a bit of an agnostic on any of the major brands that makes tires here. Oh, and I like to buy USA made things so we keep our own people working, like my children.

The FMCA Michelin plan is what got me back to buying Michelin. The 28% or so premium you pay for them compared to Firestone and Dunlop always seemed a bit high.

Overall I think the very best tires made are Michelin and Goodyear. But with cost included in it becomes worth it to consider other brands.
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Old 04-28-2016, 07:26 PM   #19
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I have never had an RV tire failure. I have used BF Goodrich, Michelin, Goodyear, Dunlop, and Firestone. Those brands are in the last 10 years, have been RVing since 1980. I do try and stick with only USA made tires due to US having strict quality control. The exception being a couple of Michelin tires were made in Spain. So I am a bit of an agnostic on any of the major brands that makes tires here. Oh, and I like to buy USA made things so we keep our own people working, like my children.

The FMCA Michelin plan is what got me back to buying Michelin. The 28% or so premium you pay for them compared to Firestone and Dunlop always seemed a bit high.

Overall I think the very best tires made are Michelin and Goodyear. But with cost included in it becomes worth it to consider other brands.
Could be the best tires are made all over the world. Just about all brands are made in various plants around the globe. Finnish Nokian tires maybe at the front of the line, problem is they have limited sizes. I put them on my JD loader for snow work a few years ago , pricey but worth it for sure. They have ruled the ice racing circuit for many years.
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Old 04-28-2016, 07:59 PM   #20
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So, replacing 8yr old Toyo's that have been in a dark garage when ot being used. Just preventative, no outward sign of failure. After researching in this area (Boise) Micheline over 5800, Toyo, a little over 3700, Dayton, ~2700.00

Pricing for 12R22.5 X 6, all tax, disposal, mount, etc.

Called today, tires are in, DOT code of 4415.

Is that too old? Should I expect more recent Mfg date?

Input/opinions? Budget is a consideration......
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:23 PM   #21
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Darstar - Yes it could be that the best tires are made all over the World, but for motorhomes built in the USA, drive on USA roads, and the type of coaches we drive are almost unknown anywhere else in the World except for Canada, the best tires in the World are made here by companies that know our conditions. When and if Hankook builds a plant in the USA and also makes motorhome type tires here in this country then maybe they will have the same advantages as people already making and engineering tires made here. In addition, companies that build tires here are subject to our laws and regulations in this country. Plus as a final advantage, the people that build tires in this country employ US workers doing the building not just selling and servicing. Korea is quite good at selling us stuff and not good at all at buying things from us. How many US made cars sold in Korea last year? 2?

And that is just my opinion and not meant to offend anyone. But I do believe in US made products.
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:34 PM   #22
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I love it when people say Michelin is a foreign company!
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Michelin has been a part of the tire industry in the United States since 1907 when it purchased the International Rubber Company in Milltown, New Jersey.
And all their tires are made overseas:
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Michelin North America is a $10.76 billion dollar a year company operating 19 plants in 16 locations and employs 22,000 people. It manufactures and sells tires for airplanes, automobiles, farm equipment, heavy duty trucks, motorcycles, and bicycles. Michelin manufactures tires in six states: Alabama, Indiana, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Carolina and South Carolina.
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:53 PM   #23
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So, replacing 8yr old Toyo's that have been in a dark garage when ot being used. Just preventative, no outward sign of failure. After researching in this area (Boise) Micheline over 5800, Toyo, a little over 3700, Dayton, ~2700.00

Pricing for 12R22.5 X 6, all tax, disposal, mount, etc.

Called today, tires are in, DOT code of 4415.

Is that too old? Should I expect more recent Mfg date?

Input/opinions? Budget is a consideration......

For me, right on the edge of as old as I would take. Week 44 is 10/26-11/1. So now at 6 months of age. If you like that tire, an like that price, and have already asked and been told they can't get any younger - yeah, I'd be OK with a that date.

And of course, the tire industry will sometimes preach that 'Tires in the warehouse don't age.'. And probably a reality that they do not age as much as if they were exposed to the sun's UV rays. But as I just went thru discussion like this with a Junction City Tire Dealer, I'll share my response to them. My main comments were:
-RV owners replace ties by age well before they'll ever wear out.
-Vs truckers, usually wear them out at a very young age.
-And even if they don't age in the warehouse. A prospective buyer of an RV is going to go by the Born On Date of the tire, when determining how much life is left in them.

The reality is that RV'ers make up a very small percentage of the tires sold in the Trucker Size. We usually are more picky as customers, needing more hand holding thru the process. I believe many Tire Dealers consider RV'ers more of a nuisance, then additive to the profit margin! And frankly, tire manufactures seem to feel this way too. As very few have products developed for the RV'ing community. Tires with superior compound mixtures and protective additives, to handle longer lives of 5, 6 or longer years of service.

I'll stop.

OP, if you like those tires and that price - the age in my opinion is OK!

Best to you, and all,
Smitty
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Old 04-29-2016, 07:47 AM   #24
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For me, right on the edge of as old as I would take. Week 44 is 10/26-11/1. So now at 6 months of age. If you like that tire, an like that price, and have already asked and been told they can't get any younger - yeah, I'd be OK with a that date.

And of course, the tire industry will sometimes preach that 'Tires in the warehouse don't age.'. And probably a reality that they do not age as much as if they were exposed to the sun's UV rays. But as I just went thru discussion like this with a Junction City Tire Dealer, I'll share my response to them. My main comments were:
-RV owners replace ties by age well before they'll ever wear out.
-Vs truckers, usually wear them out at a very young age.
-And even if they don't age in the warehouse. A prospective buyer of an RV is going to go by the Born On Date of the tire, when determining how much life is left in them.

The reality is that RV'ers make up a very small percentage of the tires sold in the Trucker Size. We usually are more picky as customers, needing more hand holding thru the process. I believe many Tire Dealers consider RV'ers more of a nuisance, then additive to the profit margin! And frankly, tire manufactures seem to feel this way too. As very few have products developed for the RV'ing community. Tires with superior compound mixtures and protective additives, to handle longer lives of 5, 6 or longer years of service.

I'll stop.

OP, if you like those tires and that price - the age in my opinion is OK!

Best to you, and all,
Smitty
Technically there is no shelf life factor for tires. Show me a tire MFG that will put it in writing, specifically, ...I have yet to have found one. Tires are not like dairy food , no experation date, or " use by" date.

Big RVs actually use larger tires than 95 percent of the truck/commercial market. You won't find many trucks using 365s or 315s........vocational use an exception. ( as in cement mixers ).

And back to my statement about where tires are made......Michelins , the big sizes are made in other Countries. Yes, quality control is an issue , that's anywhere, not just North America. Hankook is considered as good as Michlein , maybe better depending on usage. I agree , buy American ( Canada included ) if you can, however , that used to be said about cars, especially Corporate fleets , like insurance companies, not any more. Automotive is a worldwide mix, especially when it comes to all the parts that go to make a car or an RV , any size. This is the area we need to address, no MFG should be driven offshore and put people out of work . Let water seek its own level so to speek, stop giving big business reasons to move overseas, including Mexico.No tax breaks etc., . We need tariffs , not to restrict trade, but to bring back a level playing field.
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:57 PM   #25
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How did a thread about tires and their performance become a post about tariffs and businesses moving off shore? Sorry, it just seems it is off track. Not informative, just a rant. Smitty77, thanks for your positive input.
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Old 04-30-2016, 01:14 AM   #26
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How did a thread about tires and their performance become a post about tariffs and businesses moving off shore? Sorry, it just seems it is off track. Not informative, just a rant. Smitty77, thanks for your positive input.
Well, that's the way it always goes , tires are like religion and politics , everyone has an opioin . 'Twas not me that started this conservation ether. Guess I should not have replied ?
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Old 04-30-2016, 11:50 AM   #27
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Thanks to all of you, and it is all good, as info and opinion sharing is what these forums are all about - so no worries from viewpoint.

I do have a comment on the Hankook's AH12's. As I mentioned before, I feel they are a good bank for the buck, built with good quality control, and many large DP's owners I know have had good success with them.

That being said, my goals on the set of 6 out of 8 tires was to get both tires that had less rolling resistance and a more comfortable ride, then our Michelin XZE*'s.

The AH12's are not listed on the Michelin Rolling Resistant Comparison site, so I could not check that. Hankook does not have them listed as a Steer or All Position tire on their Long Haul Tractor Trailer. They do have them listed under the LPT Trailer tires for Long Haul Tractor Trailer. They do have it as All Position under Regional Haul Tractor Trailer. The Michelin XZE*'s are also rated as All Position for Regional Duty by Michelin.

I was specifically wanting tires rated for All Position and Long Haul. And the Michelin Rolling Resistance Comparison site did have the XZA2's listed so I could compare them to the XZE*'s - quite a bit better on rolling resistance. So that was a nod to the XZA2's. And my opinion is that tires beefed up for Regional Delivery Duty, typically have a more 'stout' ride then those that were designed for Long Haul duty.

Also as mentioned, the AH12 do not list the 8.25" rims as an alternative on their information available online. Sure, I could have called and talked with a tech specialist, and suspect they would have said the 8.25" would be OK, perhaps with a lower load rating. (Many other brands of 12R tires, are OK, many without derating of weight loads, for the 8.25" rims.) So that was another factor.

A final observation, when I'm comparing tires, is their weight. I have found the Michelin tires, are usually heavier then those of other manufactures, comparing the same size tires. For example, the XZE*'s are almost 40 lbs heavier then some of the other brands I compared them too. Now just because a tire is heavier, does not make it more robust or safer - however in the case of the Michelin, I do feel they give a more substantial/safer tire then many others. And I did use the weight meaning more material, in the case of the XZE*'s this was in the sidewalls. So to me, I feel this provided an added safety edge. Another example is the two BF Goodrich ST230's I just moved form the Steers to the Tags, these are also quite a bit less weight then the XZE*'s.

Again, weight is not a scientific way to compare, but I personally use it as one of my many criteria for choosing a tire.

On this set of tires, the 6 295/80 XZA2's, I do have a tire that weighs less then the 12R, but went with them due to being 15 months newer Born On Date then the XZE*'s and or ST230's available. And more so because they are rated for Long Haul, and the Michelin Rolling Resistant Site does show them to be 27% lower rolling resistant then the XZE*'s. And many, many reports of owners liking the 'feel of the ride' of the XZA2's. And you see my opinion on the early riding is that they are indeed substantially better riding then either the XZE*'s and or the ST230's, especially from the Steers perspective. And, they feel just as 'sure footed' and 'track well' too.

I also want to point out what a few other posters have said on other tire related sites. Sometimes we can just get too carried away on over analyzing many things about RV components. Most of the tires on the roadway today, are both safe, and will do the job. (Properly inflated and cared for, of course.) So just making a decision and getting out and get going, is what RV'ing is all about. No wrong, no right. And for sure, we all have a right on how we want to spend our money. (And to be clear, I for sure resemble those that seem to overanalyze many areas of RV'ing, tires included. But, that's what I like to do!)

Best to all, be safe, have fun,
Smitty
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Old 04-30-2016, 02:28 PM   #28
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Thanks to all of you, and it is all good, as info and opinion sharing is what these forums are all about - so no worries from viewpoint.

I do have a comment on the Hankook's AH12's. As I mentioned before, I feel they are a good bank for the buck, built with good quality control, and many large DP's owners I know have had good success with them.

That being said, my goals on the set of 6 out of 8 tires was to get both tires that had less rolling resistance and a more comfortable ride, then our Michelin XZE*'s.

The AH12's are not listed on the Michelin Rolling Resistant Comparison site, so I could not check that. Hankook does not have them listed as a Steer or All Position tire on their Long Haul Tractor Trailer. They do have them listed under the LPT Trailer tires for Long Haul Tractor Trailer. They do have it as All Position under Regional Haul Tractor Trailer. The Michelin XZE*'s are also rated as All Position for Regional Duty by Michelin.

I was specifically wanting tires rated for All Position and Long Haul. And the Michelin Rolling Resistance Comparison site did have the XZA2's listed so I could compare them to the XZE*'s - quite a bit better on rolling resistance. So that was a nod to the XZA2's. And my opinion is that tires beefed up for Regional Delivery Duty, typically have a more 'stout' ride then those that were designed for Long Haul duty.

Also as mentioned, the AH12 do not list the 8.25" rims as an alternative on their information available online. Sure, I could have called and talked with a tech specialist, and suspect they would have said the 8.25" would be OK, perhaps with a lower load rating. (Many other brands of 12R tires, are OK, many without derating of weight loads, for the 8.25" rims.) So that was another factor.

A final observation, when I'm comparing tires, is their weight. I have found the Michelin tires, are usually heavier then those of other manufactures, comparing the same size tires. For example, the XZE*'s are almost 40 lbs heavier then some of the other brands I compared them too. Now just because a tire is heavier, does not make it more robust or safer - however in the case of the Michelin, I do feel they give a more substantial/safer tire then many others. And I did use the weight meaning more material, in the case of the XZE*'s this was in the sidewalls. So to me, I feel this provided an added safety edge. Another example is the two BF Goodrich ST230's I just moved form the Steers to the Tags, these are also quite a bit less weight then the XZE*'s.

Again, weight is not a scientific way to compare, but I personally use it as one of my many criteria for choosing a tire.

On this set of tires, the 6 295/80 XZA2's, I do have a tire that weighs less then the 12R, but went with them due to being 15 months newer Born On Date then the XZE*'s and or ST230's available. And more so because they are rated for Long Haul, and the Michelin Rolling Resistant Site does show them to be 27% lower rolling resistant then the XZE*'s. And many, many reports of owners liking the 'feel of the ride' of the XZA2's. And you see my opinion on the early riding is that they are indeed substantially better riding then either the XZE*'s and or the ST230's, especially from the Steers perspective. And, they feel just as 'sure footed' and 'track well' too.

I also want to point out what a few other posters have said on other tire related sites. Sometimes we can just get too carried away on over analyzing many things about RV components. Most of the tires on the roadway today, are both safe, and will do the job. (Properly inflated and cared for, of course.) So just making a decision and getting out and get going, is what RV'ing is all about. No wrong, no right. And for sure, we all have a right on how we want to spend our money. (And to be clear, I for sure resemble those that seem to overanalyze many areas of RV'ing, tires included. But, that's what I like to do!)

Best to all, be safe, have fun,
Smitty
There is some confusion when it comes to steer tires. The AH12 without the " S" means drive only. Never put them on your steer axle, they are not recommended for over the road use. My guess Michlein does the same thing. Some tires are specific for the steer in long haul, etc use, where the all purpose tire was designed for short haul use, not what we want on our coaches.
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