RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > THE OWNER'S CORNER FORUMS > Monaco Owner's Forum
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-15-2018, 05:46 AM   #2549
Senior Member
 
nodine's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Knoxville, TN, USA
Posts: 3,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by islandboy54 View Post
Your advice and that from everyone here has been invaluable. I adjusted the suspension using the specs you provided and all I can say is WOW. The ride is, by far, the best I have ever had it. Transitions are no problem nor are rough roads. It goes straight and holds a line in 15-20 mph gusty conditions. The front was low (maybe 1 1/2”) and the right rear was also low some (maybe 3/4”).
I have never had Koni shocks on a coach or the combination of shocks and watts you have, so I can only go by what I have read. I think these Bilsteins are really doing the job now. They smooth out the ride nicely now that the air bags are the correct height, and they really limit how much the coach leans in a stiff wind/gust. I let the wind move me over during a strong gust when nobody was around. The amount I had to move the wheel to correct it was a tiny fraction of what it would have been before the shock, tire and ride height changes.
At the moment, I am VERY happy with it and again, appreciate the advice provided in this forum! I will get it weighed in Perry GA this March, adjust the tires as appropriate and see how it does then, but I think it is doing great as it sits.

Thanks again,

Tim
Tim,

Glad to be of help.

Bob
__________________

__________________
Bob and Pam
2006 Diplomat 40PDQ
2013 Silverado Z71 CrewCab
nodine is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-15-2018, 09:46 AM   #2550
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Oroville, CA
Posts: 3,133
Bob, Someone in your group revealed your location in this, or another, thread. Once we got back home (Nov??) I was catching up on emails and found you all had been to Valemont. Hard to miss people in that town!!
__________________

__________________
Bill, Kathi and Zorro; '05 Beaver Patriot Thunder
2012 Sunnybrook Harmony 21FBS (SQEZINN)
2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland
cruzbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 05:00 PM   #2551
Senior Member
 
nodine's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Knoxville, TN, USA
Posts: 3,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by cruzbill View Post
Bob, Someone in your group revealed your location in this, or another, thread. Once we got back home (Nov??) I was catching up on emails and found you all had been to Valemont. Hard to miss people in that town!!
Thanks Bill, was just curious. Yes, that was a small town and as luck would have it (or not), I had to take the wife to the walk in clinic there.

Bob
__________________
Bob and Pam
2006 Diplomat 40PDQ
2013 Silverado Z71 CrewCab
nodine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 08:53 PM   #2552
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,268
Better handling while towing...

For some time now, I’ve wondered if all the slop that is inherent in both the Monaco receiver hitch and many of the bracket kits, has any effect on how well a vehicle tows. Since I had the Q trip coming up and I would have nearly 5000 miles towing, I decided to find out. I tow a 2000 Silverado 1500 Z-71 4WD that weighs nearly 5000#. It has always seemed to me that the truck was jerking the coach almost constantly, due to normal road irregularities. I have a Roadmaster Falcon 10,000 non-binding tow bar.

First problem is that the when the tow bar’s 2” square tubing is plugged into the Monaco receiver, it is really loose. No worse than it is on your standard pickup truck, but really sloppy. I already had installed one of the U-bolt devices that clamps the stinger down in the receiver tube, but they really don’t do much—the 2” tube is still free to wallow around in the receiver. I started by correcting that.

The inside of the 2” tube is approximately 1.5” square, and a piece of 1.5” square steel bar 8” long would slip closely inside it, once I machined a heavy chamfer on all the corners (to accommodate the inside corner radius of the 2” tube) and milled a shallow slot down the length of the bar for the weld ridge left on the inside of the tube. I drilled and tapped a 5/8-11 hole through the bar in the middle of its length. I slid that inside the 2” tube of the tow bar and wedged it in place with a thin shim of wood, so that the tapped hole was accessible through the hole intended for the 5/8” dia hitch pin. I slid that 2” square end of the tow bar into the receiver hitch on the coach and lined up the tapped hole with the hole in the receiver hitch. Using a 5/8-11 x 4” Grade 8 bolt that was fully threaded, and a heavy Grade 8 washer, I tightened the bolt until the stinger was snug in the receiver hitch. I reinstalled a heavier version of the U-bolt hold-down device, tightened it firmly, then finish-tightened the 5/8 Grade 8 bolt. On the end of the bolt sticking out the other side of the receiver hitch, I installed a Nylock nut and washer to retain the bolt in the event it ever came loose.

That took care of the coach receiver and the tow bar.

On the truck, the mounts were very sturdy, and used mounting holes originally for the tow hooks on Z-71 trucks, as well as a 1/2" bolt and nut through the frame several inches behind those tow hook bolts. That made for a very rigid attachment to the truck, with a receiver tube of its own that accepted a 1-1/4” (?) square adapter bracket. That adapter bracket was secured inside the truck’s receiver tube brackets with a 5/8” pin. Again, I inserted a close-fitting steel bar in the adapter bracket that also had a 5/8-11 hole tapped through it. I then fastened the adapter brackets to the truck’s receiver tubes with a similar 5/8-11 Grade 8 bolt and Nylock nut.

Now, when the truck is connected to the coach with its tow bar there is virtually no movement in any of the connections. The construction of the tow bar still allows all the range of motion needed, but with no slop.

RESULTS—Better even than I had hoped. Not only has all the towing apparatus become eerily quiet, I have not felt ANY of the jerking I had experienced before. It’s a very worthwhile modification, IMO. Unfortunately, there are some tow bar designs and tow bar-to-toad connections that may not allow this to be done. But if your setup allows it, I think you will be very pleased with the results.

Unfortunately, I did not take any pix, but maybe I can post pix and a sketch after Q.
__________________
Van W 2000 Dynasty 36, pulling one Harley
Southeastern NC
Vanwill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2018, 09:18 PM   #2553
Senior Member
 
windsorbill's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: CA
Posts: 2,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanwill View Post
For some time now, I’ve wondered if all the slop that is inherent in both the Monaco receiver hitch and many of the bracket kits, has any effect on how well a vehicle tows. Since I had the Q trip coming up and I would have nearly 5000 miles towing, I decided to find out. I tow a 2000 Silverado 1500 Z-71 4WD that weighs nearly 5000#. It has always seemed to me that the truck was jerking the coach almost constantly, due to normal road irregularities. I have a Roadmaster Falcon 10,000 non-binding tow bar.

First problem is that the when the tow bar’s 2” square tubing is plugged into the Monaco receiver, it is really loose. No worse than it is on your standard pickup truck, but really sloppy. I already had installed one of the U-bolt devices that clamps the stinger down in the receiver tube, but they really don’t do much—the 2” tube is still free to wallow around in the receiver. I started by correcting that.

The inside of the 2” tube is approximately 1.5” square, and a piece of 1.5” square steel bar 8” long would slip closely inside it, once I machined a heavy chamfer on all the corners (to accommodate the inside corner radius of the 2” tube) and milled a shallow slot down the length of the bar for the weld ridge left on the inside of the tube. I drilled and tapped a 5/8-11 hole through the bar in the middle of its length. I slid that inside the 2” tube of the tow bar and wedged it in place with a thin shim of wood, so that the tapped hole was accessible through the hole intended for the 5/8” dia hitch pin. I slid that 2” square end of the tow bar into the receiver hitch on the coach and lined up the tapped hole with the hole in the receiver hitch. Using a 5/8-11 x 4” Grade 8 bolt that was fully threaded, and a heavy Grade 8 washer, I tightened the bolt until the stinger was snug in the receiver hitch. I reinstalled a heavier version of the U-bolt hold-down device, tightened it firmly, then finish-tightened the 5/8 Grade 8 bolt. On the end of the bolt sticking out the other side of the receiver hitch, I installed a Nylock nut and washer to retain the bolt in the event it ever came loose.

That took care of the coach receiver and the tow bar.

On the truck, the mounts were very sturdy, and used mounting holes originally for the tow hooks on Z-71 trucks, as well as a 1/2" bolt and nut through the frame several inches behind those tow hook bolts. That made for a very rigid attachment to the truck, with a receiver tube of its own that accepted a 1-1/4” (?) square adapter bracket. That adapter bracket was secured inside the truck’s receiver tube brackets with a 5/8” pin. Again, I inserted a close-fitting steel bar in the adapter bracket that also had a 5/8-11 hole tapped through it. I then fastened the adapter brackets to the truck’s receiver tubes with a similar 5/8-11 Grade 8 bolt and Nylock nut.

Now, when the truck is connected to the coach with its tow bar there is virtually no movement in any of the connections. The construction of the tow bar still allows all the range of motion needed, but with no slop.

RESULTS—Better even than I had hoped. Not only has all the towing apparatus become eerily quiet, I have not felt ANY of the jerking I had experienced before. It’s a very worthwhile modification, IMO. Unfortunately, there are some tow bar designs and tow bar-to-toad connections that may not allow this to be done. But if your setup allows it, I think you will be very pleased with the results.

Unfortunately, I did not take any pix, but maybe I can post pix and a sketch after Q.
Van,

I've often wondered about the slop between the coach and the TOAD. My CRV probably weights around 1/2 of your 1500. It doesn't pull the coach around, but I would think just wear and tear on the parts from it pulling and banging isn't good. I'd like to look at your's at Q and see if I could do something similar.
__________________
Bill & Brigitte
06 Windsor PRQ, Cummins 400 ISL
2014 Honda CRV
windsorbill is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 08:48 AM   #2554
YC1
Senior Member
 
YC1's Avatar


 
Holiday Rambler Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 6,813
My talents are not in the machining world so I just ran a couple of beads, if you can call them beads across the front and rear of the tube that inserts into the receiver.

Plenty of grinding made it fit. Grade 8 bolts hold it in place with no slop.

I have commented several times before I thought the 5K lb Toad may be causing the last of the S turn by it trying to run in a different place on the crown of the road.

Since you brought it up Van, think about a sway bar added to the tow bar much like one would have on a TT. I have come close to buying one a couple of times but alas metal skills and tools just do not make me comfortable building something.
__________________
Myron & Deborah
08 HR Endeavor 40 SKQ
2012 Ford Edge Limited FWD 3.5L
Aluminator tow bar, Demco base plate
YC1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 11:32 AM   #2555
Senior Member
 
Kurt Averill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 135
I definitely need to tighten mine up as well - the tube on the towbar is pretty sloppy. I hear a little noise now and then but don't feel much, I tow a 99 GMC 2500 4X4 that weighs 5800. The pin hole in the hitch is starting to get wallowed out - I think I'll weld up and re-drill the holes, then ad a plate to both side. The hitch for the trailer - made out of solid bar stock is a much better fit - but I think that 10k of trailer works on that pin pretty hard.
__________________
99 Executive 38 - no slides
M11 450 pulling a 28' race car trailer
Kurt Averill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 11:37 AM   #2556
Senior Member
 
Captjake1's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Where I happen to land
Posts: 2,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt Averill View Post
I definitely need to tighten mine up as well - the tube on the towbar is pretty sloppy. I hear a little noise now and then but don't feel much, I tow a 99 GMC 2500 4X4 that weighs 5800. The pin hole in the hitch is starting to get wallowed out - I think I'll weld up and re-drill the holes, then ad a plate to both side. The hitch for the trailer - made out of solid bar stock is a much better fit - but I think that 10k of trailer works on that pin pretty hard.
Had my pin holes repaired. They welded heavy washers on each side.
Here is a few of the anti rattle devices I have.
Click image for larger version

Name:	1516124234051.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	315.1 KB
ID:	188977
__________________
John and Debi
2008 Beaver Contessa, 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee,
28 years retired Fire Captain Tales of the Muttley Crew
Captjake1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 02:17 PM   #2557
Senior Member
 
zmotorsports's Avatar


 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Utah
Posts: 1,913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt Averill View Post
I definitely need to tighten mine up as well - the tube on the towbar is pretty sloppy. I hear a little noise now and then but don't feel much, I tow a 99 GMC 2500 4X4 that weighs 5800. The pin hole in the hitch is starting to get wallowed out - I think I'll weld up and re-drill the holes, then ad a plate to both side. The hitch for the trailer - made out of solid bar stock is a much better fit - but I think that 10k of trailer works on that pin pretty hard.
I have repaired quite a few of these over the years that have become ovaled out and have had really good results machining reducers/spacers out of hardened steel then TIG welding them into the receiver tube on the coach. I actually have a youtube video on my channel showing how I have repaired the stinger as well as the receiver tubing.

Mine on the actual coach hitch has lasted almost 11 years and over 60k miles since I did mine, many of those miles hauling 12,500 pounds of enclosed trailer around. I also run the U-bolt style of anti-rattle device in addition to tightening up the size of the pin holes.

A couple of the earlier ones I repaired didn't actually live very long because I was using standard ER70S-2 tig rod and there wasn't enough elongation in the filler rod. Once I switched over to using 309L TIG rod, they have lasted a very long time. Mine has actually been the longest lasting one I have done as it was the first one I used the 309L rod on.

Mike
__________________
Mike & Chrystal/ 2011 Jeep JKUR
FMCA # F315002
Our 2003 Monaco Dynasty Mods/Repairs Thread
zmotorsports is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 03:29 PM   #2558
Senior Member
 
rmcb's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: N. California
Posts: 820
Van,
What a great idea. I have used the Tow Ready J-Pin with some success but I am sure it is not anywhere near as secure as your idea. It requires a smaller hole drilled in the side of the receiver next to the hitch pin hole. It also loosens up sometimes if I don't really torque the nut down tight.

https://www.etrailer.com/Hitch-Locks...RoCzEUQAvD_BwE
__________________
Roy and Debbie
07 Diplomat 38 PDQ
rmcb is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 06:24 PM   #2559
Senior Member
 
Jeff753's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Coastal Campers
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1,891
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanwill View Post
This pull to the right has me baffled, but I'm sure I'll find the cause of it. Although something like the Blue Ox adjustable unit would "cover up" the problem, I have no interest in a solution like that.



It is a vehicle. It's a large one, but it's still a vehicle, and with a relatively unsophisticated suspension/steering design. It can be made to go straight without pulling, using only what is already installed on the vehicle. I just have not found the answer yet...but either *I* will or *WE* will. There are some really resourceful folks that have contributed to this thread.



If you want to try to understand my confusion about this issue, remember that I had my alignment checked by a local shop that tolerates (perhaps even enjoys dealing with) my idiosyncrasies. Using their late model laser alignment equipment, they showed me that my front end needed NOTHING--it was well within specs. And that my rear end was indeed misaligned, but within specs--1/16" or less. Fast forward, and I have decreased the length of the two rear trailing arms on one side a full 1/2" and the pull to the right is still approximately the same. Removing the STS allowed using much less effort to keep the steering wheel clocked about 20 - 30 degrees left to counteract the pull to the right, but to go straight, the wheel is clocked to the exact position as before changing trailing arm length or removing the STS. So the centering spring in the STS was probably causing so much effort to be required to clock the wheel to the left, but had nothing to do with how much the wheel had to be clocked to counteract the pull to the right.



And bear in mind that I don't just want a "fix", I want to understand what caused the problem in the first place. There is a reasonable answer. We will find it. Thanks for all your thoughts and help.


Just to toss it out there. My pull to the left was caused by a bad travel valve. They should be 16ohms if I recall. It was hard to figure out since when I leveled the problem went away until the bag deflated around a corner and would not inflate again
__________________
Jeff
2001 Monaco Dynasty tag axle
2006 Jeep Wrangler
Jeff753 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2018, 11:06 PM   #2560
Senior Member
 
Happycarz's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 1,824
I did like Myron, but used brazing rod on my previous coach. Sure a lot easier to file to fit.

This coach I use the Blue Ox Immobilizer, which has 2 U bolts to take up the slop both vertically and horizontally.

https://www.etrailer.com/Hitch-Anti-...SABEgIt2vD_BwE

Roy built me some .035” spacer rings to slide onto the shaft of the Blue Ox removable tabs, to which the tow bar attaches. I’ll also slip thin nylon washers between the “fingers” of the tow bar and tabs. All that stacked tolerance cannot be good back there.

But with 90,000 miles on my tow bar, and being a little sloppy, I figured it didn’t owe me anything and put a new one on, 2 months ago.
__________________
Harry

2008 Monaco Camelot 40' PDQ
Happycarz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2018, 10:16 AM   #2561
Senior Member
 
Kurt Averill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by zmotorsports View Post
I have repaired quite a few of these over the years that have become ovaled out and have had really good results machining reducers/spacers out of hardened steel then TIG welding them into the receiver tube on the coach. I actually have a youtube video on my channel showing how I have repaired the stinger as well as the receiver tubing.

Mine on the actual coach hitch has lasted almost 11 years and over 60k miles since I did mine, many of those miles hauling 12,500 pounds of enclosed trailer around. I also run the U-bolt style of anti-rattle device in addition to tightening up the size of the pin holes.

A couple of the earlier ones I repaired didn't actually live very long because I was using standard ER70S-2 tig rod and there wasn't enough elongation in the filler rod. Once I switched over to using 309L TIG rod, they have lasted a very long time. Mine has actually been the longest lasting one I have done as it was the first one I used the 309L rod on.

Mike
Mike, could you post a link to your U-tube video:? I know I have seen some of those but the how and where to find them escapes me right now...
I would have used ER70S-2 as well... but I am only a hobbyist TIGer and probably make frequent errors - I don't fully understand the elongation issue.
__________________
99 Executive 38 - no slides
M11 450 pulling a 28' race car trailer
Kurt Averill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2018, 08:18 AM   #2562
Senior Member
 
zmotorsports's Avatar


 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Utah
Posts: 1,913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt Averill View Post
Mike, could you post a link to your U-tube video:? I know I have seen some of those but the how and where to find them escapes me right now...
I would have used ER70S-2 as well... but I am only a hobbyist TIGer and probably make frequent errors - I don't fully understand the elongation issue.
Gladly Kurt, here is a link to the video I made while repairing a hitch riser. I use the same process when repairing towbar stingers and hitch receivers, I just video'd this as it was easier to access for the video.


As for the rod selection, the ER70S-2 being the proper material choice for the parent material but it was not handling the shock loads that the small reducers were experiencing. Upon showing these cracked welds to my local welding supply rep. and discussing he informed me that by using the 309L and it having a bit more nickel and chromium that when mixed with the mild steel the Martensitic cracking that I was experiencing should be either minimized or possibly eliminated. He mentioned that the small amount of nickel would allow for some elongation and help with the shock loads and the chromium would give the strength. He informed me that when these two are mixed with the mild steel they bring the properties of the molten puddle into their "sweet spot" if you will for strength, elongation as well as being somewhat corrosion resistant, although I don't think the corrosion resistance is actually there being mixed with the molten parent mild steel material. Since using the 309L these repairs have worked out beautifully ever since.

I hope you find the video informative.

Please keep one thing in mind however, I'm a mechanic and NOT a videographer.

Mike
__________________

__________________
Mike & Chrystal/ 2011 Jeep JKUR
FMCA # F315002
Our 2003 Monaco Dynasty Mods/Repairs Thread
zmotorsports is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.