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Old 11-24-2018, 10:20 AM   #29
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If you're ever in a dire situation and close to gelling your fuel system you can always do what we and many others have done since we were able to buy diesel tractors

The first ones were fuel that started on gas then you switched, many earlier ones had pony motors

We added 1 gallon of regular gasoline to 50 gallons diesel and never had to change filters due to gelling

No engine problems whatsoever

Keeping additive on hand plus purchasing treated fuel is ideal but just in case the gas dilution solves the paraffin issue
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Old 11-24-2018, 10:38 AM   #30
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I do remember doing that in my old truck driving days, but I'm not sure if these modern diesel engines will tolerate that. I suppose in an emergency I might try it.

In a past diesel engine, Isuzu 6BD1, I actually used "Heat" to melt the gel. It worked as well but I was desperate.

Thing is these engines today are a lot more expensive to replace. The old Cummings could be resleaved if you scored a cylinder.
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Old 11-24-2018, 09:51 PM   #31
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I do remember doing that in my old truck driving days, but I'm not sure if these modern diesel engines will tolerate that. I suppose in an emergency I might try it.

In a past diesel engine, Isuzu 6BD1, I actually used "Heat" to melt the gel. It worked as well but I was desperate.

Thing is these engines today are a lot more expensive to replace. The old Cummings could be resleaved if you scored a cylinder.
With the exception of the Cummins(no g)6.7L ISB engine, which is a parent-bore, all others are wet sleeves, ie: the sleeves may be replaced.
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Old 11-24-2018, 10:11 PM   #32
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BIO-Diesel (straight) begins to "cloud" @ 32 deg (f)
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:14 PM   #33
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With the exception of the Cummins(no g)6.7L ISB engine, which is a parent-bore, all others are wet sleeves, ie: the sleeves may be replaced.

Going back a few more years, the B-series 5.9L engines are also parent bore.


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Old 11-26-2018, 09:36 AM   #34
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Thank you for all the feed back... I had no idea, about diesel freezing/gelling... I have now dump a bottle of Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement Antigel + Cetane Boost the white bottle... into the tank and top off tank with fuel and ran both motors/ generator... I am feeling better prepare...
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Old 12-01-2018, 12:54 PM   #35
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As noted earlier, biodiesel is especially sensitive to freezing. I believe it's related to having a lot more water content for the cold to work on.
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Old 12-03-2018, 06:32 AM   #36
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I had an 01" Cummins and fuel gelled which was my fault because I kept putting off putting anti-gel in tank thinking temps aren't that bad.
I came out from my doctors appointment an hour and half later, jumped in truck cranked it over and it started but then did the dreaded sputter spit hack cough then nada . I Kicked myself for two days for not putting ant-gel in tank and not having a vehicle till temps got warm enough to thaw out fuel sys., Since I no longer stay at 8500' in CO. during winter I don't worry about it anymore
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Old 12-03-2018, 06:37 AM   #37
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As noted earlier, biodiesel is especially sensitive to freezing. I believe it's related to having a lot more water content for the cold to work on.


More likely the vegetable oil itself, leave a bottle of veg oil in the fridge even and it will go cloudy.

Those running SVO (Straight Vegetable Oil) often have heated tanks and fuel filters. (Which also make it runnier)
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Old 12-03-2018, 06:45 AM   #38
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It's a new world with this biodiesel . I personally used addictive year round. Because of it
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Old 12-03-2018, 03:18 PM   #39
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Diesel has long had "winter" formulations in colder/Northern climates. Look for "Winter" diesel marked on fuel pumps or #1 diesel. "Regular" diesel is sometimes referred to as #2 diesel and is considered effective to about -7 degrees Celsius or about 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

Or just add fuel conditioner as noted above if you can't reliably find winter diesel or already have fuel in a large quantity in your tanks.

I can't comment on the cloud point of biodiesel (B100), B5 diesel or winter diesel (containing no biodiesel) but I do know from loading tankers full of fuel that biodiesel containing fuels have a higher density than the base product.

Also the paraffin in diesel fuel (used to raise the BTUs in the fuel) is a larger contributor to low temperature freezing or clouding issues as it will precipitate out of suspension.
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Old 12-06-2018, 04:24 PM   #40
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Just use the stanadyne performance formula in the right concentration and you won't have to worry about a thing; it's made by company that makes diesel fuel injection so you're fine with it.
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Old 12-06-2018, 05:23 PM   #41
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We getting a late start to leave from Toledo to head down south and I was recently in a Love's truck stop and saw a lot of diesel fuel additives for sell to prevent Diesel fuel from freezing and Gelling, which would clogged fuel filter and lines... What are your thoughts??? I have a 360 cunning's on a Freightliner... 2010 Phaeton/Tiffin
Companies the make fuel additives are in business for only one reason to make a profit.
Read this diesel fuel lubricity additive ISO study: https://www.dieselplace.com/forum/76...y-results.html
When cold weather arrives at your state, diesel fuel for cold weather is already being sold there.
I've been driving diesel engine-powered vehicles for over 25 years, I've never had a fuel-gelling issue, either from leaving warm weather to cold weather, or staying home all year and having summer blend fuel in my tractors during winter.
The single-most important thing to do is keep the fuel tank as full as possible when it's not running to avoid moisture in the fuel from condensation in a partial tank of fuel
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Old 12-06-2018, 05:57 PM   #42
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Diesel Fuel Supplement

It may be a different problem, but sometimes I need to add the supplement to the tank, because the engine starts to buck. Sometimes it's after a fill up, or after the rig has sat a while between trips. Most of my driving is in Calif or Oregon during the summer. I was told the problem was because of moisture in the fuel. So I carry a couple bottles and put some in whenever I encounter the problem. I usually get it at WalMart. (The stuff stinks though and I wish I could find some paper throw away funnels that have a 90 degree goose neck, which I need to pour it into my tank, because I can continue to smell the stuff on the plastic funnel I use and which is carried in my storage bin.)
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