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Old 04-28-2017, 09:35 AM   #1
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1992 P30 454 TBI exhaust manifold removal

I'm getting ready to start the dreadful exhaust manifold removal on my 92 Southwind. What kind of tips and tricks can you guys offer before I dive into this. I know I have bolts broken off and they are leaking at those points. Here are my plans for right now and tell me if I'm on the right track. I've been coating the bolts with spray Kroil past couple days, hoping I can gain better access to them by taking the front tire off and coming in from the bottom side. I'm not going with headers right now because I do not want to have to redo my whole exhaust system at this point. I'm hoping the manifolds are not cracke and I can just have them surfaced. Right now unless I hear different from you guys, I do not plan on using manifold gaskets. I plan on using a thin layer of red RTV between manifold and head.

Any more input you all can offer is greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Jason
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Old 04-28-2017, 12:09 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason1955 View Post
I'm getting ready to start the dreadful exhaust manifold removal on my 92 Southwind. What kind of tips and tricks can you guys offer before I dive into this. I know I have bolts broken off and they are leaking at those points. Here are my plans for right now and tell me if I'm on the right track. I've been coating the bolts with spray Kroil past couple days, hoping I can gain better access to them by taking the front tire off and coming in from the bottom side. I'm not going with headers right now because I do not want to have to redo my whole exhaust system at this point. I'm hoping the manifolds are not cracke and I can just have them surfaced. Right now unless I hear different from you guys, I do not plan on using manifold gaskets. I plan on using a thin layer of red RTV between manifold and head.

Any more input you all can offer is greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Jason
I did some on a 80 Itasca many years ago. Getting the broke off bolts out will probably be a challenge, but can be done. I trued my manifolds with a very large file, took quite a while. I also used gaskets made buy felpro, not header gaskets, as they won't work too well. I put 10,000 miles on that coach after the repair with no problems.
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Old 04-29-2017, 12:43 PM   #3
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To remove the exhaust bolts on my '93 Bounder, I used an impact wrench with 100% success. Use very low air pressure at first so that the bolt is just being tapped on for a couple minutes, then increase the air pressure 10 lbs and again let it tap on the bolt for a couple minutes. Doing this for 2 or 3 minutes on each bolt for every increase in air pressure. All the bolts eventually just backed nicely out at some point. When the air pressure was increased to a point where they should normally back out I increased the time to let the wrench tap away on the bolt.
Just cannot remember at what pressure the bolts began to turn, but it was no where near bolt breaking pressures. At first I tried a socket with a ratchet wrench and breaker bar, but stopped short of the point where I knew much more would snap the bolt.
This impact process took approximately 15 minutes per bolt. Patience is of utmost importance.
Like you mentioned I removed the wheels and access was easy.
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