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Old 03-29-2005, 07:28 PM   #1
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I see so many critical posts on RV.NET regarding the Michelin XRV 235/80R 22.5 tires. People switching brand new tires for Goodyears and so on. Why would WH put these tires on thousands of chassis' if they weren't any good?
What is your take on this?
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Old 03-29-2005, 07:28 PM   #2
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I see so many critical posts on RV.NET regarding the Michelin XRV 235/80R 22.5 tires. People switching brand new tires for Goodyears and so on. Why would WH put these tires on thousands of chassis' if they weren't any good?
What is your take on this?
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Old 03-30-2005, 01:15 AM   #3
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boulderado, Welcome to irv2 Every coach I have owned, 6 of them, all have had Michelin tires, people complained about other sizes also. Maybe its because they don't use proper air inflations or have no idea how much weight they are carrying over each axel.
I have found that proper maintenence of your tires will give you more safe free miles, an age will be the determining factor,in having to replace them.---"007"
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Old 03-30-2005, 02:32 AM   #4
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I think Michelin has gotten a bad reputation but it's not their fault. I recently called them to clarify the inflation guide online and they sent me the RV tire guide in the mail. Over and over they repeat inflation and proper blocking.

I think too many RV owners neglect their tires on their RV just like they do on their cars. On a heavy vehicle tire care is critical to safe operation. An RV is not just a big car.

Often RV's are only driven 4k - 5k miles per year. After 6 years the tread on the tires still looks good with only 30k miles but the tires need to be replaced due to other factors. However many people only look at tread depth and assume the tires are good, then bang... a blow out. It isn't a good idea, but you can often get away with this on a car becasue they are much lighter. On any heavy vehicle old tires are an accident waiting to happen.

Consequently I think the reputation the XRVs in particular have gotten is due to the "it can't possibly be my fault" attitude coming from the "blame the manufacturer when anything goes wrong" crowd.
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Old 03-30-2005, 05:55 AM   #5
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by boulderado:
I see so many critical posts on RV.NET regarding the Michelin XRV 235/80R 22.5 tires. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>boulderado, I hope therefore that you will see that iRV2 presents solutions for real issues that effect the members.

Michelin XRVs are good tires. They are specifically engineered to be RV tires. Michelin makes so many different types of tires that their competency with our RV tires should not be subject to mass hysteria or speculation.

As suggested and as placarded on the tire itself "check and maintain the inflation pressures" (like your life depends on it) and your tires will serve you well through their life expectancy.
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Old 04-05-2005, 04:44 PM   #6
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I don't care how long the tires last, I will never own another Michelin for my RV.

Dealing with Michelin customer service, is like ...... well they don't pick thier employees based on thier IQ.

Per their chart, I should have 80 lbs in front and 75 lbs. in rear. Manufacturer (National RV) says 85 lbs.

Michlen will NOT help me unless I know the weight on EACH tire. I spent over 3 hours on the phone and a lot of Internet looking, and nobody will weigh a coach that way. The few that had scales with side access, said they were concern with damage to their scales. On the "other" RV site, there are a lot of people that say, just wait until get to a ralley.

Michelin says since I don't know the weight on EACH tire, then I must go the maximum pressure of 110 lbs - which I'm sure will make for an awful ride.

I've called MD State Police, gravel companies, moving companies, truck stop scales, and no such luck. Where does Michelin get off on their demand for weight. If they want it weighed that way, then they should furnish a list of public scales that can weigh that way.

Besides what is mentioned above, does any one else have a suggestion?

Thanks,
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Old 04-05-2005, 05:11 PM   #7
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Blue Ribbon:
Michelin says since I don't know the weight on EACH tire, then I must go the maximum pressure of 110 lbs - which I'm sure will make for an awful ride. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Getting weighed is easy. try a truck stop on the Interstate. Most of them have scales. If you know how much weight you have on the front and rear axle, you can inflate for that weight or above it.

Try inflating your motorhome to the GAWRs of both axles. Now if you did what Michelin suggested, inflate to 110 psi, that would be the minimum pressure to support 9350 pounds on the front axle and 17640 pounds for the rear axle.

You and I both know the front axle of your MH doesn't weigh 9350 SO what do we do about that. If you have an 8500 rated front axle you could choose to run 95 psi in the front. This is the minimum pressure to support 8320 pounds.

Your 8341 has an 8000 front axle and a 15000 rear axle. To effectively support the Gross Axle Weight Rating GAWR on your MH you may choose to run, 90 psi each tire on the rear axle and 90 psi in each front tire.

With truck and RV tires you need to be concerned with "minimum inflation pressure" to support the maximum weight.
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Old 04-06-2005, 03:16 AM   #8
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I appreciate the difficulty in getting individual "corner" weights. The CAT scales I have visted won't allow me to weigh that way. A few even have installed curbs so you can't even try it. However it doesn't matter if you have Michelins, Goodyears or Toyo you face the same dilemna.

Tire pressures on any axle should be the same - left and right on the front axle and all four on the rear axle. However to determine the minimum acceptable pressure, you need to know the maximum weight any single tire will be carrying. Until you can provide that weight, no manufacturer will tell what minimum pressure to use and if I were in their position, I wouldn't either.

Driver has given some good advice on how to estimate a general pressure that you could use but until you know the corner weights it will be just that... an estimate.

The RV may have a sticker from the builder that suggests tire pressures which can also be used as an estimate based on UVW (as delivered from the factory weight). Since the builder doesn't know how you will load it, they aren't in a position to provide an exact pressure for your rig as you use it. However you can use their recommendations as a starting point.

This month's FMCA magazine has an article on tires which for the most part provides a good explanation of tires and issues with RVs. I have a minor problem with some parts of the article but in general terms it is worth the read.

Since I haven't yet been able to get corner weights I am running slightly higher than my recommended pressures given on the sticker GBM placed just inside the driver's door. I am well under the maximum pressure stated on the sidewall of the tire itself but consider myself safe given my estimate of corner weight based on a worse case guess. It is better to be slightly over pressured compared to slightly under pressured as long as you are below the maximum pressure stated on the tire itself.

Once you find a pressure you feel good with, check the tires often, especialy on the rear axle where inside vs. outside dually pressure differences can shorten tire life.

This is important stuff so it good that you are putting the effort into getting it right.

Good luck!
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Old 04-06-2005, 04:59 AM   #9
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Other than a rough ride what are the objections to airing up XRV tires to the max pressure printed on the sidewall?
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Old 04-06-2005, 05:02 AM   #10
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I have called every public scale I can find in the phone book and there doesn't seem to be any place to have all 4 corners weighed in my area. Would it be possible for the motorhome manufacturers to give you a 4 corner weight as shipped and then you could make an educated guess as you loaded up your MH.
It would make life a little easier.
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Old 04-06-2005, 05:10 AM   #11
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Lesstech, you might try getting a 4 corner weight from a local moving & storage company (they often have a set of portable scales). Or perhaps a sand & gravel pit (where you can weigh one corner, back off, weigh another corner, back off, etcetera). I called my local Highway Patrol post and inquired where they were planning to do some spot-checks of trucks on the interstate; I met them out at a closed weigh station and they weighed all 4 corners with four portable scales. No charge.
Which ever way you go, remember it's good to have "documentation". -Some sort of paperwork with the date, your coach vin#, the tester N&A, etcetera.
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Old 04-06-2005, 05:31 AM   #12
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Thanks Troth. I'll give that a try.
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Old 04-06-2005, 05:53 AM   #13
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I went down to my local grain elevator and for $15 I got the front, rear, whole coach, left front, left side, left rear, right front ride side and right rear weighed.
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Old 04-06-2005, 11:18 AM   #14
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Scooter:
Other than a rough ride what are the objections to airing up XRV tires to the max pressure printed on the sidewall? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

From many angles it is much better to run too much air rather than too little. However, over inflation has it's own problems, albeit they tend to be much less troublesome in nature.

One consideration is that road contact is reduced with over inflation. With more air than required, the tire is not compressed to the ground like it is designed to be for that air pressure. This doesn't hurt the tire so much as it can impact braking, steering and handling especially in bad weather (wet roads).

If the weight of the load is light enough, the reduced road contact area might develop irregular wear patterns in the tread in the long term. It might also cause the center of the tread area to bear more load compared to the edges of the tread which can, in some cases lead to premature problems.

A second consideration as you mentioned is that the ride will be much rougher with maximum air pressure.

In general, over inflatation issues are more subtle and tend to occur over the life of tire and often go undetected before the tire needs to be replaced due to age or tread depth. When in doubt it is much safer to run with too much pressure compared to too little, just don't exceed the max. air stated on the tire.
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