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Old 11-03-2012, 12:30 AM   #1
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W22 DIY Rear Trac

2004 Workhorse DIY Rear Trac


The 2004 Fleetwood Flair with the Workhorse W22 chassis and Chevy Vortec 8.1 L V8 gas engine has a perceived problem with stability when subjected to side pressure such as wind gusts or a passing large vehicle like a semi.

To counter this issue, aftermarket suppliers have produced nicely designed rear tracking devices that may be installed on the vehicle for a price (from $350 or so and up, plus installation) which is exorbitant in my opinion.

Taking-off from other DIY projects in the various RV forums, I have designed my own Rear Trac device, using
- 36" of 0.25" x 1.5" mild steel cold rolled flat stock (I used less than 30".)
- 6.5" of 0.25"x4" mild steel plate stock
- an adjustable three-point hitch center link that adjusts from 13 - 18" for 0.625" pins
- 2 M14x2x55mm 10.9 bolts
- 2 M14x2x90mm 10.9 bolts
- 2 0.625"x2.5" Grade 8 bolts
- 2 0.5"x1" Grade 5 bolts
- 4 0.375"x1" Grade 5 bolts.

DESIGN

Since the huge exhaust pipe passes through this area on the passenger side, I would have to go above the differential and to the driverís side frame rail. But there are several pipes, including one brake line on the frame rail which are in the way. I placed a straight edge between the flat surface at the top of the differential (Iíll call it the vertical guide tab) and down to the frame rail to locate the center of the adjustable link relative to the frame rail and marked the location on the rail. It appeared that the distance from the frame rail to the center of that tab on top of the differential would be easily within the range of the adjustable link. I decided to aim for approximately 14.25" to allow some adjustability of the link. This would also put everything on the opposite side away from the exhaust pipe - so no fear of damaging the Trac or the exhaust pipe.

The problem was that the brake line would have to be relocated. I envisioned a 0.25" plate sliding in behind the pipes, but low enough so that the bolts holding it to the frame would be accessible without interfering with any of the pipes. Most of the pipes were high enough so they passed above the bracket location, but the brake line was in the middle of it. I tested my ability to Ďrelocateí the pipe by attempting to bend it by hand and it seemed pliable enough (careful to not put a kink in it.

So I decided to go ahead with this design - a 0.25" plate bent at 90 degrees at 3.25" to fit into the
of the frame rail. This would allow two vertical 0.25"x1.5" stubs 3" long to provide the pin to the frame rail for the adjustable link. Then 0.25"x1.5" stubs 2" long ground to fit the bend radius of the 0.25" plate inserted behind it against the plate and welded together. I would use four 0.375" x 1" grade 5 bolts to hold the plate to the vertical part of the frame rail and two 0.5" x 1" grade 5 bolts to hold the plate to the frame railís flange. (Actually, this wasnít the original design, but I donít want to describe the iterations that got to this.)

As I looked at the differential, I noticed that the top two bolts were offset from the other bolts by what I measured to be very close to 1" and that two bolts on the passenger side were in-line enough so that it appeared that I could install a straight flat steel piece on them straight to the area where the link would have to be attached. Similarly, the two bolts on the top of the differential were also lined up so that a straight flat steel piece could be placed over them. Also, the distance of 1" was exactly what was needed for the adjustable link spacing, or so I thought.

Most of the other DIY designs referred to 0.5" grade 8 bolts. I noticed that the bolts on mine were marked Ď10.9' which is metric. I pulled one of the metric bolts from my Spicer S110 differential to see if I could find bolts to fit. The short ones needed to be replaced with 0.25" longer bolts than were in there, as do the longer ones. The surprising thing was that the threads allowed a half inch SAE bolt to fit and pull tight, but these bolts were about half way between half inch and 5/8" bolts, measuring about 0.55" - they are M14 x 2 (thread pitch). I reread the OEMY siteís recommendation and noticed he warned about using metric to replace metric, so I dropped the idea of using 0.5" SAE, besides, I donít think that they would hold against 150 ft-lbs.

So on with the search. The short ones were 1.625" long and the long ones 2.75" long, which meant I need 1.875" and 3" metrics or 47.6 mm and 76.2 mm. I went to Loweís and to Home Depot, but couldnít find anything in the M14 range that were 10.9 hardness. I ended up at a fastener specialty store that had 10.9s; M14x2x55mm and M14x2x90mm, but that was as close as he could get to what I needed. So I took them, along with some hardened steel washers to use for spacers - one on each of the shorter bolts and four on each of the longer bolts. OK, should work.

(Very fortuitous, I needed the two longer bolts to be longer and I needed the washers because I had not anticipated that though the spacing was one inch, both of the bracket pieces had to be outside of that one inch, but in fact only one was - the other was inside so the net distance was 0.75" and the washers would be needed to move the driverís side differential bracket forward by 3 washer thicknesses! But I get ahead of myself.)

FABRICATION

To begin this step, I measured the distance between the two shorter bolts on the passenger side, 3.75", and the distance to the top of the vertical guide tab at the top of the differential, allowing one inch for the distance from the lower hole center to the end of the bracket, was 9". The upper end needed to be cut vertically from the 9" point. I cut the piece on a 45 degree upward angle (about 10.25" on the upper edge) using a 7" metal cutting wheel in my Skil saw. I then located the first hole one inch from the square end (all drilled 0.625" holes are centered on the stock) and the other hole 3.75" up from it. I drilled these holes out to 0.625" and tried it on the differential. I anticipated from my measurements that I would have to grind off a portion of the part at the point where it passed by the casting near the first longer bolt. I ground out about a 0.2"x 0.5" area to allow the flat piece to sit in properly. I installed the original metric washers against the differential and installed the old bolts to just tight.

I clamped a short piece of 0.25" stock onto the end of the first piece and verified that it was virtually level (nearly parallel to a flat edge laid between the frame rails). Whether it is actually level is not that important, but it should be close. Using the anticipated 14.25"adjustable linkís measurement, I estimated the approximate location of the frame rail end of the link and determined the position of the center of the hole at the differential by marking the 14.25" location on that piece of stock. The distance on mine was 1.625" so I cut a piece of 0.25"x1.5" stock 2.625" long for that piece. I drilled the 0.625" hole one inch from one end and beveled the other end for welding (both sides - only about 0.1" should remain not beveled) . I then removed the other piece from the differential and ground the edges of the 45 degree end to prepare them for welding. I clamped these onto the welding surface, positioned so that the flat end of the short piece is flush with the top edge of the 45 degree angle, which makes the bottom edge approximately 0.375 - 0.5" above the vertical guide tab on the differential.

The second bracket was supposed to be a flat piece over the two bolts, but the location of the adjustable link was so close to the center that this method used here looked easier. (The first bracket was installed using the new bolts, the original washer between the differential flange and the bracket, and the hardened spacer washers on the outside. I tightened these two bolts to near the torque value required before the other two bolts were removed.) I inserted the bolt through the hole in the first bracket, and with the adjustable link in place, tightened the nut on it so that it was firmly in place. I measured the distance from the center of the link bolt to the center of the driverís side bolt, which was 4.125". I added 2" for the ends and cut a piece of 0.25"x1.5" stock 6.125" long, marked and drilled two 0.625" holes 1" from each end.

I installed the piece on the link bolt and used the original metric washer behind and the first longer bolt removed to position the part so that the length of the other leg of the part could be determined. The length was 2.125" and so a piece 3.125" was cut, the hole marked and drilled one inch from one end. I installed the piece on the bolt near the center and determined that it would fit properly, tightly against the other leg of the part. I then marked both of them for positioning. After removing, beveling the areas on both pieces for welding, I located them using the marks I had made, welded them together and ground them flat. I reassembled the pieces as shown in the picture, using the original metric washer against the differential and the new bolts and washers only to discover that the parts were out of alignment by about 0.25" as described earlier. By judicious rearrangement of the washers (the original metric washer, followed by 3 hardened washers on the rearward side of the bracket part and one hardened washer forward of the bracket part), the assembly was complete and fit. I then tightened all of the new bolts to 125 - 150 ft-lbs with Loctite.


Now to make the frame rail bracketís backing plate, I used a 4" wide by 6.5"piece of mild steel stock - the 0.25" material was very difficult to bend. I heated it cherry red and bent it a little at a time in a large vise, heating it continuously while maintaining bending pressure until the 90 degree angle was achieved. The radius of the bend was about 0.5" to match that of the frame rail. I repeated this process on the short flange to provide a half inch stiffener flange.

Then I drilled the holes in the back using a small drill bit to provide pilot holes and to provide a pattern for drilling the frame rail. I also drilled the pilot holes in the flange of the part. I located the center and marked the locations of the vertical pieces on both flanges of the part. The centers of the holes are located 0.625" down from the upper edge and 0.625" over from the vertical edge. The centers of the lower bolt holes were located 1.5" down from the upper holes and inward from the vertical edges by 0.625". The pilot holes were less than 0.25" in diameter. The flange bolt holes were located 2" from the back of the backing plate and half of the space between the edge and the vertical stock pieces, or 0.625" to the center.

I used the backing plate as a pattern to drill the holes in the frame rail before the parts were welded together. I located the center points of the flange bolts by marking the locations where the backing plate edges hit the frame rail flange with the backing plate clamped in place, and also where the flangeís inner edge contacts the backing plate. I then measured along the flange 0.625" and inwards on the flange by the amount from the flange edge mark on the backing plate to the center of the pilot hole.

I center-punched the locations and drilled through the flange with the small pilot bit, reaming out the pilot hole in the backing plate. I also drilled the holes in the backing plate through the frame railís vertical web. I removed the backing plate and drilled the holes in the vertical web to the next size larger than 0.375" and the flange holes to 0.5". The holes in the backing plate were drilled out using a drill press (much easier) to these same sizes.

I cut two pieces of 0.25" x1.5" stock 3" long to serve as the adjustable link tie point and I cut two pieces of 0.25"x1.5" stock 2" long to use as spacers from the tie point pieces to the back of the part. I beveled the edges of the pieces to be welded and clamped them to the welding table to weld them. After they cooled, I ground them off flat and rounded the lower edges of the spacers so that they would fit into the frame rail bracketís backing plate.

I drilled 0.625" holes in both of the tie point weldment pieces and assembled the link end with its bolt to hold everything in place. (It is a good idea to put an extra washer in the assembly to give some space between the two pieces so the link can be slipped between the parts.)

I then clamped the assembled parts together and aligned them according to the markings I had made and welded them together. I avoided welding along the parts next to the half-inch holes because it is too close - I welded it on the inside all the way.

INSTALLATION

I already indicated that the two 0.25" brackets attached to the differential were installed while they were being fabricated and the first was used as a jig to locate and construct the second bracket.

The frame rail weldment can now be installed by placing it on the frame rail flange forward of the final location and then slide it rearward to position it over the drilled holes. The pipes have to be pulled, pushed or bent out of the way to get the weldment into place. The pipes must not be allowed to come close to the parts or the hardware (bolts and nuts).

The 0.375" fasteners are installed through the outside of the frame rail web without washers behind them (it might be necessary to ream the holes to get the holes to align), through the backing plate of the weldment. Install a lock washer under each nut and use Loctite if so inclined.
Install the 0.5" bolts through the frame rail flange and through the bottom flange of the weldment (it might be necessary to ream the holes to get the holes to align). Install a lock washer under each nut and Loctite if so inclined.

ADJUSTMENT

If you havenít already done so, park the coach on a level spot, moving it back and forth to assure that the suspension is stabilized (not sure how much good that does). Then install the adjustable link using 0.625" grade 8 bolts that are 2.25 to 2.5" long with a lock washer under the nut on each end of the adjustable link. No other washers should be needed and Loctite may be used if desired. The nuts may be installed either facing forward or rearward, I chose forward on the differential end and rearward on the frame rail end, mainly because they are easier to access.

The adjustable link may be installed with either the left-hand-threaded or the right-hand-threaded end towards the frame rail side. The jam nut is on the right-hand-threaded end and since the frame rail end is most accessible, I installed the link with the right-hand-threaded end towards the frame rail. This design should result in the link being slightly downward to the frame rail when the coach is unloaded. Loaded, it should be almost perfectly level.

Now move the jam nut away from the link (toward the pivot point) and adjust the link outward until the link tightens. Tighten the jam nut against the adjustable link body. Hold the body (mine came with a pin that inserts into a hole in the body) and use a Crescent wrench to tighten the jam nut against the body. Loctite may be used, but should be unnecessary.

I made a test run of a few miles and was very pleased with the result, but I need to run with the toad behind and over rougher terrain.

Note: I submitted this with pictures but they weren't accepted (too much space I guess. I have this in pdf - pm me if you want to see it or tell me how to get them in here.)
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Old 11-04-2012, 07:08 PM   #2
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Here is one view of the finished frame bracket. See finished differential brackets here. Here is another view of the Frame Bracket. Here is a view of the final assembly of the trac stabilizer.
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Old 11-04-2012, 10:56 PM   #3
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Nice job. I wish I had made my own but, as usual, I put it off too long and was forced to buy a manufactured one. I'm very pleased with the bar but would have saved a lot of money.

Thanks for sharing,
Dave
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Old 11-06-2012, 09:26 AM   #4
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Although I admire the creativity, manufacturing, editorial and talent that went into the production of the DIY unit, I am not swayed that people make bad decisions when they opt for a commercial track bar.

I have a Henderson Track bar. It's about 50% longer than the DIY unit shown and whether or not at the end of the day that makes a big difference I would leave to the engineering types however I expect that when I extend my jacks the longer track bar link allows greater motion with less moments on the attachment points. I would have to prove that out using sensors but that's how I see it.

One of the other benefits of a commercial bar I believe is that the bar is mounted in huge neoprene bushings and the link is not mechanically connected to the frame. This feature has been proven on test equipment to absorb the transient shocks that will be realized when the vehicle is impacted by road conditions. Decoupling as much as possible road shock to the differential housing is one of the key marketing features that the suppliers of the device will publish.

This design feature is incorporated in Tiger Trak, SuperSteer, UltraTrak, Tru-Track and ever other commercial track bar on the market. I am of the opinion that I don't want to dismiss this design feature as redundant or window dressing. I believe it's a sound fundamental engineering principal.
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Old 11-06-2012, 05:58 PM   #5
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DriVer: Sorry, I did not intend to malign anyone's purchase of the 'real' thing. I just said that I thought it too expensive for what you get.

Your points are well taken - and I only followed the DIY bandwagon which appears to be encouraged by many miles of successful use. I certainly will watch for any of the things that you spoke about.

In my short trial, it seems to work ok.

As far as leaving things to engineers, I am one - but old. I don't think most of the folks on here would disagree that being an engineer does not guarantee successful designs. I have run into plenty of really poor designs on machinery (for farming) and automotive stuff, including motorhomes and household stuff. Unintended (or unexpected) consequences I believe it is called. For example, I was not impressed with the Blue Ox clamp-on bracket, but I think I understand why they use it.

I would expect that in a straight up-and-down bounce, the frame would experience some immediate damping from the trac bar and could cause the back end to waggle a bit more than it might otherwise.

I should also point out that I don't believe that the longer 'link' would work in my situation because there is a great big exhaust pipe going through the area which would surely interfere.

If I notice a bad effect or a set of effects from this - I can take it off easily, and not be out very much - less than $100. Right now, it looks like it is still positive.
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Old 11-07-2012, 08:06 AM   #6
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Mike... is not a DIY kinda guy!

It took me over a year to get him to use a 1 qt oil filter.

I won't even get into the fuel filter issue.
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:34 PM   #7
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Nice job Jwwing and thanks for sharing how you did it. It does look like and sounds like a lot of work. I do have to admit, between all the measuring, work, crawling back and forth under the MH, chasing the correct parts or buying one for $500 is something to think about even though I sometimes enjoy fabricating and building my own stuff.
Is it necessary to bolt the bracket to the differential with 4 bolts? 2 would not be strong enough?

I've always thought my P-32 handled just fine and wondered why so many MH owners needed all the aftermarket sway bars , track bars , steering stabilizers etc but if it's windy, my MH is no fun to drive, in fact it can get plain scary. I thought this was just the nature of the beast, a great big box that is relatively lightweight. I really have no experience to know if a track bar may significantly help in this situation.
If I did break down and buy one, I'd like to get it from Brazels because those guys have been helpful to lots of us here on the forum. Their price on this is competetive, any one used their Ultra Track Bar?
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by max49 View Post
Is it necessary to bolt the bracket to the differential with 4 bolts? 2 would not be strong enough??
4 bolts are consistent with the commercial track bars on the market. My setup uses 4 bolts. 2 bolts would walk, therefore the number of bolts used in the DIY is appropriate.
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:47 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by max49 View Post
Nice job Jwwing and thanks for sharing how you did it. It does look like and sounds like a lot of work. I do have to admit, between all the measuring, work, crawling back and forth under the MH, chasing the correct parts or buying one for $500 is something to think about even though I sometimes enjoy fabricating and building my own stuff.
Is it necessary to bolt the bracket to the differential with 4 bolts? 2 would not be strong enough?

I've always thought my P-32 handled just fine and wondered why so many MH owners needed all the aftermarket sway bars , track bars , steering stabilizers etc but if it's windy, my MH is no fun to drive, in fact it can get plain scary. I thought this was just the nature of the beast, a great big box that is relatively lightweight. I really have no experience to know if a track bar may significantly help in this situation.
If I did break down and buy one, I'd like to get it from Brazels because those guys have been helpful to lots of us here on the forum. Their price on this is competetive, any one used their Ultra Track Bar?
i purchased my ultra track rear track bar from brazels and installed it myself.
it comes complete with all the longer bolts and hardware necessary for the installation.
the differential bolts are loctited and very hard to break loose. a regular 1/2'' drive pneumatic impact wrench would not do the job. i used my 3/4'' drive torque wrench. aside from that, the installation was straight forward and relatively easy.
the track bar makes a huge improvement in straight line handling, not just in crosswinds, etc.
before the installation, i could watch my trailer hitch ball wander from side to side constantly with my back up camera. it tracks steady now.
i really like the track bar.
there are pictures of my installation in the archives of this forum.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:01 PM   #10
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Dan, do you have a tip for keywords to search for? "Ultra track rear track bar installation" only brought me back here.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:30 PM   #11
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Max,

On my web site in the Downloads are the install docs for the front & rear trac bars.
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:02 AM   #12
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Dan, do you have a tip for keywords to search for? "Ultra track rear track bar installation" only brought me back here.
max,
i cannot find the post either. i installed the track bar in may 2010.
i torqued the pumpkin bolts to 120'#, the frame bracket to 100#', and the torque arm bolts to 175#'.
oemy sells the ultra track bar on his website. he also has pics and installation instructions.

Oemy's Web Site - UltraTrac

http://oemys-performance.com/media/u...%20install.pdf
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:27 AM   #13
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Au Oh, I don't see a selection for the P-32, only W-20-22-24 on Dales site.
Gotta go to work, will look more tonight.
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:48 AM   #14
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max49: though I don't necessarily disagree with DriVer on the 4-bolt question, I used four bolts so that I could feel confident using 1/4" stock mild steel. I have built machinery for farm use that turned out to need stronger material and found that unforeseen happenings caused them to be destroyed where normal use they were fine.

In this case, the 1/4" x 1.5" material was less than $13 for 36" and it fit nearly perfectly into the area I wanted to use it. But then the place that I wanted to put it was forward of where the single thick differential bracket extended. When I noticed that the 1" forward helped with that and also put another piece of 1/4" x 1.5" material on the other end of the tie point, the design seemed to be a (pardon me) no-brainer.

I probably would have continued to 'white-knuckle' it rather than spend $550 for the 'designed' version of the trac bar, so this is a pretty good deal if it works. I am seriously thinking of making the DIY front stabilizer, too.

To get the bolts out, I used a 1/2" x 18" breaker bar and an 18 mm deep well 6-point socket. I tried to take them off with my torque wrench, but it was too much for it - at 150 ft-lb, they still weren't coming loose, so I used the breaker bar. But that is mostly because of the Loctite they used. I have both a 1/2 and 3/4 air wrench, but I didn't want to use them on the differential - I can't tell if anything is going wrong and it happens too fast. If I couldn't get the bolts loose by hand, I wouldn't tackle the job.

The new bolts were larger and I needed a 22 mm deep well 6-point to fit them. I used that same 150 ft-lb torque wrench to tighten them to 125 ft-lb per the specs on the Blue Ox installation instructions, I believe it was. If you use Loctite, you have to get the thing to the right torque value soon. Any loosening or tightening that you do after it has set upsets the Loctite

I did not use a torque wrench on any of the other bolts, nor did I use Loctite. I don't like the stuff. But I have no intention of debating that with anyone. I just used lock washers and tightened them until they were as tight as the appropriate wrench would tighten them. Like I said, I have had lots of experience with heavy duty stuff like this and have learned what works and what doesn't.

I would much rather bend and weld steel than to build bird houses or some such - no, there is nothing wrong with building some suches out of wood, but that ain't what I like to do. This thing was a project - if it doesn't work out - ok, but if it does, better yet plus I had an enjoyable time spending 6 hrs over 3 days doing something I like to do.

Drilling the holes was the most difficult, bending the 1/4" plate material was second. But I had the equipment to do it (though not the best - a big bench vise, a heavy welding table and a cutting torch which I also used to heat the metal for bending). For drilling I used a drill press, but on the motorhome, I used an 18 vdc lithium drill motor (I really like that thing). I checked ahead of time that I could get it into the areas that I needed to get at and that part went fine.

I also removed only two of the bolts at a time. I was able to loctite and torque the rearmost differential bracket and used it to make the front bracket. As you can see, there is still some room for twisting, but I think the design is better than single plate because it is so simple and it supports both ends of the link pin bolts so I could use smaller bolts (still grade 8). The single plates work too, but should be made with heavier material (or stronger material) than is needed for this design. I don't think the torque on the differential should be an issue - if it is, they had better redesign the differential. LOL. Two bolts should be plenty, but not for my design. 1/4 x 1.5" is not hefty enough. And also notice how heavy I built the frame bracket. Most of the frame brackets I looked at would not be heavy enough made out of 1/4" x 1.5" stock.

If you have the money and are not inclined toward crawling under the big rig, don't - it becomes work and a real pain. (I suffer from neuro - something or other and can hardly walk or sleep through the night. Plus my short term memory is so bad that I have to go back and double check everything several times even though I have written it down.)

PS I made 8' long protectors for lying on the gravel under my rig. I cut up an old 4' high container for a bladder-type above ground pool that someone wanted to get rid of into 8' strips. That heavy-duty plastic takes the pain out of lying or kneeling on the gravel. I wish I could get one into the rig to take along. While traveling, I have an old rug that I can use in a pinch - so far the 'pinch' has not happened.
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