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Old 04-03-2019, 09:21 AM   #1
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2000 F53 - Changing Spark Plugs

Hey Guys:

I am going to be changing the spark plugs on a 2000 F53 chassis. It looks like everything is original. The coach has about 61,000 miles on it, so doing the change more as a preventative maintenance rather than a "it needs to be done". I pulled back the dog house cover last night to see what I will be getting myself into and see that all of the coils are pretty easy to get to, but there seems to be a metal rod going down each side that may interfere with getting the coils out. Just wanting to get everyone's experience on changing the plugs out and if there are any gotchas. Pictures attached.
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Old 04-03-2019, 09:25 AM   #2
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Danger Will Robinson. Lots of spark plug removal horror stories. The scariest are the plugs breaking off inside the cylinder head that require that the engine be pulled to fix the issue.

Doing it "just because" might turn into a MAJOR have to fix problem.

Breaking plugs in the head is not such a huge problem to fix in a pickup truck.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...kplugs-272227/

There is LOTs of info on the internet about this process. Just Google "changing spark plugs on Ford V-10"
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Old 04-03-2019, 09:29 AM   #3
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I think my model year chassis doesn't have the two piece spark plug. From the threads I have looked at, I will blast all of the holes with PBBlaster and let it sit for the retired time and not force the plugs out. At the very least, I would want to look at the boots and see if there is any cracking or deterioration on them.
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Old 04-03-2019, 09:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creativepart View Post
Danger Will Robinson. Lots of spark plug removal horror stories. The scariest are the plugs breaking off inside the cylinder head that require that the engine be pulled to fix the issue.

Doing it "just because" might turn into a MAJOR have to fix problem.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...kplugs-272227/
those plugs will last 100,000 mi if you insist put penetrating oil on plugs let set then use only ford plugs be careful on plug torque (very important)
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Old 04-03-2019, 09:32 AM   #5
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No issues with breaking plugs on that year V10. It's stripping the two or three threads when installing new plugs .
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Old 04-03-2019, 09:41 AM   #6
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I have read all of the horror stories and know to hand tighten them first so that they don't cross thread, not force them out and tighten down to 14-16 ft-lbs. From what I understand, the boots have a curve to them so it might be a little easier to get the coils and boots out, but that steel rod still has me perplexed a little. I might try to get one plug out and if it is causing issues, then I'll just look at the boots and change them if need be.
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Old 04-03-2019, 09:49 AM   #7
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That metal rod is your fuel rail. It feeds the fuel injectors. Clearance shouldn't be a problem.. You should have the single piece plug.

Here are my thoughts on changing the plugs::


before you start, use a blow gun and clean as much crap off the top as you can..


1) Mark a cylinder number on each of the COPS so you know where they came from.

2) Remove the COPS.

3) Use a vacuum cleaner with a small hose and reach down in the spark plug holes and get as much stuff out as you can (small rocks, gravels, etc)

4) Use a blow gun and blow out each hole.

5) Use a long skinny screwdriver or pick, reach down into each hole and move around the plug. You can fell when the pick is between the plug and the hole wall. DON'T PRY - The goal is to go around the plug to loosen any debris that may be trapped, then suck it out with the vacuum.

6) Repeat 3, 4, and 5 until there is no debris in the hole

7) Squirt a few shots of PB blaster down into each hole. go eat lunch.

8) Use a long socket, knock the plug lose, i.e. maybe 1/8 of a turn, then snug it back up. Loosen a little more, 1/4 turn, then snug back up, Do this a couple times, moving the plug out more with each re-snugging. The goal here is to break up any ridge that forms on the end of the plug that could damage the threads as you remove the plug.


Make a note of any plugs that seemed to come out very easy, like they weren't very tight.


9) I kept track of which hole the plug came out of, i.e. a large piece of styrofoam with the cyl numbers on it. Then push the plug upside down into the foam.

10) Use the vacuum cleaner to clean out any debris that may be in the holes.. At this time the holes should be clean. If you want, carefully take a thin rag wrapped around the skinny screwdriver and wipe down inside the hole.

11) Inspect each plug carefully, looking specifically at the threads for any signs that the plug may have seized in the hole. Also look for any spark tracking up the insulator.

12) New plugs - Use a nickle plated plug, the color will be a silver color, not black. I used Autolite APP103. (Check for rebate) These are a high quality double platinum plug.

13) Use a very small amount of anti-seize on the threads. Don't glob it on, a very thin coat on the threads only.

14) Install the plugs snugly. Torque each plug to 23 ft lbs. NOTE The factory torque calls for 160 inch lbs. (approx 14 ft lbs) Its generally accepted in the maintenance community that 14 is not enough and may be contributing to the spitting plug issue. 23 seems to be that accepted torque.

15) I'd recommend new COPs (I use inexpensive ones, $50 for all 10) However, at minimum, consider installing new rubbers, OR, inspect the old rubbers carefully for arcing.

Use a cotton swab and wipe a very thin layer (just a tiny bit) of silicon paste (Dielectric grease) up inside the first 1/4 inch of the boot.

16) I think the torque on the COP bolt is 120 inch lbs

Buy an inexpensive 1/4 and 3/8 drive torque wrench to use for plugs. When you store them, make sure to loosen the torque adjust bolt as lose as it will go.
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Old 04-03-2019, 01:48 PM   #8
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What COPs would you suggest? I was looking at RockAuto and found some for $7-$10 a pop. Are those any good or should I try to get the Denso if possible?
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Old 04-03-2019, 04:35 PM   #9
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These are the ones I installed after reassembling from broken exhaust studs:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/10Pack-RED-...53.m2749.l2649

..
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Old 04-03-2019, 05:18 PM   #10
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Post #7 had some good directions. Here are a few edits to consider.


Step 8. Loosen the plugs 1/8 turn and then go to lunch or even come back in the morning. If not loosened, the PB Blaster cannot reach the thread.



More Step 8. Use a ratcheting torque wrench to remove the plugs. Set the wrench to 15 ft lbs. If a plug after being loosened is more than 15 ft lbs tight, there is a risk that the threads will strip or the plug breaks. If tighter than 15 ft lbs, screw plug back in 1/4 turn and add more PB Blaster and wait. Try again.


Many have done successful plug changes without issue with a little patience and a stone cold engine.


Regarding whether to perform the maintenance or not. Change them now with 60000 miles of carbon buildup or change them later with 100000 miles of carbon buildup. There might even be a little perfomance improvement.
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Old 04-04-2019, 01:22 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiba_Alex View Post
I have read all of the horror stories and know to hand tighten them first so that they don't cross thread, not force them out and tighten down to 14-16 ft-lbs. From what I understand, the boots have a curve to them so it might be a little easier to get the coils and boots out, but that steel rod still has me perplexed a little. I might try to get one plug out and if it is causing issues, then I'll just look at the boots and change them if need be.
The steel rod (fuel rail) is a non issue, just work around it.
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Old 04-04-2019, 04:37 PM   #12
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Just in case someone stumbles on this and reads the 2-piece plug horror stories, my 2006 is in that year. I changed mine last year and not a single one broke. Took my time, presoaked, 2 tanks of seafoam.
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Old 04-05-2019, 07:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waiter21 View Post
That metal rod is your fuel rail. It feeds the fuel injectors. Clearance shouldn't be a problem.. You should have the single piece plug.

Here are my thoughts on changing the plugs::


before you start, use a blow gun and clean as much crap off the top as you can..


1) Mark a cylinder number on each of the COPS so you know where they came from.

2) Remove the COPS.

3) Use a vacuum cleaner with a small hose and reach down in the spark plug holes and get as much stuff out as you can (small rocks, gravels, etc)

4) Use a blow gun and blow out each hole.

5) Use a long skinny screwdriver or pick, reach down into each hole and move around the plug. You can fell when the pick is between the plug and the hole wall. DON'T PRY - The goal is to go around the plug to loosen any debris that may be trapped, then suck it out with the vacuum.

6) Repeat 3, 4, and 5 until there is no debris in the hole

7) Squirt a few shots of PB blaster down into each hole. go eat lunch.

8) Use a long socket, knock the plug lose, i.e. maybe 1/8 of a turn, then snug it back up. Loosen a little more, 1/4 turn, then snug back up, Do this a couple times, moving the plug out more with each re-snugging. The goal here is to break up any ridge that forms on the end of the plug that could damage the threads as you remove the plug.


Make a note of any plugs that seemed to come out very easy, like they weren't very tight.


9) I kept track of which hole the plug came out of, i.e. a large piece of styrofoam with the cyl numbers on it. Then push the plug upside down into the foam.

10) Use the vacuum cleaner to clean out any debris that may be in the holes.. At this time the holes should be clean. If you want, carefully take a thin rag wrapped around the skinny screwdriver and wipe down inside the hole.

11) Inspect each plug carefully, looking specifically at the threads for any signs that the plug may have seized in the hole. Also look for any spark tracking up the insulator.

12) New plugs - Use a nickle plated plug, the color will be a silver color, not black. I used Autolite APP103. (Check for rebate) These are a high quality double platinum plug.

13) Use a very small amount of anti-seize on the threads. Don't glob it on, a very thin coat on the threads only.

14) Install the plugs snugly. Torque each plug to 23 ft lbs. NOTE The factory torque calls for 160 inch lbs. (approx 14 ft lbs) Its generally accepted in the maintenance community that 14 is not enough and may be contributing to the spitting plug issue. 23 seems to be that accepted torque.

15) I'd recommend new COPs (I use inexpensive ones, $50 for all 10) However, at minimum, consider installing new rubbers, OR, inspect the old rubbers carefully for arcing.

Use a cotton swab and wipe a very thin layer (just a tiny bit) of silicon paste (Dielectric grease) up inside the first 1/4 inch of the boot.

16) I think the torque on the COP bolt is 120 inch lbs

Buy an inexpensive 1/4 and 3/8 drive torque wrench to use for plugs. When you store them, make sure to loosen the torque adjust bolt as lose as it will go.
The above is very good advice, and is very similar to how I changed the plugs on our 2001 Tiffin. We purchased ours in the Aug 2016, with approx. 47k on the odometer, and changed the plugs shortly after purchase.

I used Kroil as the penetrating oil, and like the above advice, used a very small amount of anti-seize, and torqued to 23 ft lbs.

While pulling the COPS, two boots came out with rust and grime on them, with a very faint antifreeze smell. Apparently the coolant hose over this area had been replaced due to a leak. What the previous owner didn't know was that antifreeze worked its way past the boots, then was trapped in the plug opening. The plug hex rusted on these two plugs. I spent hours cleaning out these two openings.

It took two cans of WD40, a pint of Kroil, numerous blue shop towels, and a bag of cleaning patches. First I had to dry out the opening. The liquid was like a slushy. After the initial wet gunk was removed, then I started spraying liberal amounts of WD40 into the hole, swab it out, and repeat. Started using Kroil to soak then swab after I had emptied two cans of WD40. Tools used were very long/thin screwdriver, long thin needle nose pliers, slotted cleaning rod, pronged pickup tool, and high pressure blow gun with long nozzle (be sure to wear goggles or side shields when using high pressure air to blow our these holes). Once clean, I squirted enough Kroil into both openings that is was above the spark plug hex. Let it sit overnight.

Next morning, cleaned out the Kroil, and noticed some very minor gunk on the patches. After manually drying the openings with patches, I used high pressure air to blow out any debris. Squirted more Kroil into the openings, let it sit for an hour, then removed the Kroil with patches. Didn't see any gunk on patches, so I finally tried to remove the plugs. Felt a little more resistance on these two plugs than I had felt on the other eight plugs the previous day. Plugs had been turned maybe 1/8th of a turn. Blew the openings out with high pressure air, squirted more Kroil into openings, removed as much Kroil as I could with patches, blew out openings and swapped again. Squirted more Kroil into opening, waited another hour, turned the plug clockwise, then tried to back them out again. They were easier than previous days plugs, but I worked them back and forth every 1/8th to 1/4 turn. Blew & swabbed out openings again before I fully extracted the plugs.

I did replace all 10 boots.

Hopefully nobody else goes through what I did.
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Old 04-06-2019, 08:26 PM   #14
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My experience on a 2002: Changed my spark plugs today
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