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Old 09-30-2015, 09:52 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
FWIW I am not sure it matters. Assuming there is no sub panel in the path the place the neutral and ground are connected together is the main panel box. If he is pulling 4 wires that are the same color and the hot's are correct either of the other wires can go to ground and the other go to neutral as they will be the same at the panel.

I would check the hots are at the right place before I plugged in! Nothing personal but too many years of proving Murphy was an optimist. ;-)

FWIW2 I would not expect a home installation to be wired like a park installation. Looking at the way parks are wired they should have a ground rod at the pedestal and connect neutral and ground there. For a home installation I would expect a relatively short run without the extra ground rod to avoid ground looping.

Older homes like mine did not require ground, just neutral and the 2 hot (120v) lines. I ran the 3 lines to a pedestal box mounted to the side of the house. The box comes equipped to pair/join neutral and ground. I ran #6 bare wire from the box to a 8 foot grounding rod. The panel box in the coach looks for the pairing of ground and neutral. Did the install about 2 years ago and I think having 50 Amp year round for the coach is one of the best things I did.
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Old 10-01-2015, 04:02 AM   #16
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I had a licensed electrician do mine and i love the convenience. I also put a dump port the driveway. Heaven!
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Old 10-01-2015, 05:29 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by HVAC Bill View Post
As said in previous reply, electrically and code wise, as long as last 4-6" is marked with the proper color tape all is good. One very important feature that I have not heard mentioned is this plug is considered for outdoor use, therefore make sure your breaker is a ground fault breaker. Expensive, but many are killed with a lot less amperes.
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Good advice but be prepared for someone to use the wrong ground fault interupter breaker. the typical GFI breaker for a hot tub if I remember correctly was 55 or 60 amps. To give you an idea. Home depot sells a nice gfi outdoor panel that is 60 amps for 72.95 they sell a 50 amp gfi breaker for 172.00 I ran into this when i put in my steam shower it needed a 30 amp breaker and that was 130.00 compared to the 55 amp gfi breakers at lowes which was 60 dollars. I figure that popularity of Hot tubs brings up the demand and lowers the price for that size of GFI breaker. A cheap electrician could possibly decided it is not that much difference and put in the cheaper breaker in order to increase his profit if he is on a bid job. Check the breaker size before they leave the job.


I worked in a steel mill where they bought 500 amg mg wiring in spools and then cut the wire in the lengths they needed. We just color coded the ends and it worked fine. to check it easily use the previous advice.
turn off the circuit breaker. go to the other end and ohm one of the hot cables to the neutral connection and to the ground connection. should show a short. go back to the panel box and disconnect the ground connection ( if it is on a seperate connector from the neutral) and then go back and ohm out from the hot to the ground and see if it is open. If it is not then see if the neutral is open. If the neutral is open call the electrician back out and have him redo it. If they are both on the same connector and it is not a sub panel then who cares it wont make a difference.
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Old 10-01-2015, 05:44 AM   #18
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I don't remember seeing any of the 50 amp breakers in the campgrounds that we have used being ground fault breakers.
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Old 10-01-2015, 07:43 AM   #19
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If the wires are the same color, and the same size, then it does not matter since both Ground and Neutral connect to the same bus or to interconnected busses at the main service panel.

If they are DIFFERENT sizes, then that's your answer. The smaller one should be ground.
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Old 10-01-2015, 08:07 AM   #20
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Folks jumping on the color band wagon should be aware that color coding is mostly for premade cable. Wire in a conduit is often all black with markers.

BTW, a good way to get wire is to buy 4 different colored 250 ft spools for somebody who is worried then use 50 to make the run. Of course the end user gets billed by the spool while the electrician disposes of the leftovers. ;-)
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Old 10-01-2015, 08:28 AM   #21
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Regardless if the neutral and ground are swapped will make no consequence to your trailer function. If the neutral and ground aren't bonded together in the breaker box, then they will be at the meter. The only difference in a neutral and a ground is that the neutral carries the return current back to the meter/panel/etc for 120 circuits and the difference in current between the two hot legs in the 240 circuits. The only reason you would want the neutral (other than the CODE!) is the fact that you don't want to be returning current on a bare, uninsulated wire (thus they changed the code years ago to replace the 3 prong dryer plugs with the new 4 prong ones).

Look behind the plug in the box. If the bare wire is on the rounded/ground socket, then you are good. If both neutral and ground wires are both insulated, then it doesn't matter. The 50amp RV plug is the same as a standard 240 VAC welder plug, only the difference is how the RV connects to it. It uses each hot leg as a separate 120 VAC connection. So, if you pull 50 amps from a 240 VAC plug with a 240 VAC load, the neutral should carry 0 amps (theoretically.) On an RV, it will be the same as long as he wired it to a double pole breaker...insuring each hot leg is on a separate phase in the panel. If he used two singles and they end up on the same phase, the neutral will carry 100A.

Enough babbling.....there you go. $.02
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Old 10-01-2015, 09:49 AM   #22
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Q. What are the Code rules for identifying circuit conductors?
A. The neutral conductor of a branch circuit must be identified in accordance with 200.6 [210.5(A)]. Equipment grounding conductors can be bare, covered, or insulated. Insulated equipment grounding conductors size 6 AWG and smaller must have a continuous outer finish either green or green with one or more yellow stripes, in conformance with 250.119 [210.5(B)]. On equipment grounding conductors 4 AWG and larger, insulation can be permanently reidentified with green marking at the time of installation at every point where the conductor is accessible [250.119(A)]. Ungrounded conductors must be identified as follows [210.5(C)]:
• If the premises wiring system contains branch circuits supplied from more than one voltage system, then each ungrounded conductor must be identified by phase and system at all termination, connection, and splice points.
• Identification can be by color coding, marking tape, tagging, or other means approved by the AHJ.
• The method of identification must be documented in a manner that’s readily available or permanently posted at each branch circuit panelboard.
Here are some additional points to keep in mind:


When a premises has more than one voltage system supplying branch circuits, the ungrounded conductors must be identified by phase and system. This can be done by permanently posting an identification legend that describes the method used, such as color-coded marking tape or color-coded insulation.
• Conductors with insulation that’s green or green with one or more yellow stripes can’t be used for an ungrounded or neutral conductor [250.119].
Although the NEC doesn’t require a specific color code for ungrounded conductors, electricians often use the following color system for power and lighting conductor identification:
120/240V, single-phase — black, red, and white
120/208V, 3-phase — black, red, blue, and white
120/240V, 3-phase — black, orange, blue, and white
277/480V, 3-phase — brown, orange, yellow, and gray; or, brown, purple, yellow, and gray






GFCI is not required for this installation. Outdoor outlets of 15 or 20 amp 120 volt do require GFCI protection.
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Old 10-01-2015, 09:53 AM   #23
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I'm having a service installed at home and was wondering if there is a way to verify the ground and neutral aren't swapped at the box if all the wire is the same color.
If you can disconnect the neutral wire from the plug, you can then read the ground pin to the breaker box frame for continuity with an ohmmeter.
This should eliminate any confusion of which is which, regardless of color coding.
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Old 10-01-2015, 10:08 AM   #24
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Something I tell everyone....neutral is always white, but a white is not always a neutral. That applies to insulation color or phase taped conductors. [/derail]
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Old 10-01-2015, 05:42 PM   #25
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If you ave a circuit surge protector, most of them have indicators showing if wiring is correct. Best of luck.
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:47 AM   #26
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I'd be highly suspicious of any work done by an "electrician" who didn't use properly color coded wires. Plain and simple - an installation that isn't color coded fails to meet not only the letter of the code - but more importantly, the intent of the code. I'd keep my checkbook in my pocket until the job was done right.
Good advice, Space!!
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:49 AM   #27
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I'm having a service installed at home and was wondering if there is a way to verify the ground and neutral aren't swapped at the box if all the wire is the same color.
I'm curious why you are asking this??
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Old 10-02-2015, 08:12 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by HVAC Bill View Post
As said in previous reply, electrically and code wise, as long as last 4-6" is marked with the proper color tape all is good. One very important feature that I have not heard mentioned is this plug is considered for outdoor use, therefore make sure your breaker is a ground fault breaker. Expensive, but many are killed with a lot less amperes.
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Many RVs with large inverters will not work with a GFI breaker. Ours won't. I really don't know why, but it's pretty common.

I don't think I've ever seen a GFI breaker in an RV Park. At least for the 50amp and 30amp plugs. The 15/20 plug is almost always GFI.
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