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Old 06-06-2018, 06:44 PM   #1
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A/C Issues Still

Well, after an exhaustive search for a new condenser I was told a little over $1000.00 plus tax by a wholesaler. It would seem that my condenser also has the engine oil cooler made into it which drives up the price. If anyone on the forum has genuine expertise in automotive A/C, I pose this question. If I separate the two components and purchase them separately would this work. Keeping in mind that the condenser I can get is about $220.00 before shipping and is 5/8th thick where the OEM is about 2" thick. I have been told that the system would require the thick one and probably would not cool very well with the thinner replacement.

On another note if I change my 14 year old rooftop unit rated at 14800 BTU, am I going to experience any significant difference with a new 15000 BTU unit?
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Old 06-06-2018, 07:36 PM   #2
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I have never heard of an oil cooler built into a condenser. Not doubting you, but, pressurized gas needing to cool rapidly and hot engine oil are usually not put together in a unit, even if seperated physically.

What year/make model is this on?

Roof ac difference will not be noticable unless the old unit is simply not cooling anymore. Newer units are more efficient.
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Old 06-06-2018, 07:44 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Houdoxi71 View Post
I have never heard of an oil cooler built into a condenser. Not doubting you, but, pressurized gas needing to cool rapidly and hot engine oil are usually not put together in a unit, even if seperated physically.

What year/make model is this on?

Roof ac difference will not be noticable unless the old unit is simply not cooling anymore. Newer units are more efficient.
Well, Workhorse used them in all there W series chassis

My W22 has engine oil, trans oil, and A/C condenser

Cooling Pack for Workhorse Motorhome Chassis W20, W22, W24, P32 replaces W8001442 Made In USA - American Cooling Solutions


OP if we new what type of chassis you had we could help you even more, the link will probably have what you need, but you might not like the price.

I would advise not putting another A/C condenser on the front, as it might block the flow to your more important cooling components.


Also, here is a Workhorse engine oil/A/C condenser cooler.

http://www.americancoolingsolutions....rhome-chassis/
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Old 06-06-2018, 09:22 PM   #4
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Well, Workhorse used them in all there W series chassis

My W22 has engine oil, trans oil, and A/C condenser

Also, here is a Workhorse engine oil/A/C condenser cooler.

Cooling Pack W8002833 for Workhorse Motorhome Chassis - American Cooling Solutions
Aaaaaand now I know!

I can see why, but it's not a great idea. Seeing as how there is that much involved in one unit, however, the ones you posted seem like bargain basement pricing TBH...

It's a $1,000 hit either way, sucks..
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Old 06-07-2018, 06:43 AM   #5
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That's a really stupid setup. What were those engineers thinking?!
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Old 06-07-2018, 06:43 PM   #6
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My RV

Sorry I didn't list the make/model. 2004 Winnebago Sightseer 28'
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Old 06-07-2018, 07:44 PM   #7
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Sorry I didn't list the make/model. 2004 Winnebago Sightseer 28'
It would be helpful if you tell us the CHASSIS make and model.
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Old 06-07-2018, 07:44 PM   #8
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For your rooftop unit , you will not notice any difference between the 14800 and 15000 BTU units . It is only 200 BTU.

As for your condenser , my P30 has a similar unit with the oil cooler in the lower part of the condenser. A smaller thinner automotive condenser will not be able to remove enough heat to allow the A/C unit to properly cool your coach. If you can get the proper sized condenser and oil cooler , there should be no reason that they can't be separated. A large van or small bus might have a condenser closer to the proper size. Bigger will work better if you got the room to mount it.
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Old 06-07-2018, 10:11 PM   #9
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You might notice a significant difference. (1) new units are more energy efficient; (2) a 14 year old unit probably has a compressor that is not nearly as efficient as it was on day one, where a new unit will have a brand new compressor + valves, etc. The new unit ought to cool as well (if not better) than your current unit did when it was new, 14 years ago.
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Old 06-08-2018, 06:01 AM   #10
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I wouldn't be in a big hurry to replace a rooftop R134 refrigerant unit with a new R410 refrigerant unit.

My Monaco came with two R134 units and one R410 unit. I see no difference in amp draw between them. The R410 units operate at much higher head pressures and are going to fail sooner, IMHO. At room temperature R410a has a pressure of nearly 200 psi, while R134a is around 70 psi.
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Old 06-08-2018, 09:48 AM   #11
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I wouldn't be in a big hurry to replace a rooftop R134 refrigerant unit with a new R410 refrigerant unit.

My Monaco came with two R134 units and one R410 unit. I see no difference in amp draw between them. The R410 units operate at much higher head pressures and are going to fail sooner, IMHO. At room temperature R410a has a pressure of nearly 200 psi, while R134a is around 70 psi.
Would not disagree with the refrigerant side of that. Same deal with R12 to R134a. R12 is a MUCH better refrigerant for automobile AC systems. That being said, why would anyone convert from R134a to R410? Both are on the EPA's "attaboy list". My house still uses R22 and I have no intention of changing that. I have about 30 pounds of R22 tucked away in my basement.

I would not expect any improvement going from a R134a system to a R410 system. But I would expect improvement when replacing a 14+ year old A/C system. There are always improvements. IE things like rifled evap core tubing, better compressor valving, elimination of copper in the evap side to avoid the leaks caused by the formation of formic acid, etc. SEERs have crept up significantly over the last 15 years.
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