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Old 12-22-2013, 08:13 AM   #15
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Very happy with TST, work very well and excellent customer service. I like that I can replace the batteries when needed.
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Old 12-22-2013, 08:14 AM   #16
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My toad already has internal pressure valves so I guess I would need to add external ones.

Interesting on the batteries, to send 10 back @$25 each

Who makes them with replaceable batteries?
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Old 12-22-2013, 08:26 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by jimbo2013 View Post
My toad already has internal pressure valves so I guess I would need to add external ones.

Interesting on the batteries, to send 10 back @$25 each

Who makes them with replaceable batteries?
TST does, but others probably do also.
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Old 12-22-2013, 10:15 AM   #18
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When I was getting my TPMS I found that most of them would provide the function adequately for monitoring the tires. The reason I went with TST was the response to customer problems. I donít know of many of the TPMS owners would give you a call on a Saturday morning to assist with a problem with their system. Dan Covington the owner did this when I was having a problem with one of the monitors. Also this past week I had a monitor that I had broken the stem for the air gauge on one of the tires, I called TST and they informed me that they would get one out right away, all I had to do was return the one that was broken. Not that is what I call good customer service.
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Old 12-22-2013, 12:49 PM   #19
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Buy a good tire guage. Check tires visually daily / thump the duels to make sure there is not an undetected flat. Put the gauge on them weekly.

Save your money of monitoring systems. I personally think they are a pain and a waste. You don't find passenger busses or big rigs with them. IMO they are not needed.

I don't have any of my company trucks equipped with them and run hundreds of thousands of miles a year with no issues. I have never personally had a situation I felt a TPMS would be useful for.
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Old 12-22-2013, 01:17 PM   #20
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Buy a good tire guage. Check tires visually daily / thump the duels to make sure there is not an undetected flat. Put the gauge on them weekly. Save your money of monitoring systems. I personally think they are a pain and a waste. You don't find passenger busses or big rigs with them. IMO they are not needed. I don't have any of my company trucks equipped with them and run hundreds of thousands of miles a year with no issues. I have never personally had a situation I felt a TPMS would be useful for.
We all have to decide what tools make sense for us. Certainly checking psi cold each travel morning should be thought of as necessary. I, however, have never been able to tell a 10/15/20 psi difference by thumping. What is a "pain" about having a properly operating TPMS. I do understand that they are somewhat expensive.

I have used a TPMS for about ten years now and I'm comfortable with the accuracy of the monitors. On a travel morning I step through the tire positions on the monitor and look at the cold pressures.

The big thing you get with a TPMS is protection it the case of an over the road lost of pressure from what ever cause. I had this happen on an inside dual. The puncture happened early on a travel day. Without the TPMS warning I would have run flat for some time and perhaps blown out the outside duel from being grossly over weight. On a motorhome, a lot of couch damage can be caused by a blowout and anything I can do to prevent one is high on my list.

I made my decision on TPMS ten years and about 75k miles ago and I would not want to travel without it.
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Old 12-22-2013, 01:29 PM   #21
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Buy a good tire guage. Check tires visually daily / thump the duels to make sure there is not an undetected flat. Put the gauge on them weekly.

Save your money of monitoring systems. I personally think they are a pain and a waste. You don't find passenger busses or big rigs with them. IMO they are not needed.

I don't have any of my company trucks equipped with them and run hundreds of thousands of miles a year with no issues. I have never personally had a situation I felt a TPMS would be useful for.
Would traveling 100-300 miles with a flat inside dual tire cause you any concern or subsequent damage to the overloaded outside dual?

It would me!

I had a rear tandem tire go flat on my 30 foot trailer. It just so happen to be the same tire that had am intermittent sensor so I wasn't aware of the problem until some very nice Canadian stopped me to tell me. I had to replace two tires as a result. The rear one was shredded and the front one had been stressed to the point that it sounded like popcorn when re-inflating it.

I have since replaced the entire Doran RV360 TPMS with one that I can trust and is reliable. Dumped the Doran TPMS one on eBay and bought a Tire SafeGuard TPMS.

You can do as you please but for every person who thinks it's waste of money there are 100 that think otherwise.

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Old 12-22-2013, 01:40 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutAround View Post
Buy a good tire guage. Check tires visually daily / thump the duels to make sure there is not an undetected flat. Put the gauge on them weekly.

Save your money of monitoring systems. I personally think they are a pain and a waste. You don't find passenger busses or big rigs with them. IMO they are not needed.

I don't have any of my company trucks equipped with them and run hundreds of thousands of miles a year with no issues. I have never personally had a situation I felt a TPMS would be useful for.
I agree, you should check daily. If I only had the RV I would not worry about a monitor. When you tump a tire you are not interested in the bounce but the sound it makes. Only true way to check pressure is with a gauge.

The only reason I want a monitor is for the trailer I pull. Yu cannot see the tires, and you cannot feel if there is a problem while driving down the road. I look at it as insurance.
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Old 12-22-2013, 01:55 PM   #23
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We all have to decide what tools make sense for us. Certainly checking psi cold each travel morning should be thought of as necessary. I, however, have never been able to tell a 10/15/20 psi difference by thumping. What is a "pain" about having a properly operating TPMS. I do understand that they are somewhat expensive. I have used a TPMS for about ten years now and I'm comfortable with the accuracy of the monitors. On a travel morning I step through the tire positions on the monitor and look at the cold pressures. The big thing you get with a TPMS is protection it the case of an over the road lost of pressure from what ever cause. I had this happen on an inside dual. The puncture happened early on a travel day. Without the TPMS warning I would have run flat for some time and perhaps blown out the outside duel from being grossly over weight. On a motorhome, a lot of couch damage can be caused by a blowout and anything I can do to prevent one is high on my list. I made my decision on TPMS ten years and about 75k miles ago and I would not want to travel without it.
The purpose of thumping is just to see if the inside or outside duel is inflated or not. It is not to gauge with any accuracy the exact tire pressure. Agreed you can't tell 10-20lbs difference. When a trucker tells me they can hear the difference in 10lbs at a truck stop with 100 rigs running I am quick to say...hey let's put a hundred bucks on it....Ive yet to have anyone take me up on the offer. Same with the drivers my company employs.

10 and many times 20 lbs isn't going to make a difference or shouldn't make a difference on big rig tires unless they are being run at the exact capacity and psi required for the weight. Hopefully, RV owners and truckers have some contingency built into whatever PSI they decide to run based on weight.

However, you can tell a difference in 50 or more pounds and you can definitely tell the difference between full and flat.

I put a gauge on my tires once a weekish. I do a visual inspection at every fuel stop and every morning before departure with a flash light. You would notice during a visual inspection a substantially low front tire. However an inside or outside duel may look perfectly normal and be completely flat. A thump lets you know this.

IMO the most important things regarding the tires cannot be determined from a TPMS. Its a fact with more automation and monitoring people pay less attention. Accidents rates went up with the introduction of ABS brakes because people felt the technology would enable them to drive faster in bad conditions. The most recent example has got to be the Asiana Boeing 777 crash in San Francisco. (Coincidentally I was at the airport that day to fly out for a business metering and watched the plane crash).

In this case all (5) of the pilots on board that day were clueless how to land the plane in absolutely perfect VFR conditions because they has so over relied on automation.

Back to tires.....


There is no TPMs that can look at the condition of the tread. I look for any chunks of tread mission, cuts, deep scrapes, sidewall damage or cracking and I feel the top and outsides of the tires...with gloves on gotta protect my hands lol......and I feel for any lumps, bumps and bulges. I visually look for any foreign objects that may have punctured the tire. Very often a tire can have a nail or spike imbedded in the tire but not be leaking. When that tread gets hot from friction and if the belts have been pierced with the object still embedded a nasty separation can occur often without any warning even from a TPMS.

A tire an be perfectly inflated but be tremendously unsafe to drive on.

I've hinted I own a company that is in the RV industry and I have taught.....well over 1,000 people hands on.....how to drive, operate and maintain their coach. I am often asked my option of TPMS and I universally have been against them.

My biggest concern is over reliance on a TPMS and someone not doing a full walk around / inspection before departure and at fuel stops.

This doesn't mean I'm any more right or wrong than anyone else. Just my humble opinion.

I always suggest buying good quality tires. If the coach has Goodyears trash them...use the TPMS money to do so if needed. Lol. I'm not a fan of buying Doublecoins and Hankooks and all of those other brands I can't pronounce. Again....my opinion.

I always have a chuckle when someone spends a ton of money to buy a coach or TT then wants to put cheap tires on it.....to each their own. My uncle would buy an 80-100k car and put the cheapest no name tires on it.....really didn't understand it.

As far as a TPMS being a pain, when I still owned my dealership my service department installed a couple of different brands of TPMS systems. I can't even remember the brand now...but they were horrible to get to sync up and the longer coaches had difficulty without adding a signal booster. Also, if we got them working they usually failed after a brief period of time.

Granted this was in the earlier days of TPMS so perhaps the technology has improved.

I also am a believer in less is more specifically with buttons and gauges to distract a driver when driving. TPMS just adds another item for someone to get focused on and have tunnel vision trying to cycle through or interpret a warning. I am not a fan of half of the gauges and buttons manufactures put on the coaches or cars in general. IMO the turbo boost psi is useless as well as some of the other gauges. Does a person really need a button to toggle from a car horn to air horn? Same with the dash radio on / off. Here's an idea just wire it up to always be on and if you want it off use the on/ off button from the head unit.

Anyway....just me.

I'm sure antidotally there are people who have success stories with a TPMS avoiding a problem....like the one you shared. In my experience with an extreme amount if miles driven in RVs and by my company trucks / coaches......I do not believe it is a worthwhile expense.

Just my opinion.
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Old 12-22-2013, 01:57 PM   #24
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So you check all of your tires and they are good. Pull out and pick up a nail on the Toad. How long before you know you are destroying a tire and rim? I was lucky, made a quick stop for the wife to go in the gift shop and I did another walk around and found a flat tire on the Toad that I had just checked 15 minutes earlier.

Tire-SafeGuard for me.
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Old 12-22-2013, 02:05 PM   #25
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So you check all of your tires and they are good. Pull out and pick up a nail on the Toad. How long before you know you are destroying a tire and rim? I was lucky, made a quick stop for the wife to go in the gift shop and I did another walk around and found a flat tire on the Toad that I had just checked 15 minutes earlier. Tire-SafeGuard for me.
Granted it could happen. However, I would notice the toad in the camera behaving erratically and feel any different vibrations in the coach. I know...folks say I can't do that but I can and I have done that. I have heard exhaust leaks from 40 feet away from the engine, bearings and differential problems also.

I personally and my company has pulled various roads for an extreme amount of miles. My current toad has been pulled further than it has been driven.

Your situation is possible. However, in all of my driving I have never had that happen. To me the cost / benefit just isn't there for me and my company. Obviously people have different thresholds and analysis of the same situations.

I don't think that makes either of us wrong. I just chimed in bc...well I'm bored...promised the wife I'd take 2 months off work and its killing me.......and because the OP is a newbie and some of the posts I've read have actually stated TPMS is a must have. Its not a must have universally.
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Old 12-22-2013, 04:43 PM   #26
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OutAround makes some valid points. TPM are just one tool used by me to monitor the tires. At each fuel stop, I check and feel the tires while the pump is running. I have pulled off the road for a campground and had the alarm go off. A tire on my trailer got a slash from something and was flat in a few seconds. I was done for the day, but it might have happened in the morning and without the TPM, it would have been a problem out on the interstate. Our MH has been parked for six weeks and we are getting ready to go to the Rose Bowl. Turned on the monitor and confirmed the tires are where they should be. It may not be of value to some, but I would rather have a TPMS for peace of mind.
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Old 12-22-2013, 05:00 PM   #27
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I ran for years w/o a TPMS. Then I had a flat on the toad as I pulled into an RV park and realized I would not have known until it had done a lot of damage. I bought a TST system and had tons of grief with it ...customer service was great, but sensors repeatedly failed and came loose causing flats while parked. I now run a TireTraker system and have had no problems at all. The sensors are smaller and lighter than any others (except two who sell the same system under different names) and have replaceable batteries. My 40' coach has a rear closet, which I blamed for my needing the booster with both the TST and the TireTraker system. Even with the TPMS, I do a walk-around at each stop and often use an infrared thermometer to check for unexpected high temps.
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Old 12-22-2013, 05:08 PM   #28
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I drove tractor trailer for several years when I was a young man. Yep, I was a tire thumper. Blew some tires too. Usually when one went on a dual it took the other. Had one retread come loose and having one end still attached to the casing came around and caved in the tail gate.

I rely on my TPMS from Truckers Supply. I just upgraded to the 507SG model, (anyone want to buy my old unit and sensors?), and with this one I can air up without removing and change batteries myself.

Now instead of going out in the cold and rain in the morning, I can sit in my captains chair with a cup of coffee and check each tire. Like that a lot. I have found the system to be pretty accurate as well.

What really blows tires is when they get low on air and the sidewalls start to flex. Ever take a piece of metal and start bending it until it breaks . It gets HOT! Well, tire walls flexing get hot too. The TPMS monitors the temp as well as pressure and that's what I want to know.

My family owned a pretty good sized trucking company. I sold the last Freightliner Tractor a few years back when my Brother passed away. Don't say trucking companies don't use them, most do. Operators are always glad for any technology that makes their life easier and more effective.
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