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Old 09-17-2015, 10:31 AM   #43
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I'm always amazed at the hysteria this question produces. And the misinformation.

The 220 (240) volt diagram is the correct one. The standard 50A RV outlet has 240v available. Just like your house power at home. Just because your RV has no actual 220v or 240v circuits does not mean the power outlet can't have 240v available for use. And some [few] RVs do in fact employ actual 220v circuits and appliances, e.g. an electric stove/oven or residential style clothes dryer.

I think Cooperhawk is thinking of a 30A RV plugged to an older style 30A/240v outlet that was commonly used for welders and old 3-pront-plug dryers. THAT is a no-no, but it has nothing to do with an RV designed for 50A power.
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Old 09-17-2015, 04:17 PM   #44
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I wire my own, (with inspections), and I am always worried that someone will get the wrong receptacle. Just trying to be cautious.
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Old 09-17-2015, 05:43 PM   #45
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The fundamental problem is that many 240vac welder and home dryer installations have used the standard TT-30R outlet. Therefore before plugging in, you should verify the voltage.

A RV 30amp service is 120vac

Reference: http://www.myrv.us/Imgs/PDF/30-amp%20Service.pdf



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Old 09-17-2015, 09:27 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shiggs68 View Post
Here is a link http://www.myrv.us/Imgs/PDF/50-amp%20Service.pdf

And a picture Attachment 107064

And a link to how a standard campground post is wired https://www.google.com/search?q=50am...2_ZHOwFR3mM%3A


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To answer the OP's question, are 50Amps 220 Volt? The answer is Yes it can be. If the appliance plugged into the receptacle connects L1 and L2 together, it uses the power as 220V. If the appliance (the RV) does not connect L1 and L2 together, but uses L1 and L2 as separate individual power circuits, then this appliance (the RV) uses the power as 110V.

50 Amp receptacles are the easiest and the safest to set up, with a L1 power line, a L2 power line, a neutral connection and a ground connection. The rest depends on the appliance being plugged into it.

As I stated previously, I have a 50 Amp receptacle set up in my shop. When I plug my coach into it, it uses it as a 110V power supply. When I plug my big shop air compressor or my welder into it, they use it as a 220V power supply.

30 Amp receptacles are a totally different story. They can be set up as 110V or 220V. I don't think the OP is asking about that.

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Old 09-18-2015, 07:08 AM   #47
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To answer the OP's question, are 50Amps 220 Volt? The answer is Yes it can be. If the appliance plugged into the receptacle connects L1 and L2 together, it uses the power as 220V. If the appliance (the RV) does not connect L1 and L2 together, but uses L1 and L2 as separate individual power circuits, then this appliance (the RV) uses the power as 110V.



50 Amp receptacles are the easiest and the safest to set up, with a L1 power line, a L2 power line, a neutral connection and a ground connection. The rest depends on the appliance being plugged into it.



As I stated previously, I have a 50 Amp receptacle set up in my shop. When I plug my coach into it, it uses it as a 110V power supply. When I plug my big shop air compressor or my welder into it, they use it as a 220V power supply.



30 Amp receptacles are a totally different story. They can be set up as 110V or 220V. I don't think the OP is asking about that.



Jim

Papa_Jim, you have partially restated what the above references show.

Your statement "receptacle connects L1 and L2 together, it uses the power as 220V." Is incorrect. When the load is connected to L1 and L2, you have 240vac not connected "together" which would cause a short.

And just FYI, there are RVs on the market today that utilize the 240vac capability for clothes dryers and cook top appliances.

The proper terminology for the service is "120/240vac/50amp split-phase. Exactly the same as supplied to your S&B house except not the higher amperage.


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Old 09-18-2015, 08:43 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Papa_Jim View Post
To answer the OP's question, are 50Amps 220 Volt?
The answer is Yes it can be. If the appliance plugged into the receptacle connects L1 and L2 together, it uses the power as 220V. If the appliance (the RV) does not connect L1 and L2 together, but uses L1 and L2 as separate individual power circuits, then this appliance (the RV) uses the power as 110V.
50 Amp receptacles are the easiest and the safest to set up, with a L1 power line, a L2 power line, a neutral connection and a ground connection. The rest depends on the appliance being plugged into it.
As I stated previously, I have a 50 Amp receptacle set up in my shop. When I plug my coach into it, it uses it as a 110V power supply. When I plug my big shop air compressor or my welder into it, they use it as a 220V power supply.
30 Amp receptacles are a totally different story. They can be set up as 110V or 220V. I don't think the OP is asking about that.
Jim
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That is an excellent reply/answer to the OP's question.
Correct and easily understood with no unnecessary technical mumbo-jumbo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shiggs68 View Post
Papa_Jim, you have partially restated what the above references show.
Your statement "receptacle connects L1 and L2 together, it uses the power as 220V." Is incorrect. When the load is connected to L1 and L2, you have 240vac not connected "together" which would cause a short.
And just FYI, there are RVs on the market today that utilize the 240vac capability for clothes dryers and cook top appliances.
The proper terminology for the service is "120/240vac/50amp split-phase. Exactly the same as supplied to your S&B house except not the higher amperage.
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shiggs68
Your comments to Papa_Jim are also correct.

EXCEPT for the fact that some older S&B homes have "120/240vac/50amp split-phase" electrical service from the power company....which IS EXACTLY THE SAME as the electrical service provided by most campground "50A" power pedestal receptacles.

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Old 09-19-2015, 08:04 AM   #49
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Papa_Jim
That is an excellent reply/answer to the OP's question.
Correct and easily understood with no unnecessary technical mumbo-jumbo.


shiggs68
Your comments to Papa_Jim are also correct.

EXCEPT for the fact that some older S&B homes have "120/240vac/50amp split-phase" electrical service from the power company....which IS EXACTLY THE SAME as the electrical service provided by most campground "50A" power pedestal receptacles.

Mel
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Not sure what you are saying and I guess I should have been more clear.

Most S&B homes have 120/240vac split-phase service in the 50/60/100/200amp range depending on age of the home and the local codes in effect at the time.

There is nothing special or mysterious about a 50amp RV service. In fact in some areas of the county, the same outlet is required for home clothes dryer installations.

The main point is that before plugging in your RV, you should either have a Surge Protector that checks for correct wiring and voltages or have a meter to manually check yourself and understanding what you are checking. This applies to both 30amp and 50amp RV services. Better safe then sorry.


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Old 09-19-2015, 08:26 AM   #50
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I'm trying to set up an electric pole for my monaco with a 50 amp service...is that 220 or 110?
The simple answer is that you need 220 volt at the plug pedestal. You split the 220 so you have 110/50 amp to Leg 1 and 110/50 amp leg 2 which will share a common neutral. These two legs are out phase so they can share the common ground. If you put a meter on leg 1 and leg 2 you will get 0 volts. If you look at a 50 amp plug on your unit it has on the top a common neutral pin, on each side is a hot blade (leg 1 and leg 2), and the bottom is the grounds. This has been stated by several members but may seem a little convoluted.
I would recommend you use an electrician. There are several other factors that need consideration such wire run distance from source which will determine wire gauge, etc.
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Old 09-19-2015, 09:16 AM   #51
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The simple answer is that you need 220 volt at the plug pedestal. You split the 220 so you have 110/50 amp to Leg 1 and 110/50 amp leg 2 which will share a common neutral. These two legs are out phase so they can share the common ground. If you put a meter on leg 1 and leg 2 you will get 0 volts. If you look at a 50 amp plug on your unit it has on the top a common neutral pin, on each side is a hot blade (leg 1 and leg 2), and the bottom is the grounds. This has been stated by several members but may seem a little convoluted.
I would recommend you use an electrician. There are several other factors that need consideration such wire run distance from source which will determine wire gauge, etc.
L1 to L2 volts will equal 240. See the diagrams.
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Old 09-19-2015, 09:23 AM   #52
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The simple answer is that you need 220 volt at the plug pedestal. You split the 220 so you have 110/50 amp to Leg 1 and 110/50 amp leg 2 which will share a common neutral. These two legs are out phase so they can share the common ground. If you put a meter on leg 1 and leg 2 you will get 0 volts. If you look at a 50 amp plug on your unit it has on the top a common neutral pin, on each side is a hot blade (leg 1 and leg 2), and the bottom is the grounds. This has been stated by several members but may seem a little convoluted.
I would recommend you use an electrician. There are several other factors that need consideration such wire run distance from source which will determine wire gauge, etc.

I think you understand the configuration but you had a brain fart. Under the above conditions, if you measure between L1& L2, you will measure 240 VCA if the service is installed correctly and L1 & L2 are out of phase. If this measurement is zero, then the service is wired with L1 & L2 in phase and there is a real possibility of over current on the neutral leg.

In reality you are not splitting 220 (240) you are just never using them both in the same circuit. Some coaches use 240 for a dryer or one element in an AquaHot. The capacity is present and all that's necessary to utilize a 240 circuit is installing a double pole breaker and sizing the wiring on that circuit appropriately.


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Old 09-19-2015, 11:30 AM   #53
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I think you understand the configuration but you had a brain fart. Under the above conditions, if you measure between L1& L2, you will measure 240 VCA if the service is installed correctly and L1 & L2 are out of phase. If this measurement is zero, then the service is wired with L1 & L2 in phase and there is a real possibility of over current on the neutral leg.

In reality you are not splitting 220 (240) you are just never using them both in the same circuit. Some coaches use 240 for a dryer or one element in an AquaHot. The capacity is present and all that's necessary to utilize a 240 circuit is installing a double pole breaker and sizing the wiring on that circuit appropriately.


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Yes, you are splitting the single phase 220 (240) by using a center tap on the distribution (utility power pole) transformer output windings so that only 110 (120) volts are seen between L1 or L2 and the center neutral tap.
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Old 09-19-2015, 03:22 PM   #54
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Semantics? "Split phase" is technically correct but mere techno-babble as far as practical usage at the power pole is concerned. If you connect the load between L1 & L2, it's 240v. No matter how you describe it.
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Old 09-19-2015, 03:59 PM   #55
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x2 skip nailed it. get answer
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Old 09-20-2015, 09:15 AM   #56
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Honestly I had no idea any MH actually used 240V. This must be a new thing with the advent of all electric coaches. The way I looked at it, even though there was 240 available, it was never intended to be used in a MH. There was just two 120 feeds to supply enough power for all the goodies inside a big house on wheels.

So the answer in my eyes is just wire it correctly and who cares how you look at it as long as it is safe and works.
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