Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-18-2013, 06:08 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
CountryFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Between the Oceans
Posts: 3,532
Blog Entries: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by topdownman View Post
Mine drives itself. No comparison between a gasser and diesel. My advice is don't drive a diesel if you're not sure. Once you drive one, it'd be hard to go back.
roflmao ... you sounded like saying coke - don't try it, once you did you will not stop... agree with you
__________________

__________________
2000 Country Coach Intrigue 40', ISC 350
2014 Ford C-Max Energi
CountryFit is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-18-2013, 09:32 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 624
Thanks for all the excellent feedback!

Something I have been hearing but quite don't understand is this perception that diesels need to be driven. This I don't quite understand.

In a year's time, I drive one hour to tailgate for football games 10 times annually. We go camping to locations within 4 hours distance towing a Jeep 4-5 times annually. I haul a trailer with 3 atv's up to 3 hours away 5-6 times annually. The atv camping is typically across grass fields to isolated locations in the Appalachian mountains.

That is about my entire year in a nutshell. Am I not going to get enough drive time on a DP? And/Or is a DP overkill for my application?

Thanks again!
__________________

__________________
2015 Thor ACE EVO30.1

EricGT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2013, 10:15 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
sswilson's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Cobble Hill, B.C.
Posts: 1,283
It comes down to how deep your pockets are. Other than knowing air brakes, diesels are no more difficult to drive than gasses. Gassers can be quite a bit cheaper to purchase and maintain. Have a good look around and see what you can buy for what money you want to spend. Driving difficulty is not an issue.
__________________
Steve and Sheri with Archie (and Hiro, R.I.P.)
2000 Winnebago 35U, Ford F53/6.8l V10
F150 Ford and Vintage Aspencade.
sswilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 01:08 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
VanDiemen23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 778
Condensation is more of a problem with Diesels than gassers. It can get in the fuel, in the air system, etc. Using the coach will mean you get the chance to drain the separator and the air lines more often. There's a lot of other perceptions about diesels not liking to sit, but I don't see the physics behind the myth.

On rough off-road excursions the air bags will allow more motion in the coach. My rollover alarm goes off frequently on departures from uneven campsites, etc. the suspension feel is a lot different than a gasser.

Depending on where you live and the season, you end up driving off the temperature gauge more than the speedometer. Many diesels have marginal cooling, so when it gets over 215 or so you have to slow dow, gear down, and reduce the horsepower demand while increasing the cooling system throughput.

You also have to stay on top of gearing more than a gasser and the use of the engine brake. The layout of the switches and controls can make this easy, or hard. I'm considering moving the exhaust brake switch to a button on the steering wheel or an old dimmer switch on the floor, because the genius that laid out my coach's panel put the brake switch somewhere south of my elbow, where I have to take my eyes off the road for a long time to find it. Maybe a stick-on dot of some kind.....
__________________
VanDiemen23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 05:53 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hanover, PA
Posts: 624
So overheating is more of an issue than with gassers?
It appears the Journey is the rear radiator design. However, I believe most Diesels are. ???
__________________
2015 Thor ACE EVO30.1

EricGT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 07:40 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Steve Ownby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cosby, Tn
Posts: 6,394
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricGT View Post
Thanks for all the excellent feedback!

Something I have been hearing but quite don't understand is this perception that diesels need to be driven. This I don't quite understand.

In a year's time, I drive one hour to tailgate for football games 10 times annually. We go camping to locations within 4 hours distance towing a Jeep 4-5 times annually. I haul a trailer with 3 atv's up to 3 hours away 5-6 times annually. The atv camping is typically across grass fields to isolated locations in the Appalachian mountains.

That is about my entire year in a nutshell. Am I not going to get enough drive time on a DP? And/Or is a DP overkill for my application?

Thanks again!
Your driving schedule is fine with either fuel type. Just top up the tank before you park. Towing will be easier with the DP. The question of "overkill" has more to do with your expectations for a coach. A good bit of the difference between a gas & diesel motorhome is weight. Gas chassis top out in the 20-23k range. Diesels start there. Gas chassis come from the automotive industry and diesel chassis come from heavy trucks. A gas engine in a motorhome will be operating at the top end of its capability. The diesel will be loafing. Gas engines make their torque and hp at rpms in the 3500-5000 range. Diesels generally have their torque peak below 1500 and hp peak around 2000. The heat management issue is not from marginal cooling systems but from the fact that diesels are turbo charged. The turbo is a heat engine and there just isn't enough real estate for a radiator package that could hold a steady temp in all power conditions. This just requires driver management on long up hill grades. Side radiator configurations are more expensive but stay cleaner and make engine access or maintenance much easier.

If I were you, I would be looking at coaches a little older & higher quality. With a diesel the age and miles are no issue and its all about the level on care it has received.
__________________
Steve Ownby
Full time since 2007
2003 Monaco Signature
Steve Ownby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 07:45 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
topdownman's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 1,462
This is wrong, people are over-analyzing diesels. If that's your thing, fine. I let Mr. Allison decide when to shift mine and in a little over 12,000 miles of driving my diesel, never had it overheat in the mountains or anywhere. I usually let the cruise control do its thing. In my mind, it's a lot easier to overheat a gasser than a diesel. My gasser was pushing the limit. My little old 300 HP ISB just cruises along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricGT View Post
So overheating is more of an issue than with gassers?
It appears the Journey is the rear radiator design. However, I believe most Diesels are. ???
__________________
Mark Anderson - FMCA 351514 - Louisville, KY
2011 Tiffin Phaeton 40QTH - Freightliner / Cummins
2006 Jeep Commander
Cricket SW3 Personal Transporter
topdownman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 10:57 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Country Coach Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redding
Posts: 3,412
The ground clearance of the target rig should be noted. Our 38' DP appears to have less clearance than other do. Off road travel would require care in a 36' rig.
__________________
Dean
1995 CC Magna #5280
C8.3L 300hp Cummins, 31,000lbs
deandec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 06:13 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
gemini5362's Avatar
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,078
Quote:
Originally Posted by topdownman View Post
This is wrong, people are over-analyzing diesels. If that's your thing, fine. I let Mr. Allison decide when to shift mine and in a little over 12,000 miles of driving my diesel, never had it overheat in the mountains or anywhere. I usually let the cruise control do its thing. In my mind, it's a lot easier to overheat a gasser than a diesel. My gasser was pushing the limit. My little old 300 HP ISB just cruises along.
You are very incorrect. I found this out while driving to california when I hit the sierra nevada mountains. My coach started heating up fast when I got to higher elevations and it was 100 degrees outside. I actually pulled over and let it cool off because I thought something was wrong. I drove about another 1/4 mile and had to pull over again. It cooled off immediately when i pulled over. I started out again and though I would try downshifting to see if I could keep it running cooler. I made it to the top of that mountain and pulled off at a rest area. After making a stop at the next rest area to check coolant levels and everything I could not find anything wrong. I thought I would do something really stupid and read the owners manual. It says when going up steep grades in higer temp situation to manually downshift the engine to keep the RPMs at maximum for cooler operation. I believe part of the problem is that the radiator systems are not big enough when you consider that you have a package of radiators stacked together limiting air flow through them all.
__________________
gemini5362 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 06:20 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
gemini5362's Avatar
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,078
I live on a dirt road for about 1/4 mile. I do not have any problems driving down the dirt road other than every year I get to help my neighbors trim trees that are over the road at heights of less than 13 feet

I cannot imagine driving off road in my DP. Where I park at my house I have a small concrete pad that I drive over. It only sticks up about two inches above the ground. It feels like I am driving over a major obstacle course when I drive over it and I go as slow as possible.


I see a lot of people on here that are adamant that you have to knjow about air brakes and air brake maintenance before driving them. I understand that some states and countries make you take an air brake test. I really do not understand why. Unless it is a requirement of to get a license to drive your MH I think the only thing you really need to know about Air brake maintenance is where is a good garage to get that work done and do you need a small bank loan to pay for it. I cannot imagine many people that do their own air brake maintenance. I never intend to and do not really see a reason to know how to.
__________________
gemini5362 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 06:44 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Alpine Owners Club
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Olympia
Posts: 670
Driving off road is OK as long as the area has a hard surface and not a lot of potholes. We frequently dry camp in the desert, sometimes driving a mile or more off road. In the area around Quartzsite AZ crossing dry riverbeds is normal.
__________________
Jeff
'99 Alpine Coach
Jeff and Cheryl is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 06:45 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Kenc1325's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Welland,Ontario
Posts: 137
I agree to all comments do yourself a favor and learn about the air brakes and how they work with the gauges . Along with the emergency brake . It will make your driving a lot safer . I am trading up myself from gas and looking forward to it but I have driven straight truck with air brakes for 20 years . I am in Canada and we have to get a special licence to drive with air brakes . Even though it is a pain but it gives us knowledge on what it going on and the differences between hydraulic . Good luck and safe travels .

Ken a new Tuscanny 40 FX owner
__________________
Kenc1325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 07:01 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Winnebago Owners Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 713
A couple of things are very noticeable, the first is there is no engine compression so when you let up on the gas it keeps going especially down hill so gearing down doesn't help much. This is where your "Jake Brake" comes into use. Fried my brakes when I lost mine coming down the Sierras. Pushers have the front wheels behind the driver rather than in front so the wheel cut can be much sharper especially when backing.
Hard to get used to, not at all. Getting gored at the fuel pump and maintenance fees is a personal matter.

Don G.
__________________
Grimesy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2013, 07:06 PM   #28
Moderator Emeritus
 
RickO's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Litchfield Park, Arizona
Posts: 10,530
Quote:
Originally Posted by topdownman View Post
This is wrong, people are over-analyzing diesels. If that's your thing, fine. I let Mr. Allison decide when to shift mine and in a little over 12,000 miles of driving my diesel, never had it overheat in the mountains or anywhere. I usually let the cruise control do its thing. In my mind, it's a lot easier to overheat a gasser than a diesel. My gasser was pushing the limit. My little old 300 HP ISB just cruises along.
Sounds like your coach cools really well.

On my maiden voyage I had the misfortune of having to be towed off of the Grapevine on I5 heading south to LA. They towed me to a Cummins shop. The problem code was just low coolant but the tech made a point of telling me I needed to be sure to manually downshift on steep grades (in hot weather) to keep the RPM up so as to keep the temp in line.

Since that time I've covered >50,000 miles and always drive the mountains that way. I can watch the temp on the VMSPc begin to rise and when it hits around 200 I downshift and keep the engine around 2100 RPM. The temp gauge dictates how fast I crest a hill.

Rick
__________________

__________________
Rick, Nancy, Peanut & Lola our Westie Dogs & Bailey the Sheltie.

2007 Itasca Ellipse 40FD
RickO is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diesel



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.