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Old 06-28-2015, 05:23 PM   #1
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Assistance requested, Goldwing on a lift.

Looking for anyone that hauls a Goldwing on an Overbuilt or Cruiserlift lift system. I am interested in how you tie your bike down and what tie down straps you use.

I just installed an Overbuilt and loaded the bike for the first time today here at the house for a test. First off the tie down points on the lift (forward) are way to far back causing straps to littlerally pull straight down instead of out front. This give no true anchoring effect. Also ALL of my tie down straps are too long between the hooks and the ratchet. I think this is primarily becasue the tiedowns are straight down instead of out front.

Would like to hear from anyone hauling a wing on one of these lifts to see what you are doing.

Thanks,
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Old 06-28-2015, 05:27 PM   #2
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Here's a link to some previous threads on this subject that may assist.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Gold...com&gws_rd=ssl
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Old 06-28-2015, 09:40 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrchips View Post
Looking for anyone that hauls a Goldwing on an Overbuilt or Cruiserlift lift system. I am interested in how you tie your bike down and what tie down straps you use.

I just installed an Overbuilt and loaded the bike for the first time today here at the house for a test. First off the tie down points on the lift (forward) are way to far back causing straps to littlerally pull straight down instead of out front. This give no true anchoring effect. Also ALL of my tie down straps are too long between the hooks and the ratchet. I think this is primarily becasue the tiedowns are straight down instead of out front.

Would like to hear from anyone hauling a wing on one of these lifts to see what you are doing.

Thanks,
Mr. Chips,
Well Sir, I used the Hydralift in hauling my Wing but, tying the big girls down is the same on any lift. Yes, many of those lifts have improper spacing when it comes to a GL 1800. And that causes improper tie down angles on your straps. Well, me being me, I'm kind of a "MacGuyver" type. I figure out what's needed and, just go from there. On the Hydralift, the forward tie down points were, apparently exactly like yours are on your Overbuilt. And by utilizing them, it did cause the tie down straps to be pulled straight down, not forward and down, as needed.

So, I looked under the lift and, determined that I needed a sub-frame addition to accommodate the additional tie downs that I had in mind for appropriately tying down the Wing. I had to weld up a structure that would mold right into the underside of that lift and yet, be as strong as any portion of the original lift. I bolted it to the lift, not welded it, just in case I ever sold that lift and, it was not to a Wing pilot.


I then drilled that new substructure and, added the eye bolts I used for tie down points. Note: The angle of the tie straps for a triple tree tie base, was carefully calculated for the positioning of the new eye bolts I had to add to the new sub structure. As you know, there's chrome fork covers etc. that are a possible hindrance to proper tie angles and straps. So, I placed the tie straps in position on the modified fork brackets (I'll explain those in a minute) and, then held the straps in place at the EXACT angle needed so as to not interfere with those chrome fork covers and mark the position needed to drill the new sub structure.

When done, those new tie down points were EXACTLY PERFECT in angle to pull forward and down, and not have interference with any portion of the bike, fender, chrome fork covers and etc. But, I'm kind-a anal about things like loosing a 900 lb. bike so, I also utilize the forward and rear, crash bars, to be tied to the existing factory supplied tie down points. That way, I've got SIX TIE DOWNS holding that big girl on that lift. I want it on there when I arrive at my next camp site.

The "modified fork brackets" I mentioned earlier are a simply bracket that I came up with for use when tying the Wing down. If I have them, I'll link some pictures of them. What they are is a simple plate, drilled to the exact measurements of the lower tree clamp bolts. And, there's a large hole in the bracket for tie down hooks. What these brackets do is, eliminate the need for "soft ties" used for wrapping around the triple tree in GL 1800 applications and tying it down in the front end.

I hope I've come across with a good enough explanation of what you might need to accomplish tying that big girl down. If not, surely PM me and, I'd be seriously happy in assisting you with this issue. I suspect you want yours in place to when you arrive at your next camp spot/RV park.
Scott







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Old 06-29-2015, 07:35 AM   #4
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Fire Up, thanks for the reply. Yea I was pretty sure I was going to have to rebuild my lift with new tie down points. Just didn't want to...lol Neat idea on the tie down brackets on your triple trees. Had not thought of that idea, although soft ties aren't much of an issue to go over them. Guess it's time to get some steel and fire up the ole welder...lol
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Old 06-29-2015, 08:06 AM   #5
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I also tie down via softies on the tripple clamp, just watch the brake lines in that area when to attach the softie.

It is not recomended use of the small crash bars in front of the side bags. Others have broke them. If you look closely at them, they are not very stout. My best tie is as follows..........

I remove the side covers, easily done. Wrap them in old towels and store. I then place a softie around the round frame tube that is revealed by the side cover removal. This makes a very tight, and relitively high tie point. Staps go down and forward pulling the bike into the front wheel chock. This provides you the side strenght (given in the lift the bike side is facing forward) if a sudden stop occured.

I add all the softies to the bike before I load, once in place just add the straps.

Many thousands of miles with this config.. The bike is solid. Use quality ratchet straps, replace if they fray or get ragged.

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Old 06-29-2015, 03:23 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Mrchips View Post
Fire Up, thanks for the reply. Yea I was pretty sure I was going to have to rebuild my lift with new tie down points. Just didn't want to...lol Neat idea on the tie down brackets on your triple trees. Had not thought of that idea, although soft ties aren't much of an issue to go over them. Guess it's time to get some steel and fire up the ole welder...lol

Mrchips,
You're correct that the soft ties are not much of an issue. Yep, I've used them quite a few times in the past. I did the bracket thing mainly because of the logistics of length of tie down vs the ratchet head, sewing of the loops on the tie downs and more. Eliminating that soft tie gave me more useable length of the tie strap, as it leaves the ratchet head. And, based on the mods to the Hydralift sub frame, I needed every inch I could acquire on those front ratchet tie downs.

As you well know, normally ratchet tie downs don't have close, end-to-end or, Hook-to-hook proximity issues 'cause they're tying things down that have longer distances between the strap ends. But, based on the triple tree distance to the new eye bolts I installed, the mechanism, sewing points etc. were almost in the way of ratcheting things down, if I continued the use of soft ties.

So, hence the idea of the brackets came along. All it did was make the distanced between the ends of the straps on the ratchets longer which, allowed for no issues of running into sewing points etc. when ratcheting things down. I hope all this makes sense.
Scott


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd in S.C. View Post
I also tie down via softies on the tripple clamp, just watch the brake lines in that area when to attach the softie.

It is not recomended use of the small crash bars in front of the side bags. Others have broke them. If you look closely at them, they are not very stout. My best tie is as follows..........

I remove the side covers, easily done. Wrap them in old towels and store. I then place a softie around the round frame tube that is revealed by the side cover removal. This makes a very tight, and relitively high tie point. Staps go down and forward pulling the bike into the front wheel chock. This provides you the side strenght (given in the lift the bike side is facing forward) if a sudden stop occured.

I add all the softies to the bike before I load, once in place just add the straps.

Many thousands of miles with this config.. The bike is solid. Use quality ratchet straps, replace if they fray or get ragged.

L.
L.
Yeah, it might not be recommended to use the crash bars but, I, several other Wing owners and, Honda, have used them for years without issues. I say "Honda" cause in many cases, they use them for tying down the bikes while being shipped. And, to the best of my knowledge, none have been broken when the dealers opened up the crates.

As stated above, I've used the soft ties several times, for many thousands of miles. They work, no problems there. I just needed a different arrangement for my application so, I invented the adapter brackets.

As for using the "crotch Y" on the side frame, I've also used that for a few zillion miles when I hauled my '02 1800 in my enclosed trailer. I now use the same frame intersection and, A SOFT TIE in my present situation when hauling our '08 Wing on our Rampage Lift/carrier in the back of our '11 GMC Sierra 4x4 Extended Cab. But, while using not only the brackets I installed on the triple tree bolts for a tie down on each side, I also use the front crash bars too. Then I use the crotch-Y frame attachment points for pulling slightly to the rear and down.

That way, just like when I hauled it on the Hydralift using 6 tie down points, I have 6 when hauling it in our truck, behind the motor home. I inspect all those tie down sections of the bike on a very frequent basis when we're hauling it. The use of the crash bars as tie down points is merely secondary and, while they are tight, they are not doing the main stabilization of the bike. That is taken care of by the ones from the triple tree area of the forks.
Scott
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Old 06-29-2015, 07:14 PM   #7
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I am actually considering a solid mounted rretractable ratchet system for the front two straps. This way I don't have the length, or lack of issues I am now facing. I found some that are pretty nice and can either bolt to the carrier or if I wanted they come with a bolt on second hook for that end. I would solid bolt them to my lift. I still need to weld some extensions on though so I can get some forward angle to my front straps. It may just be that we are so used to pulling well forward on those that we "think" we have to, when in actuality we may not and may be able to pull more downward, beats me. As for using the crash bars, I typically don't use the rear crash bars. I typically just wrap a wheel spoke and pull both ways. If you keep the rear wheel stationary and let the suspension work it just seems to work better and take the jolt out of it. I have trailered all over the country in a trailer and never had an issue at all. I also use two soft ties on the triple trees thus giving me four tie down points and do not use the forward crash bars either. I don't pull the side covers off and on the 12+ wings the side covers fit under the saddlebag lids as opposed to the pre 12.
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Old 06-29-2015, 08:22 PM   #8
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I am actually considering a solid mounted rretractable ratchet system for the front two straps. This way I don't have the length, or lack of issues I am now facing. I found some that are pretty nice and can either bolt to the carrier or if I wanted they come with a bolt on second hook for that end. I would solid bolt them to my lift. I still need to weld some extensions on though so I can get some forward angle to my front straps. It may just be that we are so used to pulling well forward on those that we "think" we have to, when in actuality we may not and may be able to pull more downward, beats me. As for using the crash bars, I typically don't use the rear crash bars. I typically just wrap a wheel spoke and pull both ways. If you keep the rear wheel stationary and let the suspension work it just seems to work better and take the jolt out of it. I have trailered all over the country in a trailer and never had an issue at all. I also use two soft ties on the triple trees thus giving me four tie down points and do not use the forward crash bars either. I don't pull the side covers off and on the 12+ wings the side covers fit under the saddlebag lids as opposed to the pre 12.
Mrchips,
Roger that Sir. If what ever system you've used has worked for you so far, then there's most likely no need to adapt to any other one. As for "pulling" forward, AND out, on the front fork issue, I personally think it's of value. The main reason is, it gives two dimension lateral support, from a higher point of attachment. This is the same principle or theory on the frame section under the side covers. In any case, sounds like you've got your tie down system covered. Good luck.
Scott
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Old 06-29-2015, 08:45 PM   #9
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Mrchips,
Roger that Sir. If what ever system you've used has worked for you so far, then there's most likely no need to adapt to any other one. As for "pulling" forward, AND out, on the front fork issue, I personally think it's of value. The main reason is, it gives two dimension lateral support, from a higher point of attachment. This is the same principle or theory on the frame section under the side covers. In any case, sounds like you've got your tie down system covered. Good luck.
Scott
Don't get me wrong, I am going to rig mine to pull forward and down becasue I believe that is the best way. I think of it as a three legged stool, all the legs don't go straight down for a reason...lol it just sux to spend so much, then do so much work to get it all installed only to figure out the tie down points are no where near correct. You would think that lift builders would do some actual measurements when they build their lifts. As SO WHAT if they put them too far out front for smaller bikes, just makes for a better overall anchor point.
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Old 06-30-2015, 06:57 AM   #10
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Don't lose sight of,,,,, you are tying the bike down so it don't fall off,,,,, BUT you really need to tie it down for when that accident occurs that none of us have planned. A 820lb Goldwing is realy heavy when it goes from XX speed to zero in 50 feet.

Checkout the Gl1800riders forum, the crash bars do break. They are only configured for force directed toward the bike.

The tie downs on this site are very good. Locked ends, built in soft loop, wide webbing. While there also check out his tools. I have many of them on my Adventure bike. He has a cool socket for removing the Goldwing rear wheel.

Motorcycle Tools, ATV Tools, Tool Roll Kits, JIS Tools | Abbeville,AL

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Old 06-30-2015, 01:20 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Lloyd in S.C. View Post
Don't lose sight of,,,,, you are tying the bike down so it don't fall off,,,,, BUT you really need to tie it down for when that accident occurs that none of us have planned. A 820lb Goldwing is realy heavy when it goes from XX speed to zero in 50 feet.

Checkout the Gl1800riders forum, the crash bars do break. They are only configured for force directed toward the bike.

The tie downs on this site are very good. Locked ends, built in soft loop, wide webbing. While there also check out his tools. I have many of them on my Adventure bike. He has a cool socket for removing the Goldwing rear wheel.

Motorcycle Tools, ATV Tools, Tool Roll Kits, JIS Tools | Abbeville,AL

L.
I have two brand new sets of tie downs almost identical to those. Problem is they are too long. When I attach them to the bike over the triples the ratchet is nearly at the tie down point. That's what started this whole thread. There is not enough room between bike and tie down point on the lift because that point is nearly straight down from triples instead of out front where they should be.
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Old 06-30-2015, 02:06 PM   #12
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Okay, yes got that. But thought you were thinking about creating tire down points further forward?

Sorry didn't mean to confuse.

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Old 06-30-2015, 05:03 PM   #13
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Don't get me wrong, I am going to rig mine to pull forward and down becasue I believe that is the best way. I think of it as a three legged stool, all the legs don't go straight down for a reason...lol it just sux to spend so much, then do so much work to get it all installed only to figure out the tie down points are no where near correct. You would think that lift builders would do some actual measurements when they build their lifts. As SO WHAT if they put them too far out front for smaller bikes, just makes for a better overall anchor point.
Chips,
I agree. The "Hydralift" is by far, the most expensive lift/carrier out there but, like your Overbuilt, they didn't place the tie points where needed. But, in theirs and Overbuilts defense, it's pretty hard to setup tie points so that they are in "ultimate" positions, for all cruisers that will or could be hauled on these lifts and, the specific angles that would be utilized for each tie down, on all the intended bikes.

As for your "traffic jamb" of tie down ratchet vs ends of the straps(looped ends) due to, too short of a distance in available space/length, this is precisely why I created the brackets you see in the pictures. It really helped with the needed length. And, they're on there semi-permanently. They get used all the time when I'm transporting the big girl.

One more thing, I don't know the present configuration or, most recent version of the Overbuilt but, on my Hydralift, it only comes basically with the tire stop for the front tire. That meant I'd have to put down the kickstand, while on that lift, not good. So, I "MacGuyvered" the OVERCENTER wheel chock from my Condor Wheel Chock unit to fit onto the Hydralift. Now, I drive on, the front wheel hits the overcenter chock and, flips it forward to lock the front wheel against the factory stop.

That intern, holds the bike completely straight up and down, with no assistance needed. I can then get off and do all my tie down work. Hydralift sells, as an option, that same kind of over center chock but, at twice the price of the replacement one for my Condor. So, guess which one I used....

Quote:
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Okay, yes got that. But thought you were thinking about creating tire down points further forward?

Sorry didn't mean to confuse.
L.
Lloyd,
This is specifically why I created the additional substructure for my Hydralift. They didn't place the tie points where we, as GL 1800 owners NEED THEM for appropriate angle/pull for the front end. So, I fabricated up the steel tubing which provided for the strength for the new eye bolts, and placed it in such a position that it's not seen, unless you were to look under that lift. All you saw were the eye bolts.

It is too bad that we (anyone who hauls a Wing on just about any lift) needs to modify things so that our Wings are carried correctly and are still there at the end of our destinations. But, you have to do what you have to do, in order to make things right.
Scott
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Old 06-30-2015, 09:52 PM   #14
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Yea I also have a rocing type wheel chock in my trailer that I am going to pull out and try to modify to fit the channel of my lift. Problem now is the lift channel is only about 8" wide and my wheel chock is about 12". I will probably weld some bolt taps on the sides of the channel when I do the tie down relocations that will alow me to bolt my chock down. Gonna just have to take it all in the shop and see how it all will go. At this rate I may as well design my own lift...lol
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