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Old 03-26-2014, 12:10 PM   #29
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Here in Pennsylvania, frost and bad winters, Start with a good gravel base, compacted with a machine or time and rain will do it if you have the time, a good sand base, In my Fathers 50 years of excavating, when cement lifted from the frost and winter and did not come back down to it original spot when the frost left, was due to a stone or rock that fell off the bottom of the pad and did not return to its original spot thus keeping the pad up. So all the cement that I poured was a good compacted gravel base, 3"-4" of sand to cover the gravel and make a smooth level surface, 3/4" celotex insulation(frost deterrent, all my cement is poured on it, even inside the garage, never lifted, any of it) 2"x6" for form boards (5"-1/2" thick pour) , fiber-crete and a 6 bag mix, no re-bar in any of my concrete. If you have ever had to dig up and remove concrete that has fiber in it , you know what I mean. The fiber in the cement did away with the need for re bar in home cement use. The celotex insulation is the key if you live where frost might lift your concrete, it also keep the ground moisture from making the cement sweat on those humid days and nights inside the garage. Good luck with your cement project.
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Old 03-26-2014, 02:22 PM   #30
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We replaced our aging and cracking driveway last summer and upgraded the construction. Its is not inexpensive but I want it to handle the weight of our coach (30K lbs) and hopefully be the last driveway I ever install. Also needs to handle our cold winters and hot summers.

I met with 4 different concrete experts and this is the construction we went with:
6" compacted Class 6 base
6" 4,000 psi concrete with fiber mesh and 3/8" rebar
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:24 PM   #31
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Guys the base is the key, in Tennessee our frost line is 13", in Wisconsin I am sure that is not nearly enough, call your local concrete company and they can tell you. The bottom of the base needs to be below the freeze line. If you read the first post I suggested you turn down the edge of the slab, the turn down on the concrete needs to be below the frost line. As for cracking, concrete cracks but if a pad is 16' wide and 60' long. there needs to be a joints, at the 8' line down the center of the entire pad, if the pad is 4", the saw cut needs to be at least 1.5". then divide the by 8' and cut the cross cuts as close to make the cut sections as close to 8' by by 8'. 60' divided by 8' would be 7.5', making sure it is cut to 1.5" depth. After you make saw cuts, buy some good masonry caulking product and fill the saw cuts with the caulk, if the pad butts a building or wall you will need some expansion material, you can buy some 1/2" fibrous material , also buy some plastic caps to fit over the expansion material, then after the pour and you start caulking pull the cap and fill the joint with the same caulk to seal it and make it water tight. If you want steel (#5) put it in the turn down, make sure the wire goes all the way to the edge. Make sure the steel is about half way from the bottom of the turn down to the top of the concrete, as for the wire we use chairs, it holds the wire up in the concrete 2". You would be surprised the concrete that was poured and walked on and never pulled up in the concrete, You can make this as expensive as you want, but remember you are not going to live forever, your RV is not going to sink if it is poured right but more than likely it will crack. One other thing, after you cut and caulk, ask the concrete company what would be the best sealer for your area, seal it and then seal it again. the work under the concrete is far more important than the concrete, the best concrete will come apart on top of a bad compacted base. There are so many things that cause concrete problems, do not let the finisher add to much water, we used to use a thing that was called a jitterbug, pushes the rock down in the concrete cause scaling later, use limestone aggregate not river rock, cost more but helps the strength of the concrete. Good luck
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:26 AM   #32
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Did not know their was so much to learn about having a good lasting concrete pad for your motorhome. But you guys are right. If you are going to do it do it right.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:28 AM   #33
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As stated, much depends on what is under the concrete. I had a nice sand/gravel soil beneath my 30 year old asphalt drive that was as good as any sand they would bring in. No real cracking in the old drive from base failure, except where a trench near the street was not compacted properly before the house was built (1975) and a few contraction cracks from temp changes. Well drained. Being a civil engineer and knowing issues that cause failure, I went with 5" of fiber (2 bags per cy) reinforced 3500 psi air entrained mix. No mesh or rebar. Drive is now 7 years old, been running my 11 ton RV on it for 5 years, no cracking whatsoever. Remember most 4" concrete is only as thick as the edge of a 2x4 or 3.5". And make sure they properly compact the base before pouring the concrete with a vibratory roller, not just a plate compactor. And cure the concrete for at least a week with a sprayed curing membrane, continuous light sprinkling or plastic covering. Don't let it bake in the sun and dry out. Concrete cures with a chemical reaction, not by drying out. Keep your RV off it for 28 days. Collect the load tickets from the truck to verify they delivered the right mix and exactly how much they delivered which should match your calculated cubic yards based on thickness and area. Let the contractor know ahead of time you will be doing this so he doesn't try to cheat on thickness. If I had anticipated ever getting a DP, I would have gone with 6" thickness.

And if you have poor underlying soils, things get more complicated. And if you live in an area with expansive clay soils or on top of an old fill, all bets are off.
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:34 PM   #34
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When we had our third driveway done for an RV parking place 8 years ago, the contractor we used suggested that the section where the rig would sit should be more substantial than the approach section. Although we only had a 26' Class C at the time, we could envisage getting something bigger, so we agreed.

The pad where the RV sits for the winter is 6" thick and 25' long. It has more re-bar (not pre-tensioned) and a denser aggregate. The difference in cost was less then $300, in a $3500 total. The total driveway length from the street is about 70' and the remainder is 4" thick.
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:55 AM   #35
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I’m no concrete expert, but have had quite a lot of it poured in my lifetime. My slab was poured under my existing shed. The slab was 28 x 44. I used a concrete contractor who did all the work for my recently built house. When planning my job, he told me NOT to pour around the steel posts supporting my pole shed, saying the concrete was sure to crack if it encircled a post near the concrete’s edge. I had to do that, anyway, because I planned to later use it as a footing in the event I had a short brick wall built on each side of the shed. Although he said he thought 4000# concrete with fiber would be OK if 6” thick, I decided on my own to add rebar. I put in 1/2” rebar on 24” centers with an extra row around the edges. I encircled each post with a rectangular rebar framework, and ran rebar close to the edge all the way around. My contractor said he still suspected that the concrete would crack around the posts.

On the entry end of the shed, I had the forms go downward into the ground, so that the concrete ended at a point several inches BELOW grade. In that entry apron section, I used rebar spaced much closer, and had extra rebar leading from the apron into the flat part of the slab. In the apron area, I had it poured 8” thick.

The pour was in early spring when the temps were typically in the 60’s for highs, with 40’s overnight. The slab was covered by the shed and got very little direct sunlight, and I watered it daily for a month before moving my 31,000# DP onto it. The slab is now a year old, has had a variety of heavy
vehicles on it, and to my amazement and that of the contractor, does not have even one tiny crack.

The one thing I did that was out of the ordinary was with the rebar. I WELDED every joint of it, and welded it to every stake driven in the ground to support it. All the rectangles of rebar around the posts were especially thoroughly welded and multiply tied to the slab rebar. I can’t say definitively that the welding made any difference. But you can bet I’ll do it that way again when I pour the next slab!

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Old 03-28-2014, 07:45 AM   #36
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We went with rebar and 5" concrete because of weight. Just feel comfortable with 5"
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Old 03-28-2014, 11:26 AM   #37
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Has anyone done the concrete runners? My rv is in storage but I would like to keep it at home. I have a small asphalt for my cars on one side and would like to park the rv on the other side of the house that had several trees removed and the roots are still there and grass and a small slope. The road base or concrete runners may work. Would like to hear from those that did either one. Thanks
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:19 PM   #38
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concrete pad....

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbt803 View Post
Has anyone done the concrete runners? My rv is in storage but I would like to keep it at home. I have a small asphalt for my cars on one side and would like to park the rv on the other side of the house that had several trees removed and the roots are still there and grass and a small slope. The road base or concrete runners may work. Would like to hear from those that did either one. Thanks
Debbie
Anything will work to park on Debbie, gravel w/moisture barrier, cement runners with a heavy moisture barrier in the middle to cut down on ground moisture, and if you can just pour a pad as to limit the ground moisture from getting to your under carriage as it will corrode and rust faster while sitting.
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:37 PM   #39
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:25 AM   #40
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I am assuming that you are considering runners about 24" wide, just remember, when you pour 24" x 50' you are increasing the pounds per square foot, so instead of 12' wide by 50' long would distribute the weight over 600 sq. feet where the 24" x 50' would distribute the weight over 100 squire feet. There may be more pressure on the particular point where the tires actually set but you are more likely to crack a 24' piece of concrete than a 12' piece. The weigh is spread throughout the slab, more sq. footage means more distribution.
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:17 AM   #41
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After reading this I know our driveway was not designed to last. This year the frost line exceeded 36" and I know they didn't put more than a few inches of gravel down. The joints aren't cut, they look molded in and are about 3/8" wide and about that deep. The stamped, decorative concrete on the sides is saw cut but has still cracked in several places. They put felt between the drive and garage but the drive is sinking and the felt is sticking out. The patio they pored out back has moved away from the foundation of the house and we have a 1/2" gap. The felt fell into the gap. I wish I had known more before we started. Sorry if I've gotten off topic but I am learning a lot about what should have been done.
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:03 AM   #42
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Concrete is certainly the best route to go, but not necessary. I built an RV port 10 years ago in a shaded area. It is 50' long and 14' wide. It is just compacted gravel with some road base mixed in. Being out of the wind, little or no moisture gets to the tire area, so it's very dry. Our 03 Phaeton tires were 8 years old when we traded and still showed no sign of aging. Build whatever you can afford or want, but concrete in not needed.

On the other hand, my son just built a building to store his motorhome, trailer, boat and other toys. 80' X 100' with a heated concrete floor, full rv hookups, shop with hoist and all new snap-on tools. I paid $9,000 for my RV port, but he won't tell me what his cost. Maybe he will let me come and work on mine sometime.
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