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Old 11-10-2019, 07:35 PM   #15
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Picking up my first DP next week. Is it recommended that it have a full tank of fuel if its going to be parked for the winter? Certainly would prevent condensation.
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Old 11-10-2019, 08:00 PM   #16
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For the past 19 years that we have had a diesel pusher, I have never used any additives in the diesel tank. I just run naked as far as the fuel goes. We take the coach to several snow ski areas several times a winter where temperatures have gotten down to -5 degrees F. I guess we have been lucky, because I've never experienced any problems with fuel. ... or maybe these additives are just advertising gimmicks to convincing people to buy something they don't need.
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Old 11-10-2019, 09:02 PM   #17
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I have seen plenty of diesel trucks froze up on the side of the interstate. In a lot of cases, the fuel is so solidified that the truck has to be kept in a heated garage for a day or more to thaw out. Now a motorhome is not as susceptible as a truck to freezing as the fuel tank is internal whereas a truck has exposed fuel tank(s). But once the fuel has been saturated with cold, the result can be the same.
Personally, if you want to save the $10 and take a chance on a large tow & shop bill then I say go for it.
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Old 11-10-2019, 09:19 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave&ginny View Post
#1. Never trust the stations to winterize the fuel enough.
#2 in most cases, we’re all running “biodiesel”. If you look on the directions of the product, it says to DOUBLE the amount of treatment.

#3 it won’t hurt the engine to use too much treatment.
#4 the fuel must be treated before it starts to “wax”. Once it starts to wax, you must use 911 treatment and usually change all the fuel filters.
Exactly Correct ! Double dosage with 5% to 10% Bio... Triple the dosage if 15% Bio and up..Winter Blend or not..
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Old 11-10-2019, 10:39 PM   #19
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Your fuel tank is on the "inside"?
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I have seen plenty of diesel trucks froze up on the side of the interstate. In a lot of cases, the fuel is so solidified that the truck has to be kept in a heated garage for a day or more to thaw out. Now a motorhome is not as susceptible as a truck to freezing as the fuel tank is internal whereas a truck has exposed fuel tank(s). But once the fuel has been saturated with cold, the result can be the same.
Personally, if you want to save the $10 and take a chance on a large tow & shop bill then I say go for it.
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:29 PM   #20
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For the past 19 years that we have had a diesel pusher, I have never used any additives in the diesel tank. I just run naked as far as the fuel goes. We take the coach to several snow ski areas several times a winter where temperatures have gotten down to -5 degrees F. I guess we have been lucky, because I've never experienced any problems with fuel. ... or maybe these additives are just advertising gimmicks to convincing people to buy something they don't need.
Im sure the frac companies wouldnt be losing 50,000$/hr over imaginary problems. Ive dealt with this myself, first hand, not somebody told me. These are massive headaches that ive had the unfortunate pleasure of dealing with. If youve got lows of -5 and highs maybe closer to 20 or 30 it wouldnt be a big problem. Whenever youre below 0 for a few days......good times.
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Old 11-11-2019, 08:46 AM   #21
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Been frozen up in a big truck a few times in the past. NOT fun. Anytime the temperatures will be consistently below 30 degrees, a bottle of fuel dope is cheap peace of mind.

(An RV fuel tank may be "enclosed" between the frame rails, but the bottom is still fully exposed to ambient temperature.)
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Old 11-11-2019, 12:26 PM   #22
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We have got caught more than one time over the past 60 or so years with gelling fuel. We would still have summer fuel in the bulk tanks and get an early cold snap like today and have experienced a tractor just simply slowing down and dying as the fuel gelled. Now a lot of vehicles have fuel heaters when the fuel makes the loop and if you have 1/4 tank or so then it stays heated however when you shut down you will gell big time.

Either get blended fuel or treat it
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Old 11-11-2019, 03:08 PM   #23
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Your fuel tank is on the "inside"?


Inside, as opposed to some class 8 and other trucks that have steel or aluminum tanks mounted outboard of the frame rails therefore much more exposed. And, next time you go past a refrigerated truck, note where the fuel tank is under the trailer.. hanging out exposed.
Motorhome tanks are tucked up and under mostly out of the worst exposure.
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Old 11-12-2019, 08:48 AM   #24
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When I was running big trucks for many years, the biggest problem was buying fuel in the South and then heading North. You used to see small grills and charcoal for sale at truck stops. This wasn't for cooking! Start the grill and wrap a tarp around the perimeter of the cab to block the wind and about 6 hours later, you'd be running again. The sweetest sound in the world was hearing that diesel come to life after nearly freezing to death in the middle of nowhere. Then you'd never forget to treat the fuel again.



In the old days, we'd put 10 gallons of kerosene in each 75 gallon tank of diesel, or a few gallons of regular gas before heading out across I80. But today's fragile diesels would not stand up to this.




Just last year my Ram 2500 started to jell one morning due to the arctic blast we had in Illinois. The fuel was treated by me and the fuel island but it was no match for 45-50 below zero weather. Luckily I was only a mile from home so I was able to limp home.
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:00 AM   #25
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When I was running big trucks for many years, the biggest problem was buying fuel in the South and then heading North. Just last year my Ram 2500 started to jell one morning due to the arctic blast we had in Illinois. The fuel was treated by me and the fuel island but it was no match for 45-50 below zero weather. Luckily I was only a mile from home so I was able to limp home.


In the old days, we'd put 10 gallons of kerosene in each 75 gallon tank of diesel, or a few gallons of regular gas before heading out across I80. But today's fragile diesels would not stand up to this.

Like Dave says, a big issue is where your fuel is from. Typically, in my area, the frozen trucks had just bought NJ fuel which was much cheaper at the time but untreated then started north into upstate NY for their delivery. Some didn’t have a good result.

My station sold diesel and only to commercial accounts. There were times when we blended 50% kerosene into the fuel. Most times tho, depending on the forecast, we’d blend 30% for temps from 10-20 degrees.
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:05 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave&ginny View Post
When I was running big trucks for many years, the biggest problem was buying fuel in the South and then heading North. You used to see small grills and charcoal for sale at truck stops. This wasn't for cooking! Start the grill and wrap a tarp around the perimeter of the cab to block the wind and about 6 hours later, you'd be running again. The sweetest sound in the world was hearing that diesel come to life after nearly freezing to death in the middle of nowhere. Then you'd never forget to treat the fuel again.



In the old days, we'd put 10 gallons of kerosene in each 75 gallon tank of diesel, or a few gallons of regular gas before heading out across I80. But today's fragile diesels would not stand up to this.




Just last year my Ram 2500 started to jell one morning due to the arctic blast we had in Illinois. The fuel was treated by me and the fuel island but it was no match for 45-50 below zero weather. Luckily I was only a mile from home so I was able to limp home.
That's old school! Made me chuckle, we used to put some gas in our trucks tanks back in the day too. But that was back when we hauled 100K with enough air in the tires so they didn't touch! Good times.
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:24 AM   #27
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Start the grill and wrap a tarp around the perimeter of the cab to block the wind and about 6 hours later, you'd be running again.

I actually saw a guy set his tractor on fire once like that....he had an old 238 Detroit. The typical oil on the engine pan caught fire and you could see the flames through his grille. He did manage to put it out. It wasn’t funny until a few hours later!!
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Old 11-12-2019, 08:39 PM   #28
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#1 diesel , or heating oil as it's called, doesn't need additives. In Alaska we would dump in a gallon of 30 weight oil to keep the injectors from wearing so much . The additives don't last the entire winter. I hit 6 degrees a few times last winter with no problems. About 3 months in we saw 9 degrees and the aquahot was billowing white smoke in the morning from lack of fuel. It warmed up later and all was well. I put in another bottle of treatment and it was fine through the rest of the winter.
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