Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-12-2012, 11:19 AM   #29
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinjoe View Post
Well its a hole new world with the diesel as far as you will need warm up and shut down time, bulding air pressure for brakes, suspension, air intake maintenence, brakes inspection, ect. My advice would be to find a dealer willing to take the time to go through all the things with you before taking off.

what brake inspections? what are you talking about. warm up and shut down is no different than a gasser in my opinion.U warm her up and u set it idle for a couple minutes before stopping
air cleaner system is monitored etc.I have owned and driven 40FT+ DP
and dont find any thing extraordinaryu at all.Never done or heard of this brake inspections?
__________________

__________________
Ticat900 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-12-2012, 04:20 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 626
Perhaps he was speaking of the procedure of pressing brake peddle repeatedly to deplete air pressure and noting time taken for air pressure to rebuild to ensure proper function of air system.
__________________

__________________
Bill Burgner, '05 Journey, 350 CAT
'05 Wrangler LJR, Blue Ox Aventa, Air Force One
www.retirement-ramblings.blogspot.com
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 04:39 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Sohapi's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: East of El Paso TX
Posts: 2,274
Larry and Rita, here is what I know about diesels............we have one and love it! We have a pick up for years and put over 350k miles on it. DH took care of the engine and yes the oil was more expensive, but we never spent much else on it and that was the same engine! So when DH wanted to buy a DP I was all for it.

We love our DP and have never looked back. It rides smooth, quiet and has lots of power to it.

What ever you buy I know you will love it!

Colleen
__________________
Colleen & Hunter
Ret. AF & RVM77
45' 2001 Monaco Signature
Sohapi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 04:52 PM   #32
Moderator Emeritus
 
RickO's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Litchfield Park, Arizona
Posts: 10,530
It's funny how, nowhere in the OP was the question asked about IF you should buy gas or diesel... or WHEN you should buy it. Yet, you've gotten all kinds of advice on both. Good thing you didn't ask if you should bring your Pit Bull or carry a gun.

I was one of those who jumped right in to going full time in a brand new 40DP... my first RV on any kind.

IMO, Formerboater offered a lot of good, practical advice for your situation.

*The warm up/cool down takes only a slight getting used to. Once your air pressure alarm goes off after a minute or two you can be on your way. Don't believe that the "cool down" is the same as a gasser. If you pull off the freeway and go right into a fuel station and turn it off without giving it at least a few minutes at something less that highway speeds you could be in for a very large repair bill. I don't believe it's true that diesels don't want to be turned off if you're only stopping for a short time so once I've been at or near idle for 3 minutes or so, I'll shut mine down.

*Maintenance. Maintenance. Maintenance. These are incredibly reliable machines but they need to be maintained. I use Freightliner Oasis shops to do my chassis maintenance. Once a year it's about $400 and every third year or so it's closer to $1100 to complete the spec'd maintenance.

*I don't think you'll find driving it terribly challenging. Quiet. Smooth. And, most of all, you have that wonderful engine brake which is like throwing out an anchor when going down hills. When climbing, learn to "drive the tach" and not the speedometer. Especially in warm weather, keep your RPM up (for my 400ISL it's around 2K) and select the appropriate gear to keep you there to avoid overheating.

I'm sure you'll love it and do just fine. Best of luck with your decision.

Rick
__________________
Rick, Nancy, Peanut & Lola our Westie Dogs & Bailey the Sheltie.

2007 Itasca Ellipse 40FD
RickO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 08:56 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
Country Coach Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redding
Posts: 3,412
There is a lot of diesel construction equipment and farm equipment that has performed reliably for years with less care and concern the DP owner has shown for his diesel engine.

Air Brake System: Pick up the Commercial Driver License test preparation document and read about the brake system. Pay special attention to the Pre Trip Test of the brake system. You will want to do it at least once per month. You can also find several iterations online with a quick search.

You will need to wait for the air pressure to be at least 90 pounds and preferably 120 lbs before driving the diesel.

You will want to allow the hot Turbo to cool down when coming off the highway speeds before shutting it down. A couple of minutes is all that is necessary and the approach to the fuel pumps is probably all that is needed.

Excessive warm up idling has no value. Once the air pressure is good, the engine is good to go.

Allow more time for acceleration manuevers. You will usually have a slow spool up of power.

Allow more following distance until you get the feel for air brake response.

The maintenance procedures are outlined in the manuals and help is here on the forum. But, it is still just draining the fluid, changing the filters, and lubing the zerks.

Do get your proposed purchase drive train and chassis inspected before you pay money for a used rig. The drive train and any water leaks in the house are the biggest exposure to repair costs.
__________________
Dean
1995 CC Magna #5280
C8.3L 300hp Cummins, 31,000lbs
deandec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 11:55 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
SeattlePirat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bainbridge Island, Wa
Posts: 453
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davinger View Post
The pros of diesel are plentiful. The fuel not only provides power but acts as a lubricant. A diesel engine last a great deal longer and provides more power especially when climbing hills. Your diesel offers more torque than most gas engines and will allow for greater distances between maintenance in most cases. There are so many pros I could go at length. As to the cons I will touch on the most common and the biggest reasons people aren't getting diesel engines.

1) As of 2007 the government required that diesel fuel contain less sulfur. The end result was that the engine produced less emissions but the down side is that there was a loss of fuel economy.

2) as a result of number 1 the price of diesel went from the cheapest fuel (cheaper than regular) to the most expensive (average .10 cents more than premium.)

3) Diesel engines produce a great deal of compression which means they need more oil and not just any oil but expensive oil. If you take your engine to get the oil changed it can easily go over 100.00 for an oil change. My 2010 F-250 takes 24 quarts of Rotella oil or I void my warranty.

4) repairs are costly and in many cases more time consuming for diesel engines.

5) On an RV if you get a diesel engine you will also have a diesel generator which means you have 2 diesel engines on your coach.

6) If you live in one of the colder climates you will have to have at least 1 if not 2 block heaters. That means you will plug your engine in to the wall socket. This isn't to charge the minimum of 2 batteries dedicated to starting your engine but to keep it warm enough to start. You also will have to pay attention to the glow plugs indicator on your dashboard. Turn your key to the on position but not to start it. You will see (in most cases) a yellow light that indicates that the glow plugs are heating up your cylinders. Once this light goes out you can start your engine.

I am not trying to discourage you from getting perhaps the most reliable engine on the road. In fact I am in the process of getting my wife a new car next week that has a diesel engine in it. I just like people to know what they are getting before they jump in.
The reason diesel fuel costs more than gas is simple, the oil barons export diesel fuel to Europe in exchange for gas and the high price is the artificially created shortages, caused by the export. The oil companies know how to create legal monopolies and they have.

The other reason is that we used to have a gas coach and bought a new diesel one in 2004, the rest is history.
__________________
SeattlePirat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:15 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinjoe View Post
Well its a hole new world with the diesel as far as you will need warm up and shut down time, bulding air pressure for brakes, suspension, air intake maintenence, brakes inspection, ect. My advice would be to find a dealer willing to take the time to go through all the things with you before taking off.
No need for warm up time. Just build air pressure to release the brakes fill the suspension, then don't use full throttle till the temp come up to normal.
You don't need to idle for much more than getting off an off ramp unless you just climbed the Grapevine or other hard pull.
If I'd have known you were looking to go to a DP I'd have gone over it with you at the Meet & Greet.
You can always call me too.
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:21 AM   #36
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by buki View Post
And never forget that as long as there a restaraunt nearby with a grease pit, you will never run out of fuel. And the best part is that it is usually free.
If you do that you'll be sitting alongside the road waiting for a tow and an expensive bill to drain the tank, replace the filter and possibly injectors and pump.
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:27 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davinger View Post
3) Diesel engines produce a great deal of compression which means they need more oil and not just any oil but expensive oil. If you take your engine to get the oil changed it can easily go over 100.00 for an oil change. My 2010 F-250 takes 24 quarts of Rotella oil or I void my warranty.
As long as the oil you use meets or exceeds Fords specs they can't void you warranty for using some other brand. Check out the Moss-Magnusson Act.
__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 09:51 AM   #38
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickO View Post
It's funny how, nowhere in the OP was the question asked about IF you should buy gas or diesel... or WHEN you should buy it. Yet, you've gotten all kinds of advice on both. Good thing you didn't ask if you should bring your Pit Bull or carry a gun.

I was one of those who jumped right in to going full time in a brand new 40DP... my first RV on any kind.

IMO, Formerboater offered a lot of good, practical advice for your situation.

*The warm up/cool down takes only a slight getting used to. Once your air pressure alarm goes off after a minute or two you can be on your way. Don't believe that the "cool down" is the same as a gasser. If you pull off the freeway and go right into a fuel station and turn it off without giving it at least a few minutes at something less that highway speeds you could be in for a very large repair bill. I don't believe it's true that diesels don't want to be turned off if you're only stopping for a short time so once I've been at or near idle for 3 minutes or so, I'll shut mine down.

*Maintenance. Maintenance. Maintenance. These are incredibly reliable machines but they need to be maintained. I use Freightliner Oasis shops to do my chassis maintenance. Once a year it's about $400 and every third year or so it's closer to $1100 to complete the spec'd maintenance.

*I don't think you'll find driving it terribly challenging. Quiet. Smooth. And, most of all, you have that wonderful engine brake which is like throwing out an anchor when going down hills. When climbing, learn to "drive the tach" and not the speedometer. Especially in warm weather, keep your RPM up (for my 400ISL it's around 2K) and select the appropriate gear to keep you there to avoid overheating.

I'm sure you'll love it and do just fine. Best of luck with your decision.

Rick
Very few DP have engine brake.Most have a exhaust brake which is no where near as effective as a engine brake.I only go 4000 miles a year so
my costs are very low.oil is good for 4 years plus.Syn in trans is good for 300K so will never change it.may be the filters in it once.I grease the chassis once a year.I find by the time I slow down and reach the fuel pump the engine is more than safe to shut down.The only time your air brake alarm should sound is after sitting for a week or 2 not everytime you start it when cold.If it goes off after one day u have seriuos air leak
One "BIG"thing about a 40Ft+ MH is U really need to judge your lead time pulling off side street onto main road traffic and really need to learn the increased turning radious required otherwise you will be running over curbs and sidewalks and lawns etc
__________________
Ticat900 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 10:49 AM   #39
Moderator Emeritus
 
RickO's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Litchfield Park, Arizona
Posts: 10,530
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ticat900 View Post
Very few DP have engine brake.Most have a exhaust brake which is no where near as effective as a engine brake.I only go 4000 miles a year so
my costs are very low.oil is good for 4 years plus.
I didn't realize that very few DPs today have engine brakes. I guess I'm one of the lucky ones.

What type of engine do you have that allows four years between oil changes?

Rick
__________________
Rick, Nancy, Peanut & Lola our Westie Dogs & Bailey the Sheltie.

2007 Itasca Ellipse 40FD
RickO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:23 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,893
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickO View Post
I didn't realize that very few DPs today have engine brakes. I guess I'm one of the lucky ones.

What type of engine do you have that allows four years between oil changes?

Rick
If you have the Cummins you have an engine brake (lucky you) but the standard was the Cat with exhaust brake.
__________________
Terry & Alice
2006 Bounder 38L DP
2012 GMC Terrain
firedoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:49 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
rssnape's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 330
Diesel is better.

Torque is a measure of work. Diesels typically put out much more torque than their gas counterparts. Diesels also do it at a much lower RPM like 1900 vs Gas engines top torque is around 3600-4000. Most folks couldn't stand to listen to their gas engine above 4000 for a multi mile climb over a mountain pass. Okay so diesel gives you more power at lower RPM and usually better fuel economy.
My First and only DP was 14 yrs old and we went on a trip with a buddy Who had a new 2010 V10. I got about 1 MPG better than him, and his rig was smaller overall. At around 10 MPG that basically covers the difference in fuel price and you have more power to boot.
__________________
rssnape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 03:02 PM   #42
Senior Member
 
Mr_D's Avatar
 
Solo Rvers Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 28,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by firedoc View Post
If you have the Cummins you have an engine brake (lucky you) but the standard was the Cat with exhaust brake.
Not true, you don't get an engine brake in a Cummins till you get to the ISL level, the ISB and ISC have exhaust brakes although the replacement for the ISB uses a variable vane turbo.
__________________

__________________
2009 45' Magna 630 w/Cummins ISX 650 HP/1950 Lbs Ft
Charter Good Sam Lifetime Member, FMCA, SKP
RV'ing since 1957, NRA Benefactor Life, towing '14 CR-V
Mr_D is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diesel



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.