Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-11-2013, 06:11 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
National RV Owners Club
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 616
DP Air Pressure Alarm

On my 2001 Marlin DP, is there any way to reduce or eliminate the shrill alarm for the air pressure alarm to reach it's normal operating pressure? The sound drives one of my dogs crazy and it scares the sxxt out of her. She hates to come in the coach because she is afraid of the sound. I can take it but she can't. I have to leave her out of the coach for the minute or two for it to stop (from a cold start up). Even from a warm start up, the momentary shrill sounds freak her out. Very inconvenient.

The gauges have warning lights that don't go off until pressure is reached and I am fully aware that I cannot move the coach until the pressure is adequate. So turning off (disconnecting) the audio alarm is not a safety issue for me.

Thanks,

John
__________________

__________________
John & Deanie, Corky and Benji (best buddies)
2001 National Marlin 390 DP
"Try to live up to your dog's opinion of you."
zzjea is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-11-2013, 07:19 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
chawkins99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Calera, AL
Posts: 466
I agree it is annoying when airing up before moving off but it's primary function is if air pressure drops while in motion. You NEED to know immediately if you have an air pressure problem.
Disabling it IS a safety issue for that reason.
__________________

__________________
Chris, Jo & Dell (Siberian Husky - 110lb of fur and muscle)
2003 Beaver Santiam 40DST - Cummins 330ISC
Closely followed by a 2012 Equinox AWD
chawkins99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 07:36 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
ronspradley's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 1,627
I installed a momentary switch in line with the low air alarm. I put it on the dash. Now, when I get ready to start MH, I press switch, hold until air pressure builds, then release switch. No irritating alarm. And no safety issue, because this is a momentary switch that only kills the alarm when I am pressing the button. Hope this helps.

ronspradley
__________________
1993 Gulfstream Sun Voyager DP 30'
200 HP Cummins B5.9, 4sp Allison AT542
Toad 1998 Honda CRV, 2006 Honda CRV
Life's too short to drink cheap beer.
ronspradley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 09:02 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Craig_R's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Huson, MT
Posts: 1,043
Quote:
Originally Posted by chawkins99 View Post
I agree it is annoying when airing up before moving off but it's primary function is if air pressure drops while in motion. You NEED to know immediately if you have an air pressure problem.
Disabling it IS a safety issue for that reason.
Just to add a little to what Chris said. When your air pressure drops below 60-70 psi your low air warning device(s) will be activated. The idea is to give you time to react and get stopped safely before the air pressure drops below 30-35 pounds when the Spring (Parking/Emergency) Brakes will be automatically applied.

FWIW, If you are losing that much air pressure overnight that indicates that you have an air leak. I think I'd be more concerned about getting the air leak repaired than disconnecting the audible low air warning device. You shouldn't be losing that much air overnight. Maybe over the course of sitting for a week or two, but not over night.
__________________
Craig & Donna
2005 Beaver Monterey Laguna IV (aka The Hotel Monterey)
2011 Jeep Liberty Limited
Craig_R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 09:22 AM   #5
RV Mutant #14
 
Wayne M's Avatar


 
Winnebago Owners Club
Texas Boomers Club
Freightliner Owners Club
iRV2 No Limits Club
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,201
I'd look into A Timer
__________________
Wayne MSGT USMC (Ret) & Earlene (CinCHouse)
2015 Winnebago Tour 42QD
RVM14
It is what it is, and then it is what you make of it.
Wayne M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 11:12 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
chawkins99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Calera, AL
Posts: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig_R View Post
Just to add a little to what Chris said. When your air pressure drops below 60-70 psi your low air warning device(s) will be activated. The idea is to give you time to react and get stopped safely before the air pressure drops below 30-35 pounds when the Spring (Parking/Emergency) Brakes will be automatically applied.

FWIW, If you are losing that much air pressure overnight that indicates that you have an air leak. I think I'd be more concerned about getting the air leak repaired than disconnecting the audible low air warning device. You shouldn't be losing that much air overnight. Maybe over the course of sitting for a week or two, but not over night.
Craig. I don't think a leak is the problem. Probably dumped air prior to leveling...
__________________
Chris, Jo & Dell (Siberian Husky - 110lb of fur and muscle)
2003 Beaver Santiam 40DST - Cummins 330ISC
Closely followed by a 2012 Equinox AWD
chawkins99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 11:17 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 455
Quote:
Originally Posted by chawkins99 View Post
Craig. I don't think a leak is the problem. Probably dumped air prior to leveling...
Are there motorhomes out there that use the same tank for brakes as for the airbags?????????
__________________
Stik
Full Timing since 2005
09 Journey 34Y, 2015 Grand Cherokee Toad
stik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 12:02 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 588
Quote:
Originally Posted by stik View Post
Are there motorhomes out there that use the same tank for brakes as for the airbags?????????
Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think most motor homes do.

We have a Tiffin Phaeton on Freightliner XC chassis (very common) and I think there's just two 2 tanks (primary and secondary) + wet tank and I think front brakes are on one tank, rears are on the other and the airbags share one of the tanks with the brakes.

Back to the OPs original question, as others mentioned, the alarm is a safety feature which you should be checking before each trip but I suppose a temporary manual disable like ronspradley proposed isn't a terrible idea (as long as you can still confirm the alarm is working and where it stops). In Ontario at least, it's illegal to drive a vehicle with air brakes with non-functional low pressure alarm so you need to know it works before you drive.
__________________
michelb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 12:19 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Steve Ownby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cosby, Tn
Posts: 6,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by michelb View Post

Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think most motor homes do.

We have a Tiffin Phaeton on Freightliner XC chassis (very common) and I think there's just two 2 tanks (primary and secondary) + wet tank and I think front brakes are on one tank, rears are on the other and the airbags share one of the tanks with the brakes.

Back to the OPs original question, as others mentioned, the alarm is a safety feature which you should be checking before each trip but I suppose a temporary manual disable like ronspradley proposed isn't a terrible idea (as long as you can still confirm the alarm is working and where it stops). In Ontario at least, it's illegal to drive a vehicle with air brakes with non-functional low pressure alarm so you need to know it works before you drive.
Yes, you are correct. There is just one air system on coaches and both the brakes and air bags are fed from the same tanks. Some coaches have "ping" tanks between the main air tanks and the air bags but its still just one system. There are check valves at critical parts of the system to prevent a catastrophic lost of pressure in the suspension system from pulling air from the brakes but the air available for the brakes would quickly be depleted and the rear park brake would be applied when a critical level was reached in the brake system.
__________________
Steve Ownby
Full time since 2007
2003 Monaco Signature
Steve Ownby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 12:23 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
chawkins99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Calera, AL
Posts: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by michelb View Post
Please correct me if I'm wrong but I think most motor homes do.

We have a Tiffin Phaeton on Freightliner XC chassis (very common) and I think there's just two 2 tanks (primary and secondary) + wet tank and I think front brakes are on one tank, rears are on the other and the airbags share one of the tanks with the brakes.

Back to the OPs original question, as others mentioned, the alarm is a safety feature which you should be checking before each trip but I suppose a temporary manual disable like ronspradley proposed isn't a terrible idea (as long as you can still confirm the alarm is working and where it stops). In Ontario at least, it's illegal to drive a vehicle with air brakes with non-functional low pressure alarm so you need to know it works before you drive.
Yep. Mine is on a Roadmaster chassis. Same setup. Two tanks, one front, one back, shared between brakes and airbags. I know there are non-return valves so if I deplete air by stomping on the brakes repeatedly, the airbags don't deflate. Have to use the air dump switch.

It would be nice if the alarm were tied into the transmission so it is silenced when in neutral.
__________________
Chris, Jo & Dell (Siberian Husky - 110lb of fur and muscle)
2003 Beaver Santiam 40DST - Cummins 330ISC
Closely followed by a 2012 Equinox AWD
chawkins99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 12:26 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
FlyingDiver's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Somewhere....
Posts: 3,820
On my Spartan K3 chassis, you can silence the low air alarm by pushing one of the buttons on the LCD display. At least while it's in neutral. The alarm I can't silence is "Jacks Down", which is really annoying. And it's why I pull in the slides and raise the jacks before I start the engine.
__________________
2008 King Aire 4562, Spartan K3(GT) w/ Cummins ISX 600
2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 5.7L V8 Hemi w/ Blue Ox Aventa LX Tow Bar and baseplate, SMI Air Force One brake
FlyingDiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 08:59 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
National RV Owners Club
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 616
All I want to accomplish is to change the shrill alarm to something less deafening and not so loud. Even muffling it would be better. What does it look like?

Also, I don't seem to have an air dump option. Do I have a small leak if the pressure doesn't hold ~100 psi overnight? If so, where do I begin to find it?

John
__________________
John & Deanie, Corky and Benji (best buddies)
2001 National Marlin 390 DP
"Try to live up to your dog's opinion of you."
zzjea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 04:00 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
ronspradley's Avatar


 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 1,627
[QUOTE=zzjea;1528252]All I want to accomplish is to change the shrill alarm to something less deafening and not so loud. Even muffling it would be better. What does it look like?

Do not know what yours looks like. I just followed the sound.


ronspradley
__________________
1993 Gulfstream Sun Voyager DP 30'
200 HP Cummins B5.9, 4sp Allison AT542
Toad 1998 Honda CRV, 2006 Honda CRV
Life's too short to drink cheap beer.
ronspradley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 09:46 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
chawkins99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Calera, AL
Posts: 466
This prompted me to do some research...

There is a "neutral indicator" circuit coming out of the Allison TCM which could (in theory) be hooked to a N/C relay in the alarm circuit to silence the alarm while in neutral.

This output is designed primarily for industrial machinery with a PTO (Power Take Off) option but should work.

May investigate next time I have some spare time.
__________________

__________________
Chris, Jo & Dell (Siberian Husky - 110lb of fur and muscle)
2003 Beaver Santiam 40DST - Cummins 330ISC
Closely followed by a 2012 Equinox AWD
chawkins99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.