Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-23-2017, 05:50 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 21
Driveability Class A

first, I would like to think all the folks that have helped on previous questions. my question today relates to class A drivability. After months of searching for a RV that I wanted, the DW and I test drove a Georgie Boy 2450ds today. We liked the unit, but during driving, the RV seemed to wander, and I was always correcting the steering to stay within the lane. we were traveling at 55 to 60 miles an hour on a flat stretch of highway in Florida. there was some wind but not enough that should effect the driving that much. what if a large trunk was passing on the interstate. the front end just seem to float, without any feel for the road. Is this normal for a class A? I would think not. I've driven 24 and 26 foot U-Haul trucks and didn't have this problem. if this isn't normal, what things can be done to correct the wandering?
__________________

__________________
carolinablue is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-23-2017, 07:17 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
c92vette's Avatar
 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 312
What you are experiencing is normal for a gas Class A. Are you on a Workhorse or Ford chassis? Either way there are is plethora of fixes for comfort of driving the coach. One thing though, the motorhome is way different than a U-haul box truck as surface area and loading are totally different. You can't change the surface area of your coach but you can load it properly to allow it to handle better. That's the number one thing most new to a Class A fail to realize.

Everything you carry has weight and loading it for convenience, as in everything in the upper cabinets, will cause it to be top heavy. This is detrimental to handling as winds and passing semi's can and will push you around. I load low, carry full water, and put most everything heavy in the basement or as low as I can get it. Also I did the Cheap Handling Fix (CHF) on my Ford F-53 chassis. It made a world of difference. Search it on this forum if you are on the F-53 chassis. I also went to the truck stop and weighed the coach with a standard load for us on board including full water and fuel. Then I readjusted the load to get it spread over the axles better. Following that I installed top of the line tires, Toyos, and inflated them high (100psi) and then by trial and error I found the best pressure for travelling (I settled on 5 psi over data plate pressure or 90 psi).

This doesn't mean that following what I did will make your coach handle like a Corvette because it won't. But, there are other things you can add to the chassis to improve the ride. Upgrade the shocks, add a steering stabilizer, additional or larger sway bars, air bags, or Sumo springs are a few of the additions for the chassis. One thing is to start by loading properly on decent tires (Toyo's or Michelins IMO) and experiment with inflation pressures. So if you are just looking understand the dealer will not have the coach loaded well so expect the wandering and push during the test drive. Ask what chassis mods have been do to the coach so you know what to expect.

Finally, be sure the coach you plan to buy has tires that are less than 5 years old no matter the tread depth. Look at the DOT date on each tire. Search this forum on how to do this if you don't know how. The tires need to be within this date range as coach tires last between 5 and 7 years safely. That's the time frame most of us replace tires whether the look worn or not.
__________________

__________________
Steve n' Tammy with Ella Mae the "Shippet" in a 2003 Fleetwood Bounder 32' on a Ford F53 Chassis and a V-10 gasser pulling a 2013 Ford Edge on a EZE Tow Dolly
c92vette is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2017, 07:26 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Notyourbusiness
Posts: 536
One thing I've learned is not to over control the steering. When I first started driving motorhomes I found some of the wandering was caused by me over correcting. Now I give small inputs and the wandering is gone. Keeping in mind these are new units that are empty.
__________________
V3600 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2017, 07:39 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Dcbenny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: New Smyrna Beach Fl
Posts: 160
The biggest fix to my wandering was getting wheel alignment when I first got MH I couldn't drive over 50 it was all over the road and trucks just pushed me off the highway. After the wheel alignment i could drive 65 -70 with not much effort. The next thing was CHF not much different with handling but big improvement with MH rocking and rolling especially around curves. Also have Roadmaster steering stabilizer now I drive comfortably between 60 and 65 with no issue, can even drive with one hand
__________________
Don & Liz B. w/ Pink Retired Greyhound
Thor Motor Coach
2015 Windsport 27K
Dcbenny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2017, 07:49 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
windsorbill's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Palm Desert, CA
Posts: 1,236
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinablue View Post
first, I would like to think all the folks that have helped on previous questions. my question today relates to class A drivability. After months of searching for a RV that I wanted, the DW and I test drove a Georgie Boy 2450ds today. We liked the unit, but during driving, the RV seemed to wander, and I was always correcting the steering to stay within the lane. we were traveling at 55 to 60 miles an hour on a flat stretch of highway in Florida. there was some wind but not enough that should effect the driving that much. what if a large trunk was passing on the interstate. the front end just seem to float, without any feel for the road. Is this normal for a class A? I would think not. I've driven 24 and 26 foot U-Haul trucks and didn't have this problem. if this isn't normal, what things can be done to correct the wandering?
Is this a new coach and you test drove from a dealer or a used coach?
__________________
Bill & Brigitte
06 Windsor PRQ, Cummins 400 ISL
2014 Honda CRV
windsorbill is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 01:20 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 20
I have exactly the same rig. Can't be any newer than 2006, that was the last year made, and the year I have. For Ford chassis, they say the CHF (cheap handling fix) helps. Well, that is a panhard rod, usually on the rear axle, and you definitely can use one to help minimize the side wake when a big rig goes past. My 2450 came with this already installed, and it helps immensely; I hardly notice big rigs passing me, and even the wind has to be very strong before I start to notice it. The panhard rod I have is blue, so it probably came from Henderson Super Steer in Oregon. Ultra RV has one as well:
https://www.ultrarvproducts.com/Ultr...et-P32-Chassis

Then, for the constant steering correction, consider getting updated bell cranks:
https://www.ultrarvproducts.com/Work...sis?filter=209

Seems Chevy went cheap on the bell cranks, using simple sleeve bushings for the shafts, and that means you can NEVER take out some of the slop in the bell crank. Workhorse (which is the manufacturer of this P32 chassis) didn't bother to install a better design on the bell cranks. But the ones that Ultra RV has for sale use real bearings that stop the slop.

Also, if you replace the bell cranks, then you'll likely need at least the driver side bell crank arm:
https://www.ultrarvproducts.com/Work...93)?filter=209

check the VIN to get the right versions. There are other sellers of these pieces, but UltarRV's price includes free shipping, which others charge shipping separately. Still, there are some better prices you may find. Shoot me a pm to have me send you some of the other vendors. The people at Ultra RV are a pleasure to talk to, and the owner answered one of my calls, and I was impressed with his honesty and knowledge.

Adding the front steering parts, and the rear panhard rod should transform the rig. I have not yet done the steering, that is next on my list, but big semi's passing me simply don't bother me even as much as they would passing my passenger car. I originally had more road wander than I do now, but front tires were worn, so put new tires on the front, and that solved half of my front end wander right there. I plan on putting on the steering parts and getting it aligned before next spring, and then I should have solved the vast majority, if not all, of my now reduced wander problem.

The house itself is well made, the only problem I had was of my own making. Tried to replace one of the interior lights with an LED light, and mistakenly pulled the wire out of a connector behind the wall. Had to do a work around.

Some people on irv2 say stay away from Workhorse, but there are a number of very knowledgable people on the Workhorse forum, and there are still dealers that know exactly what to do with these rigs. You won't catch me saying to avoid the 2450DS, my wife and I really enjoy it.
__________________
2006 Georgie Boy Landau 2450DS
P32 Workhorse Chassis
NW_Al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 07:41 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Selah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Indiana
Posts: 2,315
What you are experiencing is somewhat normal for a gas rig. One of the ways to minimize the constant corrections is to not drive it like a car. You drive a car, you aim a MH. Basically you look much murther down the road and aim the coach towards a point.
There are other things you can do to a gas coach to help. Steering stabilizers, rear track bars, etc..
__________________
Paul, Kathy, and Tux the Mini Schnauzer
2014 Tiffin Phaeton 42 LH, 2013 Honda CRV
"When the time comes to look back, make sure you'll like what you see"
Selah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 08:32 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,660
Ok RV's have 3 shortcomings in their design, at least many do.. Mine only had 2.

First we have SWAY, side to side rocking, like fans at a rock concert holding their BICS.. SWAY bars are standard on all vehicles. but the ones they put on the chassis used for an RV (They are a chassis part) are often a bit..er.. anemic.. replacing with a better SWAY bar will improve this.. Workhorse put a darn good one on my chassis since it was BUILT for RV from the drawing board up.. That is the one I don't have.

2nd: Leaf spring suspension (Common on large vehicles to this day) not only allows the axle to move up and down a bit to absorb bumps and dips in the road. but it allows it to move SIDEWAYS.. This causes your RV to "WAG" king of like qa dog's tail. If the front moves to the right while the rear movces to the left.. You think you are moving right and turn left to compensate.. Then they swap. Now you think you are mocing to the left (You actually are since you compensated) and turn right. the result is you go down the road liek this /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\

A TRACK BAR (Also called a pan hard bar) Is standard with STRUT suspension and not needed with "independent" suspension (THe real reason why they started using it on pickpus back in the 60's) It can be added to an RV.. Ford and Workhorse rear end I'd suggest an ULTRA POWER

I have a Davis (Being as that's my name ) on the front.

This locks the axle in place side to side and I mean LOCKS, If you put one on each end you stop it 100%.. I found just one is often enough.


The third improvement is a steering stablizer. tHis tries to keep you on the "Straight and narrow" as well as can assist in maintaini9ng control should a tire blow (By the way watch the "Watching these videos may save your life" Video.. It was produced by Mitchlen in association with an Insurance company and I've met the featured Driver)

Mine is a Blue Ox Tru-Center At the time I bought it it had one feature that was unique (Remote adjustment.. I can re-center FROM the driver's seat no need to use tools) Safe-T-Steer now offers that too I believe.

I'd start with the track bar and stablizer. add sway if needed.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 08:45 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Metamora, MI
Posts: 131
"For Ford chassis, they say the CHF (cheap handling fix) helps. Well, that is a panhard rod, usually on the rear axle, and you definitely can use one to help minimize the side wake when a big rig goes past. "

The CHF thread talks about changing the location point of the links on the SWAY bar, not the "panhard / track bar". Two different things. To summarize thousands of posts in that thread (wow), Most F53's have sway bars that have two holes for the sway bar link. Standard Ford uses the outermost. Moving the link to the innermost adds more tension on sway on the bar. This reduces the sway of the top of the coach. Depending on coach, you may have to lengthen the links to keep the geometry correct.

There are also lots of threads about building track bars for the rear. This device locates the axle side by side relative to the chassis frame.

Since the CHF can be free (just labor), try that first.
__________________
2000 Bounder 36S w/ Ford F53 V10
2002 Newmar Mountain Aire Limited 4370 w/ Spartan K2 and Cummins 500hp
Dav L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 08:54 AM   #10
Ex Millwright / Army Vet
 
marjoa's Avatar


 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Livingston, TX
Posts: 1,325
Well, just the fact that this rig is only about 25' long is a big part of the problem. It's tall and has a short wheel base so it doesn't take much too push it around and not stay on track. I've read a lot of small rigs like this handle this way.

Also don't know the condition of the tires, suspension components or whether your front end is aligned correctly or not. This rig is probably at least 10-12 yrs. old too. But with that being said...

A rear track bar and a Safe-T-Plus in the front would certainly help. (about 1K self installed for both) Some say the CHF also helps.(Free) Not sure of the condition of the shocks but if they're stock, I'd replace those too with Koni's. ($650 or so) It will help in the ride, reduce rolling and porpoising.

If you have enough extra CCC, I've read where some here carry more water in their holding tank and it seems to settle down the rear end some. I personally don't like that option. More weight, less MPH, adds to GVWR and lowers CCC. Plus, if the water tank is only say 1/2 or 3/4 full, that water—sloshing back & forth—in the tank can actually cause more rear end instability.

Good luck my friend.
__________________
TEAM Martin & Joanie...and Wookie (our wonderful Yorkie)
2012 WGO Vista 35F, 5 ST, Toyo M122's/duallys, Centramatics (all around), TPMS, ScanGuage II, Safe T Plus, SS Rear Trac Bar, Koni FSD's, BG Fluids, Toad 2017 FORD Fiesta, Escapees
Making Traveling, FTing and Our Motorhome "GREAT AGAIN".
marjoa is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 09:20 AM   #11
Senior Member - DIYer
 
Waiter21's Avatar


 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 3,224
Three items will significantly improve the handling. Especially if its an older F53 chassis. These are easy to inspect during a pre-purchase to see if they've been complied with. These three items are easily doable by any DIYer.

1) Front Wheel Alignment. Check and adjust, Consider setting it at a very slight toe-in. If its straight or toe-out this aggravates the wandering.

F53 chassis front end toe-in adjustment – 1999 Southwind 35S


2) Cheap Handling Fix (CHF)
Adjust the torsion bar links to firm up the side to side sway. When you do this, consider making the links two or three inches longer. This improves the geometry of the sway bar movement..

CHF – Cheap Handling Fix – Fix for sway and handling – 1999 Southwind 35S


3) Shock Absorbers
- If you're 10-15 years old, the shocks may be worn. Replace all four with standard ole Monroe's. This will help dampen side to side motion

Replace Shock Absorbers – 1999 Southwind 35S
__________________
1999 Fleetwood Southwind 35S (Ford F53 6.8L V10) - Toad 2003 Saturn Vue.
It won't do MACH 2, but I can get a sandwich and take a pee.
Waiter21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 09:49 AM   #12
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Nashville, TN area
Posts: 703
CHF resolves 90 percent of body roll issues. Search this site for lots of reading on the subject.
__________________
hohenwald48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 12:52 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 20
This is a Workhorse chassis, as I noted earlier. Not made anymore, and Ford chassis is the only GAS option currently available today, to my knowledge, unfortunately for competition. CHF was my example, and a bad one, only to show that each chassis has its own problems and solutions. The Workhorse P32 chassis has independent front suspension, and there is NO adjustment in the sway bar, so that idea is not useable for this rig.

The height of the rig can make it susceptible to wind, but the rear track bar seems to help solve that easily. As for the length of the rig, there are lots of posts about the ratio of the chassis wheelbase to overall length. Put it succinctly, that means if you have a lot of overhand behind the rear axle, the wind will likely cause tail wagging. The 2450 DS has a decent ratio, and the area of bodywork behind the rear axle is small, in comparison to the overall length. As I said, I don't have problems with the wind unless it is gusting heavily (say 30 mph or more) and passing semi's just don't cause me much problem at all. I attribute that to the rear panhard bar (yes, aka track bar, but panhard bar is the original name AFAIK.)

GMC should have done this originally, but the chassis was also used for step vans, which seldom got out of the city. When they started selling the chassis for motorhomes, GM went cheap and didn't add this suspension component that really helps. But each chassis manufacturer has its strong points, and its weaknesses.

Agree that alignment can definitely help, which is why I plan to do that soon. Original shocks are Bilstein, and they could be getting worn now, depending on mileage. Mine seem fine at 37,000 miles.

Right now, as I stated earlier, my main chassis concern is the steering linkage. I also want to install heavier springs for the front axle, GM/Workhorse used airbags inside the springs to let them use the same springs for various chassis weights. If the rig seems to be sitting nose down, that probably means the airbags are not inflated enough or are torn, or it might be time to upgrade the springs.

For OP, I think my suggestions will solve almost all, if not all of his problems for this particular rig.
__________________
2006 Georgie Boy Landau 2450DS
P32 Workhorse Chassis
NW_Al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 09:31 AM   #14
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 21
Thanks NW AL for all the info. The DW and I like the layout, length, and leveling jacks on the 2450DS. Been looking at A, B, & C's for 10 months trying to find what we want. We need the room of a slide out in the living area because of our lab-a-doodle. Just returned from Florida. Dealer said he had a 2002 Suite in EXCELLENT condition on the exterior and just need some clean up on the interior. What a joke that turn out to be. The seal on both slides were dry rotted, split, and falling off, the carpet was shot and some of the cabinet doors needed reworked, the front drivers seat arm rest was broke, and missing trim. If you come across any more 2450's or something similar shoot me the info.
__________________

__________________
carolinablue is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
class a



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Winnebago Aspect/Cambria model comparisons/driveability 2wiresdave Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 3 02-02-2017 08:48 PM
Driveability of 19.5 vs 22.5 mikelm48 Ford Motorhome Chassis Forum 18 11-05-2016 10:20 AM
Driveability and Handling 45' with Tag az99 Class A Motorhome Discussions 15 05-25-2016 12:44 PM
Driveability of Class A Tony0092 Class A Motorhome Discussions 21 07-17-2015 11:14 PM
Class A, class B, class C?? dottedlines MH-General Discussions & Problems 22 03-24-2015 10:55 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.