Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-23-2013, 05:28 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 54
Driving class A in snow

We have a 2009 Itasca 35J that we would like to get on the road for spring break. The weather in Colordo is pretty bad until Tuesday, and that would not give us enought time for the trip to Flagstaff/Phoenix areas. I live in Colorado Springs, and store our RV in Pueblo. I would like to drive to Pueblo (60 miles) and bring the RV home to un-winterize, load, and get on the road tomorrow. Quite a bit on snow on the roads today, and wondering if I would be crazy to try to pick it up and get on the road. How does a 35 foot RV do in snow? How would driving Raton Pass be if snowy? I have no problem driving my 4 wheel drive Pathfinder, and did drive from Boulder last night. We also live on a pretty steep (sledding hill grade) road, so how does an RV do getting going from stopped on dry snow pack? Thanks for any input
__________________

__________________
Cspringsrv is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 03-23-2013, 05:35 PM   #2
Community Administrator
 
Clifftall's Avatar


 
Fleetwood Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 29,123
I certainly wouldn't drive it , but I live in Fl. I would be concerned if the roads were salted as that does havoc to the chassis if not throughly washed off right away. So they tell me.
Congrats on your first post. Hopefully you'll post more often and let us know how you make out on your trip.
__________________

__________________


Cliff,Tallulah and Buddy ( 1999-2012 )
Clifftall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 05:44 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Coaster1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 371
Most any vehicle is pretty much OK in slush or snow with the correct tires.. It is the ice, black or seen that will give you fits and increase your pucker power. Seems like if you have no or limited experience with your rig, the "sledding hill" is not the place to improve your skills.

I'll share this at the risk of being laughed at: All of my experience on ice and snow has been gained thru either starting out in the first place or being caught with no place to safely stop and forced to go on. Sadly, as both a former over the road truck driver and long time RVer, I have a lot.

My advice, if your not comfortable, don't go.
__________________
'92 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager. Tweaked 5.9 Cummins, complete interior makeover (previous owner).
Coaster1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 05:53 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
no3putt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Pueblo, CO
Posts: 516
Drove up I-25 in January in snow up to Pueblo and not much fun, went about 30 mph and the wind was blowing too. If we didn't have to get home would of stayed down south longer for good roads.
__________________
no3putt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 05:54 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
glarnold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Bellevue, Nebraska
Posts: 436
You expressed some concern about getting going from stopped. I would also be concerned about getting stopped from going.

If it were me, I would not put life or RV at risk.

Just my opinion.

GL Arnold
__________________
2004 Damon Daybreak
Former Full-Timers
glarnold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 05:55 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 54
I actually feel pretty comfortable driving a bad weather/roads, but do not have chains if needed. Bought our RV last spring break and put about 8K miles on it last year. I have been reading the forums for a while, but have not needed to post until today. Thanks for the help
__________________
Cspringsrv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:04 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
woodburner's Avatar
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Pond Piggies Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Mentor Ohio
Posts: 875
Feeling comfortable driving a car or 4 wheel drive SUV is one thing; the dynamics change considerably when the vehicle is a 35ft. sail that is not meant for driving in the snow.
I sure wouldn't do it.

__________________

2012 Tiffin Allegro 34TGA
2013 Jeep Wrangler Sport
woodburner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:05 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 19
I drove my 36 Dp in about 4" of drifting and rutted snow in WI the other day and it was down right scary how bad it handled. It was sliding off the crown of the road toward the ditch at 15 mph. I have good tires and it had very poor control. I will not drive mine in the snow again (and I drive my truck in mostany road conditions )
__________________
2006 Bounder 38N, C7 Cat
1 wife, 2 kids and 2 dogs
Whitewater, WI
milligsc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:06 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
macantic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Aiken,SC
Posts: 1,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by glarnold View Post
You expressed some concern about getting going from stopped. I would also be concerned about getting stopped from going.

If it were me, I would not put life or RV at risk.

Just my opinion.

GL Arnold
My thoughts also.
__________________
Good Sam Life Members
Served in U.S.A.F.
macantic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:26 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Gormleys's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Freightliner Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: CO
Posts: 674
I'd wait to de-winterize until you are further south. We took a great winter trip in February and loved every minute of it. Take a couple of gallons of water to flush the toilet and rinse in the sink. It's supposed to be below 10F here in Denver, but may be a bit warmer in the Springs tonight. This is Colorado. They'll get the roads plowed out tonight and tomorrow and they will be pretty dry, even on Raton Pass. But check the Colorado road condition site Road Conditions, Speeds, Travel Times, Traffic Cameras, Live Streaming Traffic Cameras, Road Closures and Road Work Information provided by Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) a branch of Colorado Department of Transportation before leaving. New Mexico conditions are at http://nmroads.com. No reason to end up like the picture above.
__________________
Colorado '15 Winnebago Forza 34T w/MKZ hybrid toad
Gormleys is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:31 PM   #11
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 763
Hah! Some interesting responses here.

Having driven transit buses in a city filled with hills, I can attest to the helpless feeling when sliding down a hill sideways in a heavy 40' vehicle just hoping that the thing would hit as few things as possible before coming to a stop. But having said that, a pusher or bus will handle fairly well in the snow as there is a lot of weight back there on the drive axle. I'm not sure about a front-engine gas motorhome, however, as I've never driven one in the snow.

It's under certain icy conditions when going down inclines that scare me in any heavy vehicle ...loosing control of such a vehicle ain't fun at all. On level pavement or slight inclines, you'll probably be okay. However, as most are saying, I'm not sure if I'd want to risk my own motorhome driving in mountainous areas in the snow and ice. If it's my job in a commercial vehicle, there's no choice, but in my own vehicle, I too probably wouldn't want to chance it.

I have driven our 35' DP in snow covered roads in the mountains several times but when the "chains required" controls go up, that's when I stop, sit, and wait it out ...which isn't usually very long on major highways, especially interstates. I carry cables but have never used them. I carry them as some states require that they be onboard during the winter months regardless of conditions.

-harry
__________________
amanda_h is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:35 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Pusherman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Rochester NY
Posts: 2,545
I wouldn't do it. Motorhomes are not like modern cars. If they get salt on them, they WILL rust . Coach builders just don't treat the metal like modern car makers do.

I have been chasing rust on my chassis for 2 years now. It hasn't been bad, but I've treated the wheel wells, the rear metal behind the engine, and both sides of the compartments, not to mention the oil pan, and now the windshield frame.

I don't drive my coach in salt, but we've had lots of coaches in our shop which the owner's have. Rust can be baadd.

Take my advice, and keep your coach off the salty roads.
__________________
Don
'07 Winnebago Journey 34H - CAT C7, Koni's, MCU's, SS Bell Crank, Safe-T-Plus
'07 HHR Toad, SMI AFO, Blue OX
Pusherman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 06:50 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: schaghticoke, new york
Posts: 269
I drove my motor home a 40' DP with a 22' enclosed trailer in tow, car inside of trailer In the PA. mountains 6" snow covered road still snowing. No problems or issues whatsoever But then again I am a very confident driver. Even called 911 to alert State Police that there was a semi jacknifed and blocking two of the travel lanes on I 81
__________________
doublechevy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 07:58 PM   #14
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pusherman View Post
I wouldn't do it. Motorhomes are not like modern cars. If they get salt on them, they WILL rust . Coach builders just don't treat the metal like modern car makers do.

I have been chasing rust on my chassis for 2 years now. It hasn't been bad, but I've treated the wheel wells, the rear metal behind the engine, and both sides of the compartments, not to mention the oil pan, and now the windshield frame.

I don't drive my coach in salt, but we've had lots of coaches in our shop which the owner's have. Rust can be baadd.

Take my advice, and keep your coach off the salty roads.
Ah, excellent advice, Don!

I didn't think about mentioning the "salt factor" here but I do think about it often and anytime I drive on even wet roads in a state that uses salt on their roads, I try to spray off the underside and exterior of our motorhome as soon as possible.

The times we've driven our Meridian on snow covered roads, each time it was in Washington state which doesn't use actual road salt but a cadre of de-icers on their roads -click here- . These de-icers can be corrosive too but not quite as bad as the road salt and sand -type of mixture that a lot of states use. I try to stay away from those states in the winter.

States that use road salt

That map isn't the most accurate or up to date but at least gives somewhat of an idea of what states use actual salt (chloride salts?) and which try other methods to de-ice their roads.

-harry
__________________

__________________
amanda_h is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.