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Old 02-18-2013, 08:56 PM   #43
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I'm still new to this DP thing(only about 150 miles under my belt) so I haven't learned the art of feathering the pedal to keep the EB from coming on when I want to coast. My dad does exactly that and it seems to work well for him. I have tried to do it, but it just seems like a lot of work. Isn't it easier to just turn the EB off? That way when I want to coast, I can and it won't come on. I find when I'm in the city, I will leave it on because I'm always slowing down or stopping. Maybe once I get many more miles under my belt, I'll learn to feather the pedal. But for right now, turning the EB on and off is much easier. Right now, being new, I find I have enough to worry about without worrying about the EB coming on and lurching the coach into slowing down.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:20 PM   #44
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Yes! Everybody has their own way to do things. This is a good thing, I believe, because others get to see many ways of doing things and can choose which way is best for them. So, far, in this thread I haven't seen anyone who does it "my way" so please allow me add to all the good info on this thread and post how I do it. I like using the EB because it saves major wear and tear on the brake linings which can be very expensive to replace. It also can be used continuously on a decline to manage speed without overheating. So there is a notion of safety with the use of EB in that you can count on it to keep your speed down on a steep decilne. I don't care for leaving the EB switch on - just my preference. So, I used to just reach over and turn on the EB switch when I wanted it to engage and turn it back off again when I was finished with it. After doing this for a couple of seasons, I got tired of having to take my eye off the road (to find the switch) and take one hand off the wheel (to use the switch) every time I wanted to turn the EB on or off. So, since my left foot never does anything, I installed a foot rest with a momentary foot switch on it wired in parallel with the console mounted EB switch. The footrest with the foot switch are on the floor to the left of the steering column. Now, I don't have to take my eye off the road to find the EB switch - I just slide my foot across the foot rest and find the foot switch. I can also keep both hands on the wheel while depressing the foot switch. As long as my foot is on the foot switch, the EB is turned on - even the light in the console mounted EB switch lights up! I was fortunate enough to find wiring schematics for my MH so it was relatively easy to figure out how to wire up the foot switch. It works great, didn't cost much and is very easy to use.
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:33 PM   #45
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I have to say that after reading all the different practices, I like the idea of the exhaust brake kicking in when I depress the brake pedal (latch mode) and CaymanPilots foot pedal switch. Both sound safe and practical... Of course that is just my opinion...
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Old 02-18-2013, 09:52 PM   #46
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CaymanPilot explains well how I feel about the switch. Given that we have pretty much the same MH I fully agree with how he employs the EB. He also has a great system modification.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:18 PM   #47
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Many DPs with factory auxiliary brakes do operate the brake lights when the aux brake kicks in. I think you said you fitted one to your pickup so obviously yours won't operate the same way.

"The higher the rpm the more effective the braking BTW." Yes, and lack of knowledge about how the system operates leads to the "Help, I come over the top of the hill at 65mph, lift my foot and nothing happens. My exhaust brake mustn't be working" posts that crop up on RV forums every now and then.

Some commercial coaches fitted with transmission retarders have a foot switch that operates it in much the same way as Steve's. One I drove once also had a dash switch as well - probably also like Steve's

Of course every owner and driver of RVs and for that matter, trucks, has their own way of getting from A to B. There are plenty who have 500hp rigs who set the cruise control at the first on-ramp and just steer until they need to get off for fuel or coffee. Others, perhaps with less powerful rigs, like to be at least partly in charge of their environment - so there is no one set of advice that everyone will agree with let alone adopt.
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Old 02-19-2013, 01:38 PM   #48
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Being new to motorhoming, I am certainly no expert. The exhaust brake is evidently not intended to be on all the time...that is why there is a switch. I engage it coming down steep inclines, short exit ramps and coming up on traffic lights that suddenly turn yellow in 50 mph zones. Other than that, I find the exhaust brake's forced downshifting to be more annoying than helpful. I would rather be in control of vehicle speed in traffic and only engage the cruise control when on the open highway. The idea of a foot switch (and indicator light) wired in parallel to the panel switch is definitely on my short list before this year's western swing.
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Old 02-19-2013, 01:55 PM   #49
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After reading all these posts, I still think installing the BrakeSwitch is the perfect solution. With it, I can leave the PacBrake switch on all the time and the exhaust brake only engages when I press the brake pedal. I don't want to take my eyes off the road to find the switch! JMHO
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Old 02-19-2013, 06:22 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phinneyj View Post

Rude to me is when someone calls BS. (Spelled Out) when expressing their opinion of mine. That particular comment was edited out and replaced with "bunk" later on. Another poster felt that the comment by that poster was not over the top. I disagree. Everybody has opinions, express your opinion and then move on. If you disagree then just say you disagree, explain why and post any relevant information to support your opinion. That is how we learn. You don't need to tell someone that their opinion is Bull $#*t. It is disrespectful and it chills the free exchange of ideas.
Jeff,

First let me apologize to you for your misinterpretation of my post. It was not aimed or pointed directed at you. If you look at the specific times of each post, we were both composing at the same time but unfortunately yours hit the log sequence before mine so it appeared to be directly in response to you but it wasn't. When I post, if I am referring directly to someone, I will ALWAYS include and QUOTE their post as a point of reference.

That's why I went back to edit with something less crass. As a result, I have reflected on some of my posts in other threads where I have been a little over the top and I need to tone them down.

I have also become more humbled to the point where I need to step back and just post MY opinion and then leave. It is then up to others to determine for themselves what the best course of action to take.

We are all different and have very different rigs. Therefore one size does NOT fit all.

Please accept my sincere apology.

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Old 02-19-2013, 09:44 PM   #51
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Quote:
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Please accept my sincere apology.

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Richard,
No sweat, we're cool, 'tis the nature of internet. I work hard to maintain an even keel in my personal and professional life. I am not always successful, after all we all human.

I have learned some things from your posts, and I respect and appreciate that. Thank you.
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Old 02-20-2013, 10:08 AM   #52
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To Richard and Jeff

Now THAT's why folks love this forum!
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Old 02-20-2013, 10:20 PM   #53
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Have been using my EB on my 2001 Dodge Diesel using the switch on the gear shift knob that my thumb sits on. 234,000 miles and finally decided to get new brakes when Les Schwab said it was time. The technician couldn't believe they were the original brakes. My preference in the MH as well in the Dodge is to keep the EB off while driving on the highway. For the MH I leave the switch "on" in heavy city traffic. As the for the Dodge, I switch it on and off for every slow down. The difference is.....my thumb is on the switch as I drive. The MH is not as easy since the switch is on my left side control panel, but I'm a one handed driver. So, I have found myself many times, driving in town with hand on the switch and one hand on the wheel. If my hand wasn't on the switch, it would be on my lap....just not a two handed driver.
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:17 AM   #54
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For the MH I leave the switch "on" in heavy city traffic. As the for the Dodge, I switch it on and off for every slow down. The difference is.....my thumb is on the switch as I drive. The MH is not as easy since the switch is on my left side control panel, but I'm a one handed driver. So, I have found myself many times, driving in town with hand on the switch and one hand on the wheel. If my hand wasn't on the switch, it would be on my lap....just not a two handed driver.
I don't want to sideline this thread but I feel that this point is important.

Hopefully, when only using one hand on the wheel "in town" your speeds are slow enough that if you were to experience a front tire blow-out you would be able to handle the rig and steering appropriately without veering off the road. However, once out of town and driving at highway speeds I would fully recommend that you have two hands on the wheel.

Also, the Exhaust Brake is only active once the coach gets to a minimum speed but I can't remember what that speed happens to be.

As you are passing or in my case being passed by OTR big rigs, take a look at most of those driver's. You will noticed that they have both hands on the wheel, 10 & 2 positions.

Having a front tire blow-out is my worst fear while driving. I have read about too many RVer's along with having friends who have had front tire blow-outs that have caused major damage and death.

Installing Tyron Bands would be one method to help with those situations, but they are expensive. However, that expense is peanuts when compared to what a front tire blow-out can cause.

Just a word of caution and opinion.

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Old 02-21-2013, 01:57 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr4Film View Post
I don't want to sideline this thread but I feel that this point is important.

Hopefully, when only using one hand on the wheel "in town" your speeds are slow enough that if you were to experience a front tire blow-out you would be able to handle the rig and steering appropriately without veering off the road. However, once out of town and driving at highway speeds I would fully recommend that you have two hands on the wheel.

Also, the Exhaust Brake is only active once the coach gets to a minimum speed but I can't remember what that speed happens to be.

As you are passing or in my case being passed by OTR big rigs, take a look at most of those driver's. You will noticed that they have both hands on the wheel, 10 & 2 positions.

Having a front tire blow-out is my worst fear while driving. I have read about too many RVer's along with having friends who have had front tire blow-outs that have caused major damage and death.

Installing Tyron Bands would be one method to help with those situations, but they are expensive. However, that expense is peanuts when compared to what a front tire blow-out can cause.

Just a word of caution and opinion.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
Richard, having as front tire blowout was my greatest fear after we got the Class A. That's why I decided to install the SteerSafe stabilizers right away. I know some people install them to improve the handling on their MH, but I couldn't ask for better handling on the Windsor. My sole purpose in installing them was for better control in case of a blowout. I decided to install them myself and it was fairly easy. I feel a LOT safer now!
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:07 PM   #56
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I haven't installed the brakeswitch or set latch mode, so I turn my EB on and off myself. I am not a fan of feathering because I don't like the consequence of the coach dropping down a couple of gears if I misjudge it; my preference is that when I am off the throttle, I am completely off the throttle.

Personally, I wish I could just get my trans set not to downshift at all when the brake kicks in; I would prefer to manually manage it; there are a number of times I would like just a little bit of drag and would leave it on in 5th, but the programming drops down to 4th, which then actively slows the coach below my speed target.

Steve
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