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Old 10-18-2014, 01:51 PM   #15
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It appears that is a single stage converter, NOT the best choice in converters, (not the worst, but then they do not make it any more, but it is a long way from the best)

Just so you know.
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:22 AM   #16
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I talked to someone on the telephone about all this, and was told the same thing. The rear AC would it's power from the generator. There are two breakers right at the generator, a 30 and and a 20 amp. I assume the 20 is for the rear AC.

I'm not just changing out the electrical panel so I can run both AC units. After all, it getting damn cold outside!

This past summer I pretty got away with just the rear AC running. The cooler air did circulate through the coach. I mean, it still got hot in here, but was tolerable.

Funny thing though, if it got up to 90, the circuit breaker would trip. And I mean each and every time it got up to 90, when it was needed the most.

Anyway, my main reason to upgrade this panel is so I can run more electrical heaters in here. With the current service, I'm only able to run one heater in here.

And not without some issues... It gets plugged into a standard 15 amp circuit. With my television and receiver running I'll pop that 15 amp breaker.

The heater on high will consume 12.5 amps by itself, so there isnt much left over for other things. So when I have the television and receiver on, I can only use the heater on a low setting.

Unfortunately, I don't have anywhere else to go, and am going to have to try sticking it out throuh the winter in this coach. So I need more heaters!

My fixed income just won't pay the estimated couple hundred a month that would be needed to run my propane furnaces through the winter.

They do work well, just won't be able to afford the propane. The flat rate I pay for electric will allow me to add more heaters in here without raising my costs.

The heat issue is just one issue I'll need to deal with. Very soon now they will be turning off the water for the season...

Ive got get this panel changed out, woke up this morning and it as only 55 degrees in here! Brrrr...

Though even after I change out the panel, I have to come up with a way to buy more heaters. And those rated for continuous use are expensive.
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:38 AM   #17
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>It appears that is a single stage converter, NOT the best choice in converters, (not the worst, but then they do not make it any more, but it is a long way from the best)

Just so you know.



Are you talking about the converter that's built in to the new panel?

That and yhr generator transfer switch is getting a bit above and beyong my knowledge of things.

I've installed and worked on regular breaker panels before, but I'm finding that these are quite different!

AC & DC together, a converter and transfer switch? I hope I'm not taking on more than I can figure out on my own.

Of course I'm getting great help through this forum! Thanks to all that's responded...

I'm learning what to do, but I want to learn all the 'whys' too. Is there a book called 'RVs For Dummies'? LoL!
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:42 AM   #18
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>Your replies are in time of arrival sequence, so if somebody else replies while you are typing, their reply will show ahead of yours. The duplicate is something you did on your own, probably hit "send' twice on your browser.



Yea... Sorry to everybody here about this thread being a 'mess'.I'm still learning how to use forums.
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Old 10-19-2014, 09:43 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by jb60 View Post
Hello all,

Still a newbie here, but finding some very useful help here.

I have a 1992 Fleetwood Pace Arrow, Model 37J, (37 foot).

I'm in the process of upgrading the electrical service from 30 amp to 50 amp.

The new electrical panel, (a Parallex 5355), has a new built in converter as a part of it, so that's one concern I don't have.

However in a conversation I had with someone, I was told that I would also need to upgrade/change the generator transfer switch as well.

I've already been 'scouting around' in back of the existing panel that I'll be removing.

I'm trying to make as many decisions about things as possible, before I unplug from the pole and pull the existing panel out.

That would be, 'the part of no return', lol...

Anyway, in that scouting around, I'm not seeing anything that 'might be' a generator transfer switch.

Basically I'm seeing the main electrical panel, the DC fuse area, then a separate power converter.

So I'm wondering where the generator transfer switch might be?

I must admit, I have not looked anywhere around the generator itself as of yet. I wouldn't know what it would even look like.

So can anyone tell me where this generator transfer switch might be, and what it might look like?

Then 'maybe' a recommendation of a good brand, model number, and the best place to get one.

Thanks!
You haven't really said why you want to do this switch to 50A service. If you would clarify that, it would help. If you don't need to run both AC units at the same time, then what is the conversion for? The AC's running together is usually the greatest amp requirement in a MH. Give us more info and maybe we would have another option for you.

I am also concerned that you are attempting a very complex and dangerous undertaking without sufficient knowledge of the system and electrical parts required to do it. I have found that when it comes to RV electrical, even a regular electrician is sometimes confused by all the possibilities an RV can have (generator, shore power, 12v systems, chassis batteries, house batteries, etc.) and all interconnected in some way thru relays, solenoids, etc. IT'S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE BUT IT IS SCIENCE.

I don't think you should attempt this until you get more educated on the subject or get an RV electrician to assist you. Don't be in a hurry when working with electricity. JMTCW

John
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Old 10-20-2014, 09:34 AM   #20
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You haven't really said why you want to do this switch to 50A service. If you would clarify that, it would help. If you don't need to run both AC units at the same time, then what is the conversion for? The AC's running together is usually the greatest amp requirement in a MH. Give us more info and maybe we would have another option for you.

I am also concerned that you are attempting a very complex and dangerous undertaking without sufficient knowledge of the system and electrical parts required to do it. I have found that when it comes to RV electrical, even a regular electrician is sometimes confused by all the possibilities an RV can have (generator, shore power, 12v systems, chassis batteries, house batteries, etc.) and all interconnected in some way thru relays, solenoids, etc. IT'S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE BUT IT IS SCIENCE.

I don't think you should attempt this until you get more educated on the subject or get an RV electrician to assist you. Don't be in a hurry when working with electricity. JMTCW

John
John see post #16
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Old 10-20-2014, 11:13 AM   #21
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Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by zzjea View Post
You haven't really said why you want to do this switch to 50A service. If you would clarify that, it would help. If you don't need to run both AC units at the same time, then what is the conversion for? The AC's running together is usually the greatest amp requirement in a MH. Give us more info and maybe we would have another option for you.

I am also concerned that you are attempting a very complex and dangerous undertaking without sufficient knowledge of the system and electrical parts required to do it. I have found that when it comes to RV electrical, even a regular electrician is sometimes confused by all the possibilities an RV can have (generator, shore power, 12v systems, chassis batteries, house batteries, etc.) and all interconnected in some way thru relays, solenoids, etc. IT'S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE BUT IT IS SCIENCE.

I don't think you should attempt this until you get more educated on the subject or get an RV electrician to assist you. Don't be in a hurry when working with electricity. JMTCW

John




Thanks for the advice. A bit too late, as I already spent a day crawling around the coach running that big 'honking' 50 amp cable! That was a job...

I had ordered a 50 foot cable as I couldn't follow what was originally done with 30 amp cable.

There was about 30 feet coming out of the little compartment, that terminated into an electrical junction box.

From that point the three individual wires were like stripped out of the heavy jacket and put in plastic wire loom and were run above the fresh water tank before I lost site of them.

I assume it followed some path through the walls or floor, but at some point came out under the area where the old panel is located.

I knew I wasn't going to be able to follow the same path, and my new 50 amp cable would have to be run under the coach.

The main reason I bought a 50 foot length. I was lucky, I found a great path for that run under the coach.

Except where it come out of the little compartment, and goes up through the floor where the panel is, all of the cable was run in the 'C' part, (channel), of the frame.

And all completely covered by one thing or another thing under there, such as the fuel tank, and other things. I didn't even have to use any wire ties to hold the cable in there, except for those two areas where it came out of the frame.

I'm kind of a fanatic when it come to electrical work and safety, and I'm 100% confident that the 50 amp cable is totally safe run inside the frame as it is.

Such a fanatic about things, that when I combine wires, they get twisted, soldered, wire nutted, then taped.

Anyway, where it does come out of the frame, even though it has a real thick jacket on it, I'll still be wrapping it in plastic wire loom.

From my crawling around under there, I noticed a lot of wires in wire loom under the coach.

Then, I already have the brand new panel and breakers, extra 12 gauge wire and both 15 and 20 amp outlets, and everything to do this swap, except for the generator transfer switch. Well, and some 'options' available for the new panel.

I spent the entire day yesterday just looking at the old panel, and the new panel. Then opening up the hole where the new panel needs to go.

I actually had the entire old panel pulled out, nearly in my lap. I had spent all that time just looking, (learning), and just figuring everything out.

I even found the existing generator transfer switch. It a part of the existing panel, in a separate type compartment.

With regards to 'experience', I do have a background in electronics. I've wired and trimmed out more low voltage panels than I could even count.

And I've done a few regular electrical panels as well. Believe me, I do realize how much different the complex wiring is in an RV!

But if changing the panel out was something I thought was beyond my capabilites, , I wouldn't attempt it.

Apart from the generator transfer switch, I'm basically going to be changing wire for wire. Well, up to a point...

Naturally I'll be eliminating the 30 amp cable and wiring in my 50 amp cable. Then, I'll be tracing out a 'whole lot' of wires, all combined on only 4 circuits, and splitting them up so they're on their own breakers.

Why?

Not just so I can run two AC units in the summer... winter is very fast approaching!

As things are, I'm only able to run 'one' electric heater in here. There is just too much all combined onto 4 circuits.

I'm constantly popping breakers because the one electrical heater I'm running now is taking 12.5 amps on a 15 amp circuit.

That doesn't leave enough for me to run my receiver and television at the same time. Plus, I'm planning on adding more electric heaters in here.

With no other place to go, I'm forced to try and make it through this winter in this coach. And that means adding more electric heaters.

Yes, I have two operational furnaces in here. But my fixed income and tight budget will just not pay the estimated $200 a month in propane costs.

Yes, I really did just sit for hours with the two panels side by side comparing things. I already figured out my wire routes, wishing the new panel had a 3/4 inch knockout where there was only a 1/2 inch knockout, (and such things).

With my background, it's going to be easy just swapping the panels out. Also, with my test equipment, tracing out, and splitting up all the wires that are combined together on only 4 breakers.

Now I've got as many as 12 circuits that I can split everything up on. Not to mention thr extra curcuits I'll be putting in.

Yes, I still have more to learn about RV circuits. But this part of it, the swapping out of the panels, I can easily handle. And also, splitting up all the various circuits combined onto 4 circuits.

And my crawling aroung under the coach isn't over with either! I've got an extra 100 feet of 12 gauge wire for extra outlets I'll be installing for those extra heaters I'll be putting in.

So hope that clarifies some things. Again, I'll be the first to admit I've got more to learn about RV electrical wiring, otherwise I wouldn't be here right now.

But I do learn fast. And I have the kind of analytical mind that can figure at least 'most' things out.

Thanks a lot for your concern and input
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Old 10-20-2014, 09:54 PM   #22
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Sorry I overlooked post 16 that described your plans. Sounds like you have things under control and are safety conscious. I would look and study a lot as well. Good luck.

I added a 20A external shore connection to a previous 30A MH I had before this one. It went directly from the shore power outlet to a female 20A receptacle I added under the slide so when it was open, I could connect a 20A extension cord to it from the 20A shore outlet. I could plug it in there and it went to a single circuit outlet I had added inside the coach for a heater or whatever. I could plug the same extension cord into another receptacle I converted for the rear AC in the Summer. The 20A extension did not connect with or interfere with the 30A service. The circuit breaker for the extension was the breaker on the shore pedestal. I could run at least 2 heaters, one or 2 from the regular 30A outlets and one from the 20A outlet I added. Most all shore power pedestals have at least 30A AND 20A outlets plus a 50A at many sites. I used the 30A outlet and the 20A outlet at the same time which in effect gave me ~50 Amps. I could also run both ACs on this setup as the ACs only require about <20A each. If the generator was running, it was setup to run everything at 50A, which mainly meant the rear AC could run along with the front AC at the same time. So in effect I had 50A service without rewiring the main coach. It was cheap and rather easy to do.

It worked for me, but your solution will be more elegant and conventional.

John
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Old 10-21-2014, 09:43 AM   #23
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[snip] So in effect I had 50A service without rewiring the main coach. It was cheap and rather easy to do.

John
John I think in the RV world "50A service" will actually provide 100 amperes total maxed out (short term).

That's 12,000 watts vs 6000 watts nominal.

I may be wrong but this is my understanding.
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Old 10-21-2014, 09:44 AM   #24
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Hi John

Quote:
Originally Posted by zzjea View Post
Sorry I overlooked post 16 that described your plans. Sounds like you have things under control and are safety conscious. I would look and study a lot as well. Good luck.

I added a 20A external shore connection to a previous 30A MH I had before this one. It went directly from the shore power outlet to a female 20A receptacle I added under the slide so when it was open, I could connect a 20A extension cord to it from the 20A shore outlet. I could plug it in there and it went to a single circuit outlet I had added inside the coach for a heater or whatever. I could plug the same extension cord into another receptacle I converted for the rear AC in the Summer. The 20A extension did not connect with or interfere with the 30A service. The circuit breaker for the extension was the breaker on the shore pedestal. I could run at least 2 heaters, one or 2 from the regular 30A outlets and one from the 20A outlet I added. Most all shore power pedestals have at least 30A AND 20A outlets plus a 50A at many sites. I used the 30A outlet and the 20A outlet at the same time which in effect gave me ~50 Amps. I could also run both ACs on this setup as the ACs only require about <20A each. If the generator was running, it was setup to run everything at 50A, which mainly meant the rear AC could run along with the front AC at the same time. So in effect I had 50A service without rewiring the main coach. It was cheap and rather easy to do.

It worked for me, but your solution will be more elegant and conventional.

John
Hello John,

Where I'm corrently at, there are several 50 amp plugs on a pole, (I had to but the 50 amp to 30 amp adapte to plug in),, then only one, (either a 15 or 20 amp), plug.

The one (15/20) amp plug was already being used by someone else.

As I mentioned I've got one heater plugged into a 15 amp curcuit. And the issue is that everything else is wired into that same 15 amp circuit. The reason I'm always popping that breaker.

I have to confess that I do have a 20 amp circuit that's hardly ever used for anything.

Basically 3 minutes in the morning, 'maybe' 10 minutes a couple nights a week.

It's a shared / switched 20 amp circuit for the microwave and the washer/dryer.

There is a switch in the kitchen area, like above thr sink thats labeled 'microwave', and 'washer/dryer.

The washer/dryer is not working at the moment as it needs a new belt.

Fixing that going to involve removing cabinet trim, disconnecting the water and drain lines, unplugging it, then pulling it completely out of the space it's in, to work on it.

That will not be an easy task! Once it's pulled out, there will be no getting around it. It will basically block any path between the kitchen/dinning area, and the hall going to the bathroom and bedroom.

I already know which ever side I'll be on, I best have every tool I'll need to work on it, and/or already been to the bathroom, or I'll be crawling over the top of it.

Living here full time, I'm needing to empty my holding tanks once a week. And that's not taking my showers here. I've been going to the shower house for that.

I guess I have large holding tanks... 80 gallons for fresh, (which I don't use, being connected to the camp's water hook-up).

Which by the way is due to get turned off very shortly now!

Then 44 gallons for the black water, and 54 gallons for the gray water.

I mean, all I do is wash dishes, sometimes rinse something off, but my gray water tank needs to get emptied once a week.

I'm sure I can go a couple weeks on the black tank, but as long as I'm doing the gray tank, I might as well do the black tank at the same time.

I have a 42 gallon 'blue boy', so I need to make two trips anyway just for the gray tank. So why make that second trip with only 12 gallons in it... I'll go ahead a do the black tank too.

And it's probably good to do the black tank once a week anyway, so I don't get too much 'build-up' in there.

Anyway, I can imagine if I use the washer/dryer, I'll probably need to empty twice a week.

It would be a lot more convenient, (and cheaper), than going to the laundromat, but is a project a bit further down on the list.

I'll kind-of stay, 'a bit" off subject here for another paragraph...

Don't know if anyone else does this, but I'll empty my black tank (for as much as comes out). I know not everything ever comes out of it.

And yea, I have a hose connection there that's supposed to rinse it out, but doesn't do that good of a job of it.

So once the black tank is emptied, I'll cap the outlet off, open the black valve, then open the gray water valve.

By doing that, I'll have 54 gallons of soapy dish water 'try' to rush into the black tank. Naturally, it's not all going to flow in there. Water seeks it's own level, and at some point it will equalize, probably around 27 gallons in each tank at that point.

But I figure by doing that, I'm getting a better flushing of my black tank. I'll emply the black tank once again, then do that all over a second, sometimes a third time, before my blue boy gets filled.

It makes no difference, it all goes into the blue boy anyway. And I 'believe' I'm getting a better flushing of my black tank.

Anyway, back to the electrical... so yea, I have this 20 amp circuit that gets used 3 minutes in the morning to heat my coffee, then 'maybe' 10 minutes a couple times a week when I use my microwave for cooking a dinner.

Even if the washer/dryer was working, what's that... 'maybe' an hour, 'maybe' a couple times a week?

That's kind of s waste of a 20 amp circuit. But the circuit is dedicated for those two appliances, and that's it. And is a reason why it is switched. So you can't use both at the same time.

Don't know about the old microwave, possibly it needed a 20 amp circuit, but I already replaced that microwave with a newer, more modern microwave I had.

And that had run fine in the past off a 15 amp circuit.

So this place 'for sure' could use some rewiring. Also, some outlets down near the floor. I dont like these outlets mounted under the overhead cabinets.

I just wish I could have got an earlier start on it...

I had thought of trying to run an extension cord off the pole, then some route into the coach, but that only would had provided me with one extra heater.

Yea, 30 amp in the coach, another 20 amp off the pole would add up to 50 amp total. But the way this coach is wired, I just won't be able to use that 30 amp efficiency.

Then, I was told that in all reality I would have a total of 100 amp service in here. That what I would actually be doing is splitting the 240 volt off the pole, into two 120 volt legs. So I would be getting two 120 volt, 50 amp legs.

Don't know how true or accurate that is. I've never worked with anything higher than 120 volt, 15 and 20 amp circuits. My main breaker is a double 50 amp breaker, but tied together.

But either way, my coach will be upgraded to 50 amp service, and the various circuits will get split up on their own breakers, (as they should be). Not all combined onto one breaker.

I have no idea what this winter is going to be like. Hopyfully nothing like last year! But I want to be prepared for 'whatever' now.

I'm thinking, (hoping), that three electric heaters will keep this coach livable. Again, I don't have any other place to go.

But, with the upgraded 50 amp service, I'll even be able to put a forth heater in here, (if necessary).

Thanks for your reply and thoughts!
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Old 10-21-2014, 10:27 AM   #25
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John I think in the RV world "50A service" will actually provide 100 amperes total maxed out (short term).

That's 12,000 watts vs 6000 watts nominal.

I may be wrong but this is my understanding.
I realize that but for my purposes it amounted to 50A service even though it was not a true 100A on 2 legs (2x50). I could run just about everything in the coach at the same time with this setup and it worked for me.

The so called 50A Service at the box is actually 100A (if it is wired properly) but it is distributed to two Hot legs (each at 50A) of the outlet with a neutral and ground. Each Hot leg goes to a separate junction on the coach distribution panel and is usually distributed on 2 50A junctions that feed multiple circuits. The high amp circuits (ACs, washer dryer, MW), are often on the same junction (leg) and the other leg handles about all the other outlets in the coach (usually lower amp draw). Each manufacturer will do it a little differently however. At least that is my understanding.

John
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Old 10-21-2014, 10:35 AM   #26
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jb60

I think you are doing the right thing given your situation. You will have ~100A to the coach and that will handle just about anything you throw at it. See my earlier post re. the 50A (100A) discussion. Good luck and stay safe.

John
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Old 10-22-2014, 02:52 PM   #27
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In case you don't already have them, you should be able to download some of the manuals for your coach or contact Fleetwood to find them. Wiring and plumbing diagrams can be valuable when working such proijects as you are undertaking.

And don't forget to go back to your iRV2 setup and add a signature block to include your name and rig with at least the make, model, and year. I know you have it in your first post, but it is convenient for us following to be reminded without having to go back to the beginning.

I did some modifying on my previous coach a couple years ago, but I simply added an extension cord for the rear A/C and a way to select either or both. Good luck.
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Old 10-23-2014, 09:01 AM   #28
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I think you are doing the right thing given your situation. You will have ~100A to the coach and that will handle just about anything you throw at it. See my earlier post re. the 50A (100A) discussion. Good luck and stay safe.

John
I did read all of the threads with great interest, as I'm always intetested in learning new things, and other's opinions.

Today is the day for the change out. Still going to be cold out, but all sunshine, which will help keep it warm in here while I'm unplugged from the pole.

My 50 amp cord is already hanging out there readyto be plugged in, and the other end is already coiled up where the panel is.

If necessary, if something goes wrong, if I get hung up on something, I can always put things back the way they were. But I'll still be plugged into my 50 amp service and be wired into the new panel.

I don't forsee that happening, but that option is there. I'm taking pictures of everything as I go along, and will be labeling wires as I go along.

I'll have to just wire nut off the generator transfer switch until I get a new one.

Though I do plan on researching the one that's in there if possible. While checking thing out in there, I actually found that the converter thats in there is a 50 amp converter.

Don't know why, maybe it was replaced at some point. Buy the new panel has a converter built into it, so I'll be pulling the one that's in there out.

One thing I like about the new panel, is that it has a fan in it, just like a computer fan.

As it was, heat did build up in there, which probably contributed some to my circuits popping all the time.

Just a thought I had yesterday, an electrical panel below a refrigerator? Probably not the very best option or idea...

The refrigerator is non-frost free, so that has to get de-iced at times. There is no automatic ice maker in there, so you're constantly filling ice cube trays and trying not to spill while getting then into the freezer.

Then, looking under where all the wires are, there are also copper lines in there, where wires are wrapped around, cable-tied to, and just next to those lines.

Something I 'hope' to separate some while I'm working in there. I can only imagine that those copper lines are for the propane for the refrigerator and stove, (which is next to the refrigerator).

Then 'possibly' drain lines for the refrigerator too.

And where there are copper lines, there is usually some condensation on them. Though it does stay hot enough in there to 'possibly' evaporate the condensation.

But if it were 'my' initial design, they would had been separated. But that's just my opinion...

I'm not an engineer and what was done must obviously work, otherwise they all would have been recalled, or burned down by now.

One other decision I made which I'm sure I'll get some comments about.

When I know that I'll be running additional circuits, I knew I was going to have to order wire. I know romex is the 'standard'...

I was just going to order a roll of 12 gauge, (2 plus a ground), whether it was going to be a 15 or 20 amp circuit.

Having worked with romex in the past, I know how stiff and how hard it it is to work with.

My big 'honking' 50 amp cable was made up of stranded wire, and even with that big outer shield on it, was nice and flexible.

And I discovered the 'C' part of the frame rail that it just laid in there so perfectly.

I knew trying to run romex for my extra circuits in there as well, would had been a real pain in the ass, and most likely a two person job.

And being as stiff as it is, wasn't going to just lay in there nicely. So I made a decision which I'm sure will stir up some controversy.

As opposed to ordering romex, I ordered a 100 foot roll of 12/3 heavy duty, outdoor rated extension cord.

I figure what's really the difference? One is flat, one is round, and they both have a tuff outer shield on them.

And the more flexable extension cord would be much easier to work with, then also lay nicely in that frame channel, just like the 50 amp cable did.

I mean if stranded cable was good enough for the 50 amp main, why not for 15 and 20 amp circuits?

So okay, it's not 'code'... but this thing isn't going to be going through any more inspections.

And again, what's 'really' the difference? They're both 12 gauge wire, (2 plus a ground), and it's a fact that stranded wire has less resistance than solid wire.

Then, this whole place is 'loaded' with wires just laid in plastic wire loom. Single conductors, two wires, three wires, (and so on), that's probably carrying high amps, and not in a thick outer jacket, just the regular insulation on the wire.

In fact the wires that are carrying the 30 amps from the little compartment in the back of the coach, are stripped out of that thick black outer jacket, and are run individually in plastic wire loom, all the way up to the panel.

Romex may be good inside walls, in new construction, but for running under a vehicle, I personally don't think it would be the best choice.

I mean I could had just purchased individual rolls of white, black, and green wires, stuffed them into plastic wire loom to run under the coach, and wouldn't had really done anything different than the factory did.

And when dealing with stranded wire, I'll usually tin the ends before tieing them down under a screw.

The thicker outer jacket on the extension cord wire will better protect the inner conductors. And naturally wherever it might be exposed, just going from the frame channel, over to where the breaker box is, it will be even better protected with plastic wire loom around it.

The 'flat' shape of romex would require a much larger size of wire loom. Then say when you go to tire it down with a cable tie, it will crush and deform the wire loom, to where parts of the wire would be exposed anyway.

This isn't the first time I've worked with wires... I had spent about 35 years running burglar alarm, fire alarm, telephone, CCTV, cable television, intercom, just about every type of wire there is, including cable of 00 gauge on a special project I did.

But that I did run in seal-tight, as that was exposed under a vehicle.

And I typically will never crimp... I always solder my connections. So I'm sure I can handle most of this project.

Again, for the time being the generator transfer switch wires will be labeled and capped off. I don't forsee needing the generator in the near future.

When I do get a new generator transfer switch,; and am ready to put it in, I 'may' be back here, lol...

Do have one question maybe someone can answer now. Looking at the generator, I do see a 30 amp and a 20 amp breaker in there.

Oh, I do have a 7000 watt genetator in here, if that makes any difference.

I'm thinking that does add up to 50 amps, (I doubt it...), but am I going to have to change those?

Or just do some other wiring at the transfer switch itself.

I've already been scouting around the internet for transfer switches. Found some are in some really 'big' enclosures, others not too bad.

The generator ttansfer switch that's a part of the old panel, is in a box about 4" x 4", as someone in this thread mentioned to me.

I wish the generator transfer switch would had been an option on the new panel. I would had ordered it that way.

But it does have the converter built into it which will help. The old, separate converter that's in there now is 'big'. It takes up a lot of space.

Once I remove that, I'll have plenty of space for the generator transfer switch, no matter how big it might be.

Again, thanks for the help, concern, and encouragement!

I haven't had one negative comment about 'not' doing this upgrade in this forum, like I've got just from talking to others about it. Just basically concerns about doing it, which I really appreciated!

But I think I've convinced those that did express those concerns, that I should be able to handle at least the majority of it.

So again, today is the day!

Right now I'm trying to build up some heat in here before I pull the plug, lol...

By very early afternoon the sun should be shinning brightly, and help keep it warm in here until I'm ready to plug in again.

(Hope this doesn't post twice... I hit 'submit reply', and the page doesn't change)

Damn... just looked back and found this never posted yesterday. At least the page never changed. Has there been issues with the web site?
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