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Old 10-23-2014, 10:02 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jb60 View Post

As opposed to ordering romex, I ordered a 100 foot roll of 12/3 heavy duty, outdoor rated extension cord.
If using romex I would suggest "direct burial" type as it's waterproof whereas the house wiring type is not.

The flexible "extension cord" is best choice in my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jb60 View Post

Do have one question maybe someone can answer now. Looking at the generator, I do see a 30 amp and a 20 amp breaker in there.

Oh, I do have a 7000 watt genetator in here, if that makes any difference.

I'm thinking that does add up to 50 amps, (I doubt it...), but am I
going to have to change those?

As far as the transfer switch is concerned no. Neutral, 30a and 20a will be switched.

I would be leery of soldering connections for 120vac. Mechanical connections, if done right, are the way to go. Soldering and then using a wire nut will still allow the connection to come apart if the solder melts as the wire nut never had a chance to secure the connection. This is just my opinion.
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:14 AM   #30
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Hi

Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired and Happy View Post
In case you don't already have them, you should be able to download some of the manuals for your coach or contact Fleetwood to find them. Wiring and plumbing diagrams can be valuable when working such proijects as you are undertaking.

And don't forget to go back to your iRV2 setup and add a signature block to include your name and rig with at least the make, model, and year. I know you have it in your first post, but it is convenient for us following to be reminded without having to go back to the beginning.

I did some modifying on my previous coach a couple years ago, but I simply added an extension cord for the rear A/C and a way to select either or both. Good luck.


Wiring diagrams? No, I don't have those, but I'd certainly like to get them!

Yesterday was kind of a disaster. I got in trouble about an hour into it.

I was 'thinking' I would find those thick, stranded wires from the 30 amp cable going right into the breaker box, feeding the buss bars.

Well not so... I did see a thick stranded white and black wire in there, but it came out of the box in the rear, where the generator transfer switch was located.

And the only thing that was going 'into' that box, were two pieces of romex. There was a little label in there saying 'Line' and 'Generator', then just showing a couple lines.

Not actual connections though. There were two white and black wires coming out of the generator trandsfer switch that wire spliced together with wire nuts.

I never did identify the actual wires coming from that 30 amp cable. I should be able to do that today.

Oh, this for sure didn't get done in a day! I was really upset, 'all' my DC wires were really short! I couldn't have the nee panel all the way out of the opening to work on it.

And naturally I did not get to trim out that part of the panel the way I like to do, which is neatly, with all the wires cut at their proper length. It's a mess!

I had to pull and tug on wires to get them to their proper termination point. And that took a lot longer to do as it should.

I was running out of daylight, (I did have a big lantern down on the floor with me for light), but it was still getting late, and I hadn't even started on the AC side yet, other than wiring in the 50 amp main cable.

I eas really disappointed with those DC wires, but it would take a lot of time splicing longer lengths on them.

Not to mention, I would have to buy several small spools of various different color wires to keep the same colors. Though none are labeled as to what they go to. They all look to be about a 10 gauge wire.

Advanced Auto does have small spools of wire, but they're not cheap. Then I'll need butt connectors as well.

I with me being kind of a fanatic about wiring, I would rip off the plastic of the butt connector so I can solder the wires together. Naturally placing a piece of heat shrink tubing on one of the wires before soldering.

That way after it's soldered, I can slide the heat shrink tubing down and covering over the butt connector and wires.

Well, maybe one day when I have more time... Again, as it is I can't pull the panel all the way out of the opening to work in it.

Though once it's done, hopefully I'll never have to pull it out again. Well, I will have to pull it out once again when I get a new generator transfer switch.

I'm sure I'll be back here asking about that, as I surely couldn't analyze how that got wired in! Maybe the new one will come with instructions, lol...

This new panel didn't come with any instructions. The company says they're working on some. But that those that typically purchase these, usually know how they're supposed to go in.

That old converter I took out was like double tha size of the new one. I suspect new technology allows them to be smaller.

And actually, it was heavier than the whole new entire panel. It was a beast! Strange wiring... there was an outlet wired in there to plug the converter into.

But the outlet had three pieces of romex coming out of that little cheap outlet box. I opened it up and couldn't believe how it was made!

Wires are pushed down into like a 'V', that pierces the outer insulation and makes contact with the copper wire. Really junkie, in my opinion.

Then under that outlet was another, only that one didnt have a plug in it. I figure it's just used as a junction box. But there are 4 pieces of romex coming out of there. Well, most likely two in, and two out.

I plan on getting into that today. One thing that's really bugging me, was the extra wires going to the converter outlet.

One goal I had was splitting things up on their own circuits. What 'really' pisses me off, it this ground fault outlet in the bathroom.

Yea, there should be a ground fault outlet in the bathroom, kitchen, and any outside outlets.

I have this outlet outside, but it's 'not' a ground fault outlet. What I eventually found out, was that it was wired to the ground fault in the bathroom.

Yea, I've got some things plugged in outside, and yea I've tripped that ground fault in the bathroom a real pain in the ass, as I have to run inside the coach and go to the bathroom to reset the switch.

But what 'really' sets me off, is that bathroom ground fault will kill 'every' other outlet in the coach!

I'm surely hoping I can figure a way to change that. I'd much rather have a separate ground fault outside.

That outlet has one bad side on it anyway, so I have a new, ground fault outlet to put in out there.

Once I open it up, I might find it goes on to a next outlet, then to a next, and so on. I may have to run a new dedicated wire to that. It's only a 15 amp outlet, and I'd rather have a 20 amp for outside use.

I was greatly disappointed in one thing... when I looked back, in back of the panel before I decided to do all of this, I had seen a 'massive' amount of romex back there.

As it turned out, a lot of that romex were just 'loops', like the 6 or 7 wires going to the converter plug, and junction box under it.

When they go to those boxes then turn around and go back to the rear part of the panel again, then it's looking like 12 to 14 wires back there.

I was thinking that at least most things were probably home run, then combined in back of the panel. That doesnt seem to be so...

Like that bathroom groung fault. It's starting to look to me that a lot of the wiring was 'daisy chained' from one outlet to the next. I surely hope I can change that.

I'm tired of resetting clocks and things elsewhere in the coach. I mean even the outlets in the overhead cabinets gets killed from that bathroom ground fault.

I got one thing really bugging me, that I 'have to' try and figure out today.

I didn't heed that outlet under there for the old converter anymore, so I figured I would eliminate that mess.

There were two pieces of romex going in and out of there, (two pieces in and out of the junction box under that), so 'a lot' of romex going there, folding over and going back to all the others.

There was one piece of romex, (along with two others), that went toward the back of the cabinets. There was actually a wire tie around those three pieces of romex.

I figured thst I would use my little tone generator and tracer to find where this one wire went to. Thst didn't work at all! What I discovered was 'continuity' between the white and black wire!

That just did not make sense. I left that wire aside as it was getting late, and had to get the rest of the AC side done.

In fact it was getting so late, and dark, and cold, that I just wired everything up as fast as possible. I figured I can 'try' to make look 'pretty' today.

But it really bugs me! The wire goes to a route in back of the cabinets, with the two others.

I left the wire disconnected... I mran I was reading some kind of short on it. Well at least continuity.... I'll actually measure it today with my Fluke meter.

But the wire is disconnected, and everything is working in the coach.

Everything from the back of the cabinets, up to the two kitchen outlets, the overhead outlets above the sofa, all the way up to the outlet in the cabinet above the drivers seat.

And I can't put my tone generator on it, if there is continuity there. I didn't try putting my tone generator from the white or black to the ground wire yet. That I'll attempt today.

But I am on my 50 amp cable, everything seems to be working fine. At least I have my lighting, my television, and heater. In fact all my outlets and lights are working.

Still some circuits to trace out, outlets to change, new circuits to run, then 'maybe' extending those DC wires. So 'lots' to still do yet.

And I'm 'so sore' from yesterday's work, but I can't stop now. And when something is 'bugging me', I can't just sit still for it! I have to figure it out...

Supposed to be 70 degrees on Monday, (Yea!), I'll probably use that day for crawling around under the coach running my new circuits.

I did leave a lot of slack on the 50 amp cable for 'whatever' I have to do when I get a new transfer switch. And I've got the two romex csbles that went to the old switch set aside.

One is marked as 10 gauge, and believe that's the cable that goes to the generator, from the little diagram that was in the old switch.

Unfortunately, not all the romex cables are labeled as to what they are. Sometimes it's a bit difficult to determine 12 and 14 gauge.

I know Fleetwood is out of business, but still has a telephone number to contact them. I will call then today and see about that wiring diagram.

Thanks a lot for that thought! I hope they still have them.
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:25 AM   #31
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I posted this while you were posting yours so it may be outdated....

Wow. You have a big job ahead.

I hope your "extension" cable is heavy duty bulk cable similar to this:

Americord: 12/3 SOOW Black 90C 20 Amp 600V NA Heavy Duty Rubber Bulk Cable

Most circuits will be ok at 20A but if you have one where you could pull more than that, I would go with 10g wiring for that circuit. Even the ACs only require a 20A circuit to run. Of course those are dedicated for that purpose only. The key is the maximum draw on any circuit. Beakers are there for safety and should be rated both for the wire size and the amp draw.

Since your generator puts out 7KW, it should be 50A out: 1 30A and 1 20A circuits. That will be enough to power your coach when you get the ATS and install it. Plan ahead for that so it will be easier when you get around to doing it. Do the research on the wiring for an ATS so you will be prepared to make it work. You will need it when you decide that the generator might be useful (power outage, etc.). Big cables are harder to manipulate as you know so where/how you leave room to install the ATS is important.

Good luck today.
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Old 10-23-2014, 11:15 AM   #32
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Don't recall but do you have a surge protector or power conditioner to ensure you don't get screwed if the park you are at has a brown out or low/high voltage?

First 2 items I had installed in my RV was a surge protector and an automatic transfer switch. In my setup in order to use the generator I gad to plug the shore power cord into an outlet labeled generator that was in the same compartment. The auto transfer switch has the shore power and generator connected on inbound end and the breaker panel on the outbound end.

Just curious
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Old 10-23-2014, 12:06 PM   #33
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Ray took my primary question, that about a surge protector. You can find many stories here in iRV2 about RV's that did not use one and had to replace some or all electronics devices due to surge, or maybe an A/C due to low voltage. There are a couple brands that seem to be the majoprity suppliers, so do some research on those for future safety and peace of mind.

Also, The transfer switch (ATS) would usually be located in a utility compartment where the shore power line enters. It will have screw connections for the line in from the shore power (post), and from the generator. Line out will be to your breaker panel. This ATS automatically sends power to your breaker panel by sensing whether you have power coming from the post or from your generator. Your 2 A/C's will be on separate circuits for load balancing.

By the way, a surge protector can be wired so that it protects you from problems from the shore line and from the generator. But most seem to be wired for shore line protection.

If I were wiring, I would separate the outlets in the kitchen from the ones in the bath and bedroom. Each circuit would be controlled by a separate GFI. As you said, your outside outlet could also be on a separate GFI for your convenience and safety. The outlets in the living area could be on either GFI, considering anticipated loads, especially your heaters.

I would exercise your generator during the winter and also the furnaces. Be sure to start with a full propane tank...just in case. I don't know where you are located, but you don't want to turn into a popsicle during a hard freeze.

I would say your near-term priorities would be to acquire a surge protector and an ATS. I won't specify an order for those, but both are important. And of course, your heaters. We use a couple of cube heaters in our MH and rarely use the furnaces. And be sure they are tipover shutoff protected.

When I replaced my converter, most of the wires were too short. By putting the converter partially in place, I was able to make the connections without extending any wires...but not easily. While your idea of soldering and shrink-tubing those wires will likely work, I'm not sure that is code. Seems like I read something about no splices in hidden areas like in walls, etc.

Just my gut feeling, but I think your stranded wiring was a good idea. When I rewired the batteries in my golf cart, I was told to use welding cable rather than even an equal sized power wire because welding cable has many more strands and will therefore carry more current with less losses.

Good luck and stay warm.
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Old 10-23-2014, 12:29 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jb60 View Post
Okay, I'm confused about that part...
And for some reason this 'thread', (I guess it's called), got messed up a bit. Probably something I no doubt did...
But most of my replies aren't right under those who had written to me, like I guess it should be. And it looks like one got posted twice.
Maybe a nice moderator can fix all of this???
jb60
If you use the of the post you are replying to, (lower left of the post), and address your reply to the poster/author, (as I did to you), posts do not get "messed up" as easily.
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Old 10-24-2014, 01:21 AM   #35
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E=alilly;2281554]If using romex I would suggest "direct burial" type as it's waterproof whereas the house wiring type is not.

The flexible "extension cord" is best choice in my opinion.




As far as the transfer switch is concerned no. Neutral, 30a and 20a will be switched.

I would be leery of soldering connections for 120vac. Mechanical connections, if done right, are the way to go. Soldering and then using a wire nut will still allow the connection to come apart if the solder melts as the wire nut never had a chance to secure the connection. This is just my opinion.[/QUOTE]


In working on this new panel, I was remembered on how much I hate working with romex!

Especially the 20 amp... I mean it's all really stiff, and hard to work with, and naturally the larger the gauge, the stiffer it will be.

The direct burial would be... Well let's just say I'm sure my neighbors would hear me cussing up a storm! I didn't even want to consider using that.

And it's just hard to try and trim a panel neatly with romex.

I really like and prefer stranded wire. The outdoor rated extension cord has a nice thick, durable outer jacket on it, but yet is still flexible and easy to work with.

And again, wherever that wire might be exposed, I'll be putting plastic wire loom around it.

I'll feel confident and totally safe the way I'll be running my wire, otherwise I wouldn't be doing it.

A bit confused about the soldering comment... I still twist my wires together, then solder, then wire nut, then tape.

I don't see any possible way the connection would ever come apart.

I didn't get much work done today. At least nothing on the pannel. I kind-of got really pissed at myself.

When I was looking everything over, I missed something really important!

I found out why I didn't see large gauge, stranded wire from the old 30 amp cable feeding the buss bars in the old panel.

That 30 amp cable didn't even run up to the old panel!

I went outside to disconnect the old 30 amp cable, and get it out of the little storage compartment.

I had my 30 amp and the extra 50 amp cable stuffed in there. And that kind-of reminded me of something else I was pissed about...

I originally ordered a 50 foot, 50 amp cable. It was quite expensive! I figured about 20 feet to get up to the panel location, which would leave me a 30 foot pull-out to go to a pole connection.

Well that didn't work out as planned. By the time I ran the cable over to the frame, fished it all the way down the frame, then out of the frame to the panel location, and of course leaving some slack in there, I only have 'maybe' a 20 foot pull-out.

So if I ever change locations, I may have to buy a 50 amp extension cord.

Anyway, what got me down and depressed today was discovering 'why' that old 30 amp cable didn't run up to the old panel.

Thr 30 foot pull-out terminated into a metal, electrical junction box. It looked as if it followed a path through a wall, and forward.

Well today I discovered it didn't... From that junction box it was wire nutted to a piece of 10 gauge romex, that followed a path straight across the back of the coach, through a wall, no doubt going to the generator.

So it appears that the 30 amp cable goes to the generator first, 'then' up to the panel in romex.

The run of my 50 amp cable goes from the compartment, straight up to the panel.

So now I know what that piece of '10 gauge' romex was doing in the old panel.

I mean, it's not something I need to take out and start all over again. But it's going to involve running wires out to, and back from the genetator.

The generator transfer switch will still be mounted where the new panel is. And none of the existing wire will do me any good...

I was told by a tech at Parallax that I'll need 8 gauge wire, now that I've upgraded to 50 amp.

So if I'm understanding everything right, I'll have to run that 8 gauge wire to the generator, and then back from the genetator.

Now, I can cut the 50 amp cable in the little compartment, make a run over to the generator from there, then come back the same direction, and splice into my run up to the panel.

That would be a lot cheaper, as it would require less cable, (and a lot less crawling around under the coach).

I'll shorten my 50 amp cable even a bit more, but I figure at some point I may have to buy an extension cord anyway.

Either way, more cost, more work. I really wish I would had seen that before. At least it explains a lot of things to me now.

I seen a uTube video on a transfer switch, and checked out some other sites. I now have a much better understanding of a genetator transfer switch, and how it's wired.

So 'yea', the learning experience might have cost me a little more time and money, but I'm still 'way' far ahead of paying a shop to do this!

Thanks for following the thread, and for your comments.
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Old 10-27-2014, 07:53 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jb60 View Post

(snip...)

Thr 30 foot pull-out terminated into a metal, electrical junction box. It looked as if it followed a path through a wall, and forward.

Well today I discovered it didn't... From that junction box it was wire nutted to a piece of 10 gauge romex, that followed a path straight across the back of the coach, through a wall, no doubt going to the generator.

So it appears that the 30 amp cable goes to the generator first, 'then' up to the panel in romex.
jb60,

The 30' "pull-out"/10 gauge romex goes to the transfer switch, not the generator. The generator will also go into this switch. The output of the switch will be the 10 guage romex going forward.

You can splice the existing wire that runs from the generator to the transfer switch to the existing 10 gauge romex that runs from the transfer switch to your old breaker panel. You can save some money by "gutting" the old 30 amp transfer switch and using the box to do your splicing. That 10 gauge romex (old breaker box feed) will become the generator input to your new 50 amp transfer switch.

Working with solid conductor is a pain especially in a tight area and larger gauges. A good pair of round nose pliers is a plus.



Hang in there, seems like you are doing good...
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Old 10-28-2014, 11:23 AM   #37
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Hello

Quote:
Originally Posted by zzjea View Post
I posted this while you were posting yours so it may be outdated....

Wow. You have a big job ahead.

I hope your "extension" cable is heavy duty bulk cable similar to this:

Americord: 12/3 SOOW Black 90C 20 Amp 600V NA Heavy Duty Rubber Bulk Cable

Most circuits will be ok at 20A but if you have one where you could pull more than that, I would go with 10g wiring for that circuit. Even the ACs only require a 20A circuit to run. Of course those are dedicated for that purpose only. The key is the maximum draw on any circuit. Beakers are there for safety and should be rated both for the wire size and the amp draw.

Since your generator puts out 7KW, it should be 50A out: 1 30A and 1 20A circuits. That will be enough to power your coach when you get the ATS and install it. Plan ahead for that so it will be easier when you get around to doing it. Do the research on the wiring for an ATS so you will be prepared to make it work. You will need it when you decide that the generator might be useful (power outage, etc.). Big cables are harder to manipulate as you know so where/how you leave room to install the ATS is important.

Good luck today.

Thanks for following the thread.

The job continues! Yea, this has not been an easy task. Will probably take a break today, I'm so sore from the past two days of crawling around underneath the coach running wires.

My extension cord wire is a real heavy duty 12 gauge wire. Most of the circuits / outlets I plan on adding, will all be 20 amp.

I could have got away with 15 amp curcuits, but with electric heaters using 12.5 amps at 1500 watts, those outlets would be about useless for anything else.

One of the things that kind-of inspired me... I have a 15 amp outlet in the living room, which has an electric heater plugged into it, then a receiver and television.

If I run the heater on high, am say watching a DVD, which means naturally the television, then my receiver being on, I'll pop the 15 amp breaker.

So lately, I've only been able to run the heater on the lower 750 watt setting. I can run just the television and the heater on high, and not have a problem, but as soon as I add the receiver into the equation, I'll exceed that 15 amps.

I only use the receiver to drive a very small set of bookshelf type speakers. Among 'numerous' other issues, chemotherapy treatments I had a year back, robbed me of half my hearing.

So I'm considered hearing impared, and need those extra external speakers to be able to hear my movies.

I already blew out the first set of speakers in my big screen television. Was still under warranty so was able to get those replaced.

Out of warranty now, so can't afford to be replacing speakers all the time. The only resolution now are external speakers.

So anyway, that was just one of the things that set my mind towards this upgrage. Then the fact that it looks like I'm going to have to try and survive the winter here, I've got to have the ability to run more electric heaters in here.

I know most people do this so they can run both air conditioners at the same time, and yea, I'll be able to do that as well eventually.

Actually this past summer, I was able to get by on one air conditioner. It did get hot in here, like as much as 90, but that doesn't bother me as much as the cold does now.

Another 'gift' from the chemotherapy... a total intolerance to the cold. Especially in my hands and feet, where I suffered from a lot of nerve damage, (peripheral neuropathy).

So anyway again, the job continues. I've got about 99% of the wires run, and most of the crawling around the coach runing wires done.

I do have to get back under there to wrap some of the wiring in plastic wire loom. Don't know if I'm going to get that part of it done before winter hits. That may have to wait until spring.

I did make one run of a 14 gauge romex. That went to my water heater. I did the electric conversation to it, and think that was one of the best things I've done here.

Well, I did have a neighbor help me with that, as I was recently back from a hospital where I had to have hip replacement surgery after a fall.

The kit was only about $65.00 through amazon, and was extremely eazy to put in. When first looking at it, first reading the instructions, it looks complicated and overwhelming.

But the way the kit was designed, really anyone with some basic skills can do it. Well, as long as one isn't color blind... Just 'everything' in there is color coded. Just connect all the like colors together, and the electrical part of it is done.

And no stripping wires, no soldering, no wire nuts... everything has push together connectors on it.

The hardest part was attaching the thermostat to the actual metal part of the tank.

That involved removing a lot of screws, disconnecting the propane line, and pulling the tank part way out. Well, that's the way it was with mine... newer, or other models might be even easier.

'Anyway'... I'm a lot more concerned about that romex run, than I am about the extension cord wire I ran.

And despite someone's suggestion of using direct burial romex... Well, I didn't for this part of it.

I had some leftover 14 gauge romex in a box, had no other use for it, didn't even know if i had enough for that run until I actually uncoiled it.

Besides I didn't money left over to buy the direct burial kind... I figured 'whatever' I had, I was still going to put it in plastic wire loom anyway, so why waste what I already had.

This entire job has been a project! Even if I wasn't going to add any more circuits...

As I mentioned, all the DC wires are too short for the new panel. I'm not able to pull the panel completely out of the opening to work on it easily.

Splicing and extending all of them will probably be a winter project. I've got to get the new circuits done.

I've now got wires going from the panel to where the new extra outlets will be going. I just need to put the outlets in, then make the connections at the panel.

In the living room, on an outside wall, (where it won't be seen anyway), a surface mount box, with the wire ready for the outlet.

In the dinning room area, I'll be putting in a recessed outlet. There was a nice big hollow area in back of the dinning room 'booth'.

The wire actually came up through the floor in the storage area under the one bench seat. It's now sticking out of the wall waiting for the outlet that should be here today.

Then in the bedroom, (and I wish I would had found this sooner), I found a shallow box that I could recess in these narrow walls, and will still accommodate a standard outlet.

I did fish that wire up the wall so I could have the outlet at the standard height. It took a lot of measuring, looking at, 'this and that' to do that task!

I had to drill up from underneath, and where I was inside the narrow wall. And that wire is actually going up through one of my basement compartments.

There was only one good spot to put an outlet in that room, based on where I'd most likely be putting an electric heater. Though that might change... but if it does, it would only be by a couple feet.

When I completely removed the old panel, (labeling wires as I went along), the romex in that back was twisted, tangled, and what's often referred to as a 'rats nest'. It was like a bowl of spaghetti!

It took a lot of time just straightening that out. Especially with 'everything' in here being combined on 3 circuits.

I was able to split some of it up so far, but have a couple others to work on. One of the things I previously mentioned, was this ground fault outlet in the bathroon.

The outside outlet, (which isn't a ground fault yet... I will be changing that), was connected to that ground fault in the bathroom.

When something got wet outside, it naturally popped the ground fault in the bathroom. 'But', every other outlet in the coach was tied into that as well. So it killed 'everything' in the coach.

There's just no reason for that. So I was able to split some of that off, but still have some circuits to work on.

Then the other is splitting the two air conditioners off on their own circuits. That I have to think about, maybe post a question here.

Both are wired into a switch in an overhead compartment. I 'know' there's got to be a way of doing that without opening up a wall. Again, just have to think about that one.

Then I have to split the washer/dryer from the microwave. Those are switched in the kitchen right next to the microwave.

That one will be easy... I already know how I'm going to do that. It's going to involve crawling underneath and making one more short wire run.

One big challlenge I've run into, is the double floor. Something I completely didn't think about in the beginning.

I'd drill a 'small' hole, stick a straightened out coat hanger up the hole, then go looking for it. I bugged the hell out of me when I couldn't find it! Turns out I didn't go all the way through the second floor.

Then naturally, you've got to be 'real' careful where you're drilling a hole!

And this is going to be impossible to get to, but if I open my basement compartment where my srorage tanks are, I can see a bundle of wires, wire tied together, that's about 6 inches in diameter.

Television cable, low voltage wires, and romex, all tied together. Something that shouldn't be done...

There's no way to get to those wires, and is the only area where they can be seen. Everywhere else, they're inbetween the floors.

And I know that some of the things I still need to split apart, are running through that area. I just need to find an alternate way to split things up.

And I think I've pretty much got some of it figured out already. But that's not as important right now as getting these extra outlets in for extra heaters. So some of that might have to wait until spring time.

So the entire changeover, the way I want it to be, is going to be an ongoing project for some time. At least into the spring.

And I have that generator transfer switch to put in next spring as well. I figured the best way to do that already.

From the little compartment in the back, I'm going to split my 50 amp cable there, make a run to the generator from that point, (only about 8 feet away), then back again, and then I'll splice back to the 50 amp cable going up to the panel.

That way the genetator transfer switch can be installed up by the new panel, where the old one was.

Admittedly something I should had researched better before I started this project.

One thing I question, one company I called about the generator transfer switch told me I would have to use 8 gauge wire from the switch to the generator.

My 50 amp cable has three 6 gauge, and one 8 gauge wires in it. I'm thinking I'm going to have to make that run to the generator and back with 6 gauge wire.

Otherwise I really won't have 'true' 6 gauge wire feeding my panel.

Anyway, when it's all done, it will be nice, and in my mind, the way it should had been done.

One more quick note, there are 'a lot' of wires run under the coach. And I do mean 'a lot'!

However they are all run in plastic wire loom, and from the looks of it, the undercoating spray was put on after all that wire loom was installed under there.

Again, thanks for following the thread and for your input. I'm figuring when it's all done, I'll probably have about $1200 in the project.
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