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Old 04-13-2013, 09:46 PM   #1
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Heat build up on tires

I have read some people will use one of those temperature guns to measure the temperature of their tires between rest stops. What is a safe temperature and how does the hot summer roads effect your readings. What I am really looking for is an explanation of how you use this info.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:02 PM   #2
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I used to do that, but now I just trust my SmarTire system. But when I did, I mainly was checking to make sure no one tire was significantly hotter than the rest. Which would indicate low pressure. Just be aware that inside duals will be hotter than the outside duals, and that the tires on the sunny side will be hotter than the tires on the shady side.

If they're all 100-120, you're probably good. If one is 180, you might have a problem.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:16 PM   #3
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Thanks FD, good explaination.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:22 PM   #4
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I use the IR temperature gun. When I stop, rest area or fuel, I check the tire temp on the sidewall below the edge of the tread. I mainly look for all the temps to be about the same. Often the tires on the sun side are 10+ degrees higher. Temps run about 100-115 in cool weather and up to 125 in hot weather. New blacktop on a 100+ day has had my temps around 130.
I think differences in tires, weight, pressures, speed and surface would make the "normal" temperature vary between motorhomes. After you check the temps for a while you more or less know what to expect.

If one tire is 20-25 degrees or more higher, (my number) I would try to determine why.
IR Temp is also good to check wheel hubs and air conditioner output, holding tank temps, etc.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:32 PM   #5
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I started doing that here lately for several reasons. They run about 10-20* hotter than the pavement. Sometimes even the sun side will run a few degrees warmer than the shade side. Plus it gives me (makes me) walk around the coach and trailer to eyeball the entire rig to give it the once over, plus stretch things out while the DW is walking the chog.

One time at a rest area a family in a Class C pulling in beside us and the lady asked what I was doing. I told her checking temps because if one/some are hot you've got a problem. Well they were having the trip from hell, had a inner blow out the previous day and most likely from improper maintenance and age. I shot the other side and the other inner was quite a bit hotter, I suggested they take it easy and have it checked sooner than later. Hubby showed up and apparently didn't like me doing his job or bus envy. Commanded his family back in the vehicle.

We loaded up and I was speculating to the DW that we'd be seeing them down the road sometime today. They passed us like we were going backwards. About ten minutes later they were on the side of the road with another blow out.

I figure if I check at each stop, every couple of hours the older I get, I hope I'll see little trends/changes at convenient times than big changes at inconvenient times.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:34 PM   #6
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Couldn't have said it better. Saved me a bunch of typing.
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Old 04-13-2013, 10:34 PM   #7
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Hooligan, Why holding tank temp?
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Old 04-14-2013, 06:10 AM   #8
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Bridgestone Commercial Truck Tires

Per the Tire Doctor the delta is 60 degrees F from ambient after one hour of operation.

This is measuring at the tread if using an IR gun.

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Old 04-14-2013, 06:38 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charliej View Post
I have read some people will use one of those temperature guns to measure the temperature of their tires between rest stops. What is a safe temperature and how does the hot summer roads effect your readings. What I am really looking for is an explanation of how you use this info.
just a gadget gary trying to look like they are acquiring data. In reality... without the proper tool (tire pyrometer) and knowing the exact weight and having a control tire... its just silliness for a road tire anyways.

If one found a tire to be significantly "hotter" than others... its because they failed to properly check the pressures before the trip.

Your time and effort is better spent on using a quality air gauge or as mentioned... a tps system.
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Old 04-14-2013, 06:40 AM   #10
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Nice to know I have been beeping my IR on the right targets and seeing the right temps.
Works for checking coffee temp too
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:09 AM   #11
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just a gadget gary trying to look like they are acquiring data. In reality... without the proper tool.
..............

Well, maybe WeatherTodd is correct. I certainly don't have the know-it-all to argue, but it just makes me feel good to be able to check tire heat when I check the wheel hubs on my FW. I bought a temp gun primarily to measure the hubs because I do know that a hot running hub is indicative of a bearing or brake problem. As others have indicated, what you're looking for is a differential temp on one surface.
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:21 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by ralphie View Post
..............

Well, maybe WeatherTodd is correct. I certainly don't have the know-it-all to argue, but it just makes me feel good to be able to check tire heat when I check the wheel hubs on my FW. I bought a temp gun primarily to measure the hubs because I do know that a hot running hub is indicative of a bearing or brake problem. As others have indicated, what you're looking for is a differential temp on one surface.

Sorry but my attitude about things like that is you dont have "failures for no reason". This comes from spending many summers at a parkway gas station and a enthusiastic interest in mechanics. Most problems have exhibited themselves prior to the catastrophic end. (excluding blowouts)

Most failures are from neglect. Whether its long or short term, doesn't really matter. The problem is these days... finding a good mechanic that can properly diagnose/inspect a vehicle is very difficult.
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Old 04-14-2013, 07:56 AM   #13
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Next time you are at a flying J to fuel, walk in there and spend 10 bucks on a tire Bump Stick and then walk out to the RV you are fueling up and hit the tires in the center of the thread and listen for the sound. After doing this bit and over time you will know what to listen for. I made mine out of a 1" dowel and a piece of 1" strap metal, along with a hammer..........easy and cheap.......

As for the hubs bend down and touch them with a finger for the best results......All that heatgun is a waste of money in my opinion........

Mike
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Old 04-14-2013, 08:05 AM   #14
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Next time you are at a flying J to fuel, walk in there and spend 10 bucks on a tire Bump Stick and then walk out to the RV you are fueling up and hit the tires in the center of the thread and listen for the sound. After doing this bit and over time you will know what to listen for. I made mine out of a 1" dowel and a piece of 1" strap metal, along with a hammer..........easy and cheap.......

As for the hubs bend down and touch them with a finger for the best results......All that heatgun is a waste of money in my opinion........

Mike
IR, about 30 bucks. Accurate: Reads my body temp within .2 degrees. Fast, simple. But I did use a 4 oz ball peen for years.
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