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Old 06-25-2015, 11:46 AM   #29
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... my question to you is why are you so concerned about making a right turn on red rather than just waiting for the next green light? .....
Who said anything about making right turns on red? My example specifically spoke about making a left turn. My mention of "right turn on red" was in reference to the impact that such turns have on reducing the number/size of gaps in traffic for vehicles trying to enter traffic "downstream" from a light where "right on red" is allowed.

In my situation - the only street exiting my subdivisions turns out onto a 5 lane road (2 northbound lanes, 2 southbound lanes and a turn lane between them). The 5 lane road has a posted speed limit of 45 miles per hour. There are traffic lights (on the 5 lane road) roughly 1/4 mile north and 1/4 mile south of where the street exiting my sub turns onto the 5 lane road. Both of the "lighted" intersections similar 5 lane roads. There are retail establishments on both sides of the 5 lane road between the light to my north.

Between the traffic coming from the north straight thru the light, the traffic that enters the road from the east-west road to my north (one group via the "left turn arrow signal" ... followed by a stream of cars making a "right on red" ... plus cars exiting the retail establishments - means there is virtually always a steady stream of southbound traffic. Turning left from my subdivision means dealing with omnipresent southbound traffic AND a relatively constant stream of northbound traffic ... while trying to get the coach across 3 of the 5 lanes. Turning right doesn't solve the problem when my destination is north - since turning right takes me deeper into a large area of retail establishments with no good route for turning back north.

I've sat for as long as 5 minutes - waiting for a gap in traffic large enough to allow me to safely make a turn out of my subdivision (.... while the ire of my neighbors stuck behind me was no doubt rising).

It's bad enough in a passenger car (which typically has enough acceleration to make use of a much smaller gap in traffic). My 60+ foot motor home and toad combination ... not so much. This is why I commented on the coach's ability to "accelerate".
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Old 06-26-2015, 11:09 AM   #30
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What I have done in similar situations is to turn right and then make a left u-turn if possible or turn left onto a cross street and go around the block to have a right turn onto the road you wanted to turn left on. When I am pulling our trailer, we are 75' long. It's sometimes easier and safer to do the above than to wait for an opening.

Edit: Regarding the lack of acceleration, a turbo charged diesel needs a lot of air to build power. At idle the turbo is spinning very slow. It rely's on the exhaust flow to spool up to the speed needed to develop more power to pull away from a stop. All turbo-ed diesels have a "turbo-lag" which is what you are feeling as a lack of acceleration. As you have found, it requires a different approach when pulling into traffic. Once it comes up to speed, you can feel that power building.
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Old 06-26-2015, 11:29 AM   #31
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docj, I agree 100% with you. I have had a CDL for too many years to remember and have always thought that people new to driving a large motorhome, especially a DP, should be required to have a CDL or similar class to become more familiar with the change needed to operate one safely. There are those who will disagree, but what harm is there in being more informed and aware of what can happen and how to avoid a problem or how to deal with it?
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Old 06-26-2015, 02:25 PM   #32
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A Cat C9 400 hp is pushing our 40 ft bath and a half down the road. We get 7.6 towing and that includes generator use. Without the toad we get 8 mpg but I found you can really improve that if you remove the lead foot... We pull the mountains in the west easily weighing in at 34000 plus the toad.


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Old 06-26-2015, 06:10 PM   #33
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Hi folks. Ignore horsepower, torque is what hauls the mail. Weights can be all over the map for a 40', but 32,000 is fairly typical. 950 lbs torque will pull it just fine.
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Old 06-26-2015, 06:51 PM   #34
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Hi folks. Ignore horsepower, torque is what hauls the mail. Weights can be all over the map for a 40', but 32,000 is fairly typical. 950 lbs torque will pull it just fine.

Horsepower is calculated from measured torque. Torque is the twisting force that gets a load rolling but make no mistake, it's horsepower which pulls that long grade in 4th or 5th gear at 45-55 mph. Torque can be multiplied by the transmission but horsepower is what it is.


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Old 06-27-2015, 01:22 AM   #35
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We have a CAT 330, 330 hp and 860 lb/ft of torque... 31,000 lbs fully loaded and we slow down on long grades of greater than 5%... Just starting to tow a modified Jeep Wrangler...about 4100lbs... I can tell it is back there, but no hills yet.
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Old 06-27-2015, 09:49 AM   #36
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Horsepower is calculated from measured torque. Torque is the twisting force that gets a load rolling but make no mistake, it's horsepower which pulls that long grade in 4th or 5th gear at 45-55 mph. Torque can be multiplied by the transmission but horsepower is what it is.
I agree, Steve, but it's torque that gives you the "oomph" to get off the line quickly. It's like when we were much, much younger; my '66 Mustang with its 289 small block V-8 had nearly as much HP as my dad's Galaxy with its rugged 352 (for the youngsters, that's not the same as the 351C or 351W engines). But that trusty old modified truck engine had enough torque to "kick" you off the line when the light turned green. My Mustang couldn't duplicate that.

The 1550 lb-ft of torque in my MH enables it to merge onto freeways in an almost car-like manner. On straightaways it loafs along at ~1200 rpm and even on the steepest grades it only runs at its max HP point which is ~1600-1700 rpm.

If you look at it from a physics perspective, torque governs the "rate of change of angular velocity" which means that it enables a rotating shaft (the driveshaft) to increase its speed in a shorter period of time. This then results in faster acceleration for the vehicle the driveshaft is attached to. Torque is the rotational analog of force and just like more force results in faster acceleration, more torque results in faster change in shaft rotation rate.
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Old 06-27-2015, 12:12 PM   #37
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Torque is Force. Force over distance is Work. Work over Time is Power, as in Horsepower.
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Old 06-27-2015, 01:21 PM   #38
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Horsepower/torque for 40'

Lets make it simple. A 400 horsepower gas engine will generally have 400-500 lbs. of torque. It can only haul about 25,000 lbs and then very weakly. Take a 400 hp ISL diesel for instance, and it will have 1200 lbs. of torque, and be able to haul over 40,000 lbs. Same horsepower, different torque, way different pulling power.
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Old 06-27-2015, 10:53 PM   #39
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We have a CAT 330, 330 hp and 860 lb/ft of torque... 31,000 lbs fully loaded and we slow down on long grades of greater than 5%... Just starting to tow a modified Jeep Wrangler...about 4100lbs... I can tell it is back there, but no hills yet.

What Transmission do you have?
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Old 06-27-2015, 11:29 PM   #40
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We have a 45-ft 4 slide coach that weighs approximately 52,000 pounds with our toad. It has a Detroit Series 60 rated at 525HP and 1650 foot pound of torque. We normally drive 65mph and average 6.0mpg. Kicking the speed up to 75 drops the mileage to approximately 5.0mpg.
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Old 06-28-2015, 02:34 PM   #41
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I'm 40' with a 8.9 ltr Cummins rated at 350hp & 1080 ft lbs of torque. My coach weight loaded is 30,450 lbs with a toad weight of 4300 lbs. GCW is 34,750 lbs. I rarely have to downshift on grades. I put the Allison in economy mode and leave it there. I average 8.5 mpg running at a steady 1800 rpm (62mph/100kph). Could I use a little more power? Sure, and I've thought about having the ECM reflashed to 400hp. It would give me another 200 ft lbs of torque, but the ISL engine is a workhorse. So I have no complaints. Just note that most all these engines live at 1800 rpm for power and mileage.
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Old 06-28-2015, 04:23 PM   #42
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400 HP Cummins ISL in a 42-foot, 34,000 pound coach. No complaints on performance. She'll maintain 70 mph on all but the steepest interstate highway grades.

Fuel mileage is about 8 mpg coach only and 7.5 mpg towing the Grand Cherokee.


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Your coach is light for a 42', but maintaining 70mph on lets say even a 5% grade ........ C'mon !!!!
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