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Old 01-03-2008, 04:22 PM   #1
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Is any MH manufacturer planing to build a hybrid MH. It seems the industry needs to look toward more fuel efficiency if they want to survive and thrive. Diesel/electric could be an alternative.
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Old 01-03-2008, 04:22 PM   #2
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Is any MH manufacturer planing to build a hybrid MH. It seems the industry needs to look toward more fuel efficiency if they want to survive and thrive. Diesel/electric could be an alternative.
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Old 01-03-2008, 05:29 PM   #3
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The technology is there. Seattle (Metro Transit) has some hybrid (diesel electric) buses. These are double length, articulated buses and must weigh as much as a big motorhome. Don't know the manufaturer but it can be done. Cost might be a big issue.
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Old 01-03-2008, 06:19 PM   #4
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In th Jan 08 issue of RVXTREME, there is a blurb about Coachmen RV displaying a "green RV." I remember reading something about another company that I hadn't heard of before producing a hybrid...I forget the company and the source.
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Old 01-03-2008, 06:20 PM   #5
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The Seattle hybrid busses weigh 44,000 lbs empty and cost $645,000 each with a volume purchase discount. They cost $200,000 more than a standard diesel bus. The batteries sit on the roof.

In actual operation the hybrid busses are getting 3.8 mpg while the older diesel busses are averaging 4.0 mpg. So the hybrid cost $200,000 more and gets lower fuel mileage. Tests showed the hybrid is more fuel efficient from 1-14 mph and the standard diesel bus gets better fuel mileage above 14 mpg.

A hybrid takes 23.3 seconds to accelerate from 0 to 40 MPH and has a top speed of just over 65 mph.

I don't think we'll see the hybrid in motorhomes.
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Old 01-03-2008, 06:25 PM   #6
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Locomotives are often electric powered. Yes they are powered by diesel generators but the point is, if the electrics can haul all that weight, obviously something similar could be done. The cost however will probably be prohibitive.
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Old 01-04-2008, 06:56 AM   #7
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Diesel-electric is practical for motorhomes as it is for locomatives, but locomotives do not try to run off batteries part of the time. The deisel engine is simply a huge generator that continuously powers the electric drive. Electric motors are great for trains - they have almost infinite torque and trains need that more than anything else. Imagine trying to start a 50 car train from a dead stop!

Hybrids are different than diesel-electric. Hybrids attempt to use battery powered motors only part of the time (or as an assist to the engine) and the internal combustion engine the rest of the time. The engine alternator recharges the batteries but otherwise drives the wheels directly.

Fuel cells may ultimately be the solution for large vehicles, but the technology still hasn't reached everyday use capability. Providing the hydrogen fuel across the USA is one of the stumbling blocks.
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Old 01-04-2008, 08:47 AM   #8
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Providing the hydrogen fuel across the USA is one of the stumbling blocks. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I recently saw a TV program that showed stand alone hydrogen fuel stations in Norway. They indicated that the hydrogen is produced at each station thereby eliminating the need for large, centralized plants like our current gasoline refineries.
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Old 01-04-2008, 02:36 PM   #9
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"I recently saw a TV program that showed stand alone hydrogen fuel stations in Norway. They indicated that the hydrogen is produced at each station thereby eliminating the need for large, centralized plants like our current gasoline refineries."

And there is the reason I think it will take a long time before you see hydrogen vehicles in this country. The stand alone stations are not what big oil wants to see. There are already some people in the us that are running their cars or trucks on hydrogen that they are producing for themselves. The technology to produce hydrogen is pretty basic and fairly easy to do. If the auto makers started making cars that ran on hydrogen I don't think it would be too long before you and I were making our own fuel to run them on. The main source for hydrogen is water- we all already have that piped into our homes! In the Wisconsin State Journal today there was an article in the auto section about a GM hydrogen powered concept vehicle that they are going to display at a trade show to see public reaction. It was a good looking vehicle that I think would be popular with the public. But again, will it ever be built for the public to purchase and use?
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Old 01-04-2008, 04:28 PM   #10
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Easyrider:

But again, will it ever be built for the public to purchase and use?

Not unless Exxon-Mobil et al have control of all the world water supply.

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Old 01-04-2008, 06:51 PM   #11
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Capitalism at its best?
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Old 01-04-2008, 07:16 PM   #12
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Hydrogen production requires a lot of electricity. All your really doing is moving the energy source to electricity. For hydrogen to be a feasable source of energy, science must find a cheaper method to produce it.
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Old 01-05-2008, 09:11 AM   #13
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"Hydrogen production requires a lot of electricity. All your really doing is moving the energy source to electricity. For hydrogen to be a feasable source of energy, science must find a cheaper method to produce it."

Science has found the way, nuclear power. It is the political will to face reality that is the problem.

Research information on EXPO 74 which was held in Spokane, WA in 1974 and hydrogen fuel exhibit which was part of it. The technology for a hydrogen fuel based transportation system has been available for years.
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Old 01-05-2008, 01:07 PM   #14
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Originally posted by Norm Payne:

"The Seattle hybrid busses weigh 44,000 lbs empty and cost $645,000 each with a volume purchase discount. They cost $200,000 more than a standard diesel bus. The batteries sit on the roof.

In actual operation the hybrid busses are getting 3.8 mpg while the older diesel busses are averaging 4.0 mpg. So the hybrid cost $200,000 more and gets lower fuel mileage. Tests showed the hybrid is more fuel efficient from 1-14 mph and the standard diesel bus gets better fuel mileage above 14 mpg."

I am glad we are so "Green" in Seattle with these expensive buses that use more fuel?????

One of the reasons they have them is for the bus tunnel in downtown. They used to have diesel buses with a separate electric motor and overhead electric wires to run in the tunnel. They for some reason switched to a more expensive, heavier, less fuel efficient bus. Our tax money at work. Maybe this is why we just voted down a $20 billion transportation proposal!
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