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Old 10-04-2013, 11:58 AM   #1
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Is it best to leave air in or out for winter storage?

Got a Monaco dp with air. Is it best to dump air or not and how best to avoid flat spotting tires?
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Old 10-04-2013, 12:03 PM   #2
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There are varying opinions and practices on this.

I dump the air and lower the jacks enough to take the bulk of the weight off of the tires. If you're going to be stored for a long time, it's also a good idea to place plywood under each tire so it isn't resting on concrete.

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Old 10-04-2013, 12:24 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickO View Post
There are varying opinions and practices on this.

I dump the air and lower the jacks enough to take the bulk of the weight off of the tires. If you're going to be stored for a long time, it's also a good idea to place plywood under each tire so it isn't resting on concrete.

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X2 Exactly what I do!
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Old 10-04-2013, 02:04 PM   #4
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There are varying opinions and practices on this.

I dump the air and lower the jacks enough to take the bulk of the weight off of the tires. If you're going to be stored for a long time, it's also a good idea to place plywood under each tire so it isn't resting on concrete.

Rick
I was going to move it back and forth once a month out of the warehouse but what is the issue with concrete?
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Old 10-04-2013, 02:10 PM   #5
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Hi 1gershwin,
It is personal preference on removing weight from the tires. There is no right or wrong. If you have Michelin tires they will not flat spot.

Consider letting the engine "sleep" during the period of storage. Unless you are going to drive the coach to get all automotive components up to operating temp, one can do more harm than good.

The problem with long term storage on concrete is the concrete can "suck/dry" the moisture/chemicals out of the tire, where it is touching the concrete. I use thin plastic sheets for the tires to set on.
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Old 10-04-2013, 02:17 PM   #6
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I was going to move it back and forth once a month out of the warehouse but what is the issue with concrete?
What Gary said.

If you're going to be moving the coach monthly, drive it around for an hour or so with the gennie running... or don't move it at all. They don't like being started for a short time and then put back to bed.

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Old 10-04-2013, 08:30 PM   #7
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Absolutely, the rule is IF you are not going to use, or drive the coach then let it sleep. As for wood , I would choose rubber pads like those spld for horse stalls at Tractor Supply. Wood draws moisture.
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Old 10-05-2013, 07:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickO View Post
There are varying opinions and practices on this.

I dump the air and lower the jacks enough to take the bulk of the weight off of the tires. If you're going to be stored for a long time, it's also a good idea to place plywood under each tire so it isn't resting on concrete.

Rick
This is what I do, too.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:12 PM   #9
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I agree with the others above:
- dump the suspension air (it likely will leak down over time anyway)
- put the jacks down to take part of the load off the tires
- put plastic or rubber under the tires, and
- don't start the engine unless you drive it for at least 30 minutes at highway speed.

I used some plastic pads under my tires for years until they started to break up, and recently bought a stall mat at Tractor Supply and cut individual tire pads from it.
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:48 AM   #10
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Thank you for all the suggestions! Especially the tip on the pads and letting the engine sleep.
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Old 10-06-2013, 02:05 PM   #11
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If you start up the engine at least bring it up to operating temp and if you start up the generator put it under at least a 50% load for a half hour.
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