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Old 12-25-2013, 01:50 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flanagan View Post
Our motorhome is a 2008 Winnebago 35J. We bought it used. There is an unused tire in the tire storage compartment. The tire space looks to be the perfect size for installing AGM batteries, solar charger, and inverter. I have no equipment for changing a 19.5" tire and the tire itself is 6 years old. Do I really need it? New tires are in the budget before we go full time next year. Isn't slime and a compressor enough to get me rolling in the event of a flat?
Get new tires, dump the spare, get an ERS plan, do your battery/solar/inverter stuff, and relax. A 19.5 does not cost that much and you will be on new tires. The worst thing it can cost you is MAYBE some time. That, against the odds of a flat, would make the issue moot for me.

I dont have room for a spare. If I did, my DW would claim it.

Happy trails!
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:45 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by vsheetz View Post
The time factor is definitely a consideration. If I fave a spare, in a couple hours I will be on the road again. Without a spare, it can potentially be a better part of a day or more.

Again as I commented, its a personal decide. Pros and cons either way.
I would side with those that say carry a spare for safety and convenience. You may have trouble when it's least convenient for both you and the road service company. If you have a spare it doesn't take that long to change it, and you don't have to depend on someone dispatching a knowledgeable and reliable service person.

One other thing about putting Slime or any other similar product in a tire. In some cases it will get you where you need to go. Keep in mind however that no tire manufacturer will warranty a tire that has been filled with the stuff, and very few shops will attempt to repair one that has been injected with it. About all it might do is get you from point A to point B. After that you'll still have to find a new tire to replace the damaged one.
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Old 12-25-2013, 08:16 PM   #17
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We stopped carrying spares on the semi trucks over twenty years ago, when we switched from tube type to tubeless tires. We never have blowouts any more and they have 18 tires on every rig. If we get a flat on any drive or trailer tire, we just limp into town on the other dual tire. If we were to have a steer tire flat, we would just pull a tire off of one of the trailer duals and put it on the steer. I run the same on the trailers as the steer so they even match. I would do the same on the MH if it came down to it. Then just limp in slow on one drive tire on one side. On nothing but Goodyear tires. Been running them for over 20 years now on the semi trucks. And the MH came with GY tires. If I ever change them I will put truck tires on it and get rid of the RV type tires that are on it. It does not hurt a tubeless tire to run it flat along side a good tire in a dual setup. Just drive slow and take it easy.
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Old 12-26-2013, 08:52 AM   #18
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It does not hurt a tubeless tire to run it flat along side a good tire in a dual setup. Just drive slow and take it easy.
I have been told countless times by tire experts to never run a single tire in a dual setup. The single tire is carrying almost twice the design weight of the tire.
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:18 AM   #19
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I have been told countless times by tire experts to never run a single tire in a dual setup. The single tire is carrying almost twice the design weight of the tire.
This is to just limp into a tire shop, at a slow speed. Seen it done countless times. The tire guys always ask, is it on the inside or outside, they love outside flats, as they just lay down a piece of 2X12 on the ground and have you drive the inside tire up on that, then fix the flat. No jack needed, and you drive off when the outside is fixed. This is a very common practice and used everyday in the trucking industry. We drive all our flat tires, to a repair shop. Unless its a steer tire. Some experts talk too much!
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:44 AM   #20
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old spare tire

My 2005 MH that I bought used last year has an unmounted spare in a storage bay. The date on this tire is 2005. So it was from the original set of tires and is about 9 years old. What condition would this tire be in even as a spare if the ERS would mount it if need be.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:02 AM   #21
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My 2005 MH that I bought used last year has an unmounted spare in a storage bay. The date on this tire is 2005. So it was from the original set of tires and is about 9 years old. What condition would this tire be in even as a spare if the ERS would mount it if need be.
A 9 year old tire probably wouldn't make a good permanent replacement for a damaged tire. It would however allow you to get off the road and not be pressured to immediately purchase a tire from the road service that may not be compatible with the tires currently on your motorhome. The "7 year rule of thumb" isn't written in stone. Many tire manufacturers recommend inspection and replacement "as needed".

Keep in mind most of the tires that come with new cars are only rated for a distance of 50 miles@ speeds under 50mph. Once again the object isn't to provide a permanent replacement , but rather an interim solution to the problem at hand.

Road services may have their merits, but they don't cover many out of the way areas. Try finding someone to come out and change a tire on a weekend out in the boonies. When we were on a caravan to Alaska a few years ago a couple people had tire problems. Neither were able to get service in a timely manner. One was advised to "just drive it over to the shop" (20 miles away), and the second was told "we'll be there as soon as possible". It turned 'as soon as possible was going to be the next day".

If you feel comfortable spending time on the side of the road "hoping" the road service will get to you in a timely manner AND have the size and brand tire you need don't bother with a spare. If you're not so confident that will happen then take one with you.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:57 AM   #22
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I think the poster meant it was okay to go a short distance of a few miles to get to a safe place or repair shop. I know for a fact that is the normal way of doing it!!!!!!!
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Old 12-26-2013, 01:03 PM   #23
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limpin with spare

Quote:
Originally Posted by KSCRUDE View Post
This is to just limp into a tire shop, at a slow speed. Seen it done countless times. The tire guys always ask, is it on the inside or outside, they love outside flats, as they just lay down a piece of 2X12 on the ground and have you drive the inside tire up on that, then fix the flat. No jack needed, and you drive off when the outside is fixed. This is a very common practice and used everyday in the trucking industry. We drive all our flat tires, to a repair shop. Unless its a steer tire. Some experts talk too much!
I appreciate what you're saying about limping in with a flat on a dual. In a truck. I've done that my self. In most motor homes though, are not constructed like commercial trucks and trailers (made mostly of steel) There's plastic and fiberglass fender wells and boy does a blown tire take that stuff out fast. Guess if it "Just flat" you might limp a few miles but if the tire starts to disintegrate-- well then you're back to tearing out plastic parts. I blew a front motor home tire once. Before I could get stopped It took part of the fiberglass side wall out and tore out some other plastic and steel parts inside the fender well.

So as some have said the best hope of not having that happen is to have tires younger than 6 years old and pressure monitoring system helps to identify a problem while driving down the road. I don't have the pressure monitoring system so I do the air pressure check with a gauge each morning and if I stop- do a thorough visual of the tires -- usually need the walk anyway.

So this is what I learned,
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:25 AM   #24
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Murphy's law:

If you carry a spare you will never need it.

If you don't carry a spare you will need it.

I carry a spare and have never needed it after 183,000 miles(knock on wood).
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Old 12-28-2013, 11:06 AM   #25
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Murphy's law:

If you carry a spare you will never need it.

If you don't carry a spare you will need it.

I carry a spare and have never needed it after 183,000 miles(knock on wood).
What is stated here is probably true-- but if you happen to travel with a group and some one has a similar rig as yours -- they might be helped out sometime with your spare. Never know?
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Old 12-28-2013, 07:19 PM   #26
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Short video on having a spare.
Sometimes an RV spare tire is not necessary. Here's why - YouTube
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Old 12-28-2013, 11:06 PM   #27
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I only have 16 inch on mine so My situation is different than most.but a lot of the areas I travel in cell phone service is spotty or non exist for several miles So if I lose a steer tire I'm stranded.
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:52 AM   #28
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...We bought road service with our insurance but my main concern is availability of a 22.5 tire if one blows. Just installed 2 new Toyos on the front and would like to carry one of the old ones just in case...
barryb
That's my thinking too. If one blows, I've got one road service can mount to get me to where I can get a new one.
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