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Old 05-30-2014, 03:36 PM   #43
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As for turning the dates inward where you can not see them...

Standard practice when mounting tires on rims is to put the rim so the highest part is in the center and then mount the tire so the date is up.

On the front tires the "Hub" sticks out past the tire, so the date is visible, ON the REAR, however, the inner tire is mounted that way but the OUTER is mounted ... the other way around, so the dates are visible only if you are BETWEEN the tires... It is simply how they are mounted. No conspiricy,, On your car, mounting that way they would ball be on the outside, but duals are a special case.
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Old 05-31-2014, 01:29 AM   #44
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manufacturing plant code and chalk test

The manufacturing plant code is part of the DOT number on the tires, and is the first two alpha/numeric characters (after the letters "DOT"). This will probably be expanded to 3 characters as more plants are built/utilized. For example, the DOT code on the cooper discoverer H/T's on my truck right now read DOT UT11 1BH 1712. Dissecting that code, the "UT" is the code for the Cooper plant in Texarkana, Arkansas. Tire DOT Plant Codes – Sorted by Plant Code - Tire Safety Group lists all the plant codes, and appear to be relatively accurate. I'm guessing the Hercules are from China, but there's nothing necessarily wrong with that. Pirelli, Goodyear, and all sorts of other brand name "good" tires have models made in china. It all depends on the quality and controls at the manufacturing plant. I've heard really bad things about "carlisle" brand tires, and those are a chinese made brand. Heard nothing but good things about "double coin" trailer tires, and those are also chinese made.
The "11" in the DOT code is a size code. Not sure why they put that on there, there's no real standard and the manufacturer can use any characters they want as long as they can explain what it means. The Rubber Manufacturer's Assoc guide says "11" in a light truck tire means 245/75 16 which matches my current tire size.
The next four characters is whatever the manufacturer wants to put there... lot number, model number or revision of the model, doesn't matter except when you call them for a warranty claim they may ask for the whole code.
The last 4 is the date code in "Week week year year" format as you already know.
<break>
Basically a chalk test is marking a thick line laterally across the tire with white chalk, and driving straight and slow for 100 feet or so and then inspecting the chalk line on the tire shows you where the "contact patch" of the tire is. Too much pressure and the center of the tire has lost a significant amount of chalk and the inside/outside edges appear untouched or barely touched. Under-inflation shows the opposite. The test is furthered by loading the tires down and driving at cruising speed for XX miles and checking pressure to see if your within the 10-15% above "cold" pressure range.
With the Hercules H-901 and any "commercial" tire (ie, 17.5, 19.5, 22.5 diameters) made with steel sidewall belts, there should be a minimum inflation pressure so you don't over flex the sidewall and weaken the steel belt which can cause a pretty explosive "zipper tear" in the tire that would ruin anyone's day/life/ability to look attractive to women. Any commercial tire that is deflated 20% for the weight it is carrying should be inspected by someone that knows what they're looking at prior to being re-inflated (if not the tire brand dealer, the dealer can ship it off to where it can be inspected).
Hercules couldn't give me a minimum tire pressure for the H-901's and recommended I use the truck manufacturer's recommendations found on the door (BAD idea for a commercial tire that can fit on a light truck). 80 PSI might be the lowest minimum safe pressure. TOYO told me for their 215/75R17.5's I was investigating that they don't recommend anything below 70 PSI. The H-901 has a significantly higher sidewall than a 17.5" tire, so I might try 75 PSI , or maybe even 70. I'm just guessing as I have nothing concrete or scientific to base that on, and a blowout on a steer tire is not something I'd like to experience.
Attached is the load inflation table from Hercules (ignore the 1st table as that's for "ST" tires, skip straight to the LT 235/85R16 line on the 2nd table), as well as an example of scale weight from my truck/5ver combo. Weigh your rig at a truck stop (costs about $10-$15) with your front tires one of the scale platforms and your rear tires on the platform behind that (the scales are actually 3 or 4 separate scales so you can weigh each axle group separately, but yet all at the same time). All weights are on the printout. You can adjust your pressures accordingly (BUT keep in mind minimum recommended pressure, and DO NOT adjust tire pressure at the truck stop unless they're too low. Tires heat up and are no longer at "COLD" pressure after only a few miles of driving and take 4 hours to get back to "cold" pressure. Best wait until morning so the tires aren't affected by heat from the sun on one side of the rig). Lastly, it's not horrible to slightly over-inflate the tires on an RV (not above MAX tire pressure stamped on the side of the tire, but above the recommendation for the weight they're carrying) as RV tires should be replaced every 5 years since they typically dry rot (ie, side wall crack) before wearing out due to the low mileage your average RV travels yearly.
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Originally Posted by TriMoot View Post

PortSider: Not sure how to gather manufacturers code off the tires, can you help me there? Also, VERY little miles on the tires. We took them over to Idaho, probably about 60 miles (120 RT) so far so can't really tell, but like I said earlier, it seems to corner better during in town driving and on the highway they roll right along with very little road noise. And again, my head feels much better. I wish I had taken pictures of the old ones...amazingly bad! I mean BIG DEEP CRACKS all along the edge of the rim plus the sidewalls. It's amazing to me it made it home from Coeur d'Alene. I know I was so nervous about getting a blowout I bought a subscription from Coach Net prior to picking up the RV back in November just in case.

PortSider: What do you mean here: "...I'll be chalking the tires to see how that pressure affects the contact patch)"...
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Old 05-31-2014, 01:48 AM   #45
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I should explain the reason why it's okay to slightly over-inflate RV tires (within the max tire pressure stamped on the tire) is the RV weights tend to change... either from adding or taking out camping gear, the transfer of fresh water from the fresh water tank to a waste tank which will increase the load on one axle/axle group, or other reasons why the weights the tires carry might change during use. This is why trailer tires and rear tires on pickup trucks are just listed/recommended as what the max pressure of the tires are.
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Old 05-31-2014, 01:53 AM   #46
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We just purchased our 06 Monaco a couple of weeks ago and the more I read about tires the more paranoid I get. If I'm reading the DOM correctly, the tires are original (29000 miles). I've looked around the web a little and Michelin 235/80R 22.5 are scarce. Prices look like $600 or so each not including FET, shipping, mounting, balancing, etc,etc.Ouch!

I'm hoping there's another alternative. Suggestions very welcome. Maybe I'm just not looking in the right place.

Tom
When I replaced my aged out 235/80/22.5 tires I changed to a different size. I am pleased with the results over the last 7 months. Here is my posting about what I chose to do.
Changed My Tire Size
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:23 AM   #47
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I see many discussions on tires, mostly about their cost. I suppose on a dry straight road, 60F at 50MPH any tire will do. What I wonder, what I really buy a tire for, is how does it do dark night, 33F, rain, curve, panic stop. Does the $300 tire really do the same job as the $600 tire? Chinese manufacturing is very spotty on quality control.

I currently have TOYO, they have serve well so far, even if their ride seems a bit harsh. They came with the MH. Two things I won't skimp on, tires and helmets. YMMV
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:37 AM   #48
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Red Dawg;
I replaced that size Michelins with 255/70-22.5. They are a whole lot cheaper and you will not be able to tell the difference.
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Old 06-01-2014, 08:18 AM   #49
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I'm a Toyo supporter. I put M154's on my last two coachs. This coach, I couldn't get new enough Toyos so I put Hancook AH12's on. Drove 2200 miles. They rode and handled well and were $800 cheaper than the Toyos.
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Old 06-02-2014, 08:41 AM   #50
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There's no doubt that I will be buying new tires now. Cha-ching. $$$

Oh well, better safe then...

Research, I gotta do more research on which ones.
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:12 PM   #51
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Tires

I'm sure everyone has a horrible story to tell about tires. Well here is mine. I just returned from a 4,000 mile vacation that cost me over $3,000 for new tires. Prior to leaving I had a tire dealer check my tires because my mh is a 2007 which makes the tires 7 years old to date. My plan was to replace the tires on my return because I didn't want to spend my money now.
Well part way through the trip I blew a rear tire. I nursed the mh to a close by campground and finally got service and had the tire replaced. Whew.........10 miles down the road, to return to my trip, I blew another rear tire. Again I was able to return to the service repair place because I needed another tire.
Here is the irony, 50 feet from the tire repair place I blow a third tire this time it was a front tire.
Obviously I purchased all new tires.
The reason I'm writing to my co-travelers is to pay attention to your tires. When they say to replace your tires within 7 years believe it. I had exactly 7 year old tires and although you can't physically see a problem it could be internal.
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:26 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by saddlecreek View Post
I'm sure everyone has a horrible story to tell about tires. Well here is mine. I just returned from a 4,000 mile vacation that cost me over $3,000 for new tires. Prior to leaving I had a tire dealer check my tires because my mh is a 2007 which makes the tires 7 years old to date. My plan was to replace the tires on my return because I didn't want to spend my money now.
Well part way through the trip I blew a rear tire. I nursed the mh to a close by campground and finally got service and had the tire replaced. Whew.........10 miles down the road, to return to my trip, I blew another rear tire. Again I was able to return to the service repair place because I needed another tire.
Here is the irony, 50 feet from the tire repair place I blow a third tire this time it was a front tire.
Obviously I purchased all new tires.
The reason I'm writing to my co-travelers is to pay attention to your tires. When they say to replace your tires within 7 years believe it. I had exactly 7 year old tires and although you can't physically see a problem it could be internal.
Your tires could be 8 yrs old. My 2007 is on a 2006 chassis so even tho my tires only had 7,000 miles on them, date codes were early 2006. $3000 out the door with the FMCA discount.

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Old 06-02-2014, 02:46 PM   #53
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Had you been having issues with the tires prior to all of the blowouts such as having to add air every couple of days? Were they all on the same side of the coach? Could you have driven over something and punctured them?

After installing the first tire did the tire shop check the air pressure in the rest of the tires?

It sure seems like bad luck. We are getting a coach and I am trying to understand tires, tire pressure, tire wear and tire life. There is a lot of money tied up in tires and it should be one of the easier things to care for.
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Old 06-02-2014, 07:44 PM   #54
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Tire pressure

"After installing the first tire did the tire shop check the air pressure in the rest of the tires?"

That could be one of the problems leading to the bad experience. Here in CA, the manager at discount tire had to explain to me that state law requires tire shops to check and adjust pressure in the remaining tires when you bring your vehicle in for tire replacement. It seems if you tell the "tech" that if he takes any more air out of your hot tires that you're going to shove that tire gage somewhere requires intervention by the manager.

Now I remove the wheel and take that to the shop so they don't cause my good tires to be under-inflated, or if I can't, I'll find out how much air they removed and re-insert it plus 1 PSI and re-check pressure in the morning.
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Old 06-02-2014, 08:31 PM   #55
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We looked at a '08 Endeavor yesterday that had the original tires. When I mentioned that they were near the point of needing to be replaced, the fellow was almost indignant about it. He called it a sales ploy. He was not going to listen no matter what.
I agree that it almost seems sacrilegious to do away with what looks like perfect tires, but I would be a nervous wreck otherwise.
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Old 06-03-2014, 11:50 AM   #56
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I just received a quote for Yokohama RY103's. They're a little different in size than the Michelins, but the price is good.

$2801.93 vs $3397.13.

Anyone have any bad/good experience with Yokohama tires?

TIA

Tom
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