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Old 04-03-2016, 09:28 AM   #421
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I think it is part geographical, and part financial. Concrete requires above freezing temperatures for a specific period of time. It is more common in the south to pour the slab first. In my case, it was financial. I didn't want to spend the money but elevated my piers for pouring a slab later.
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Old 04-04-2016, 04:39 AM   #422
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Originally Posted by bokobird View Post
That's what the foundation "walls" are for. The inner flooring is considered more finish work than base foundation work. It's not load bearing. And if you poured the floor early on, there'd be a lot of issues with damage from tools being dropped, etc.
Sounds reasonable...but, I notice many don't even have foundation walls of concrete...just concrete for the posts (see recent build pics as an example). Effectively, the walls go to the dirt and the posts are on concrete.

I guess the other explanation of $$ and geography differences makes sense as I have always lived south of the Mason-Dixon Line so perhaps we just pour concrete 10 months a year.
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Old 04-04-2016, 06:31 AM   #423
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Sounds reasonable...but, I notice many don't even have foundation walls of concrete...just concrete for the posts (see recent build pics as an example). Effectively, the walls go to the dirt and the posts are on concrete.

I guess the other explanation of $$ and geography differences makes sense as I have always lived south of the Mason-Dixon Line so perhaps we just pour concrete 10 months a year.
It could be that the concrete cures so much faster in the south than up north that it's not the same issue.

Most buildings are built on top of foundation structures (like the posts you mention) which provide all the support the building needs. I'm not aware of buildings whose load bearing would include the floor as the floor itself would have to be heavily fortified to handle any load.
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Old 04-04-2016, 06:32 AM   #424
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This is probably a really stupid question, but why do so many of these buildings get built prior to the concrete pour? Obviously, I have never built one of these, but to me, it seems that you would want the entire building "on top" of the concrete. I understand that you are pouring footers (in some cases) for the building frame. But wouldn't you want the whole thing (base of wall, etc) sitting on the concrete?

What am I missing?
From a previous thread with basically the same question

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We have a very short building season here in the UP so the the building was built over the winter months time frame when I did not have to compete with the higher building costs. The temperatures were always below the freezing mark so the outside of the building was completed first so as to be able to complete the inside up to the point of painting (while heating the insides) then waiting for warmer weather to lay the concrete which involved waiting for continued weather above the freezing point.

I was the first concrete job of the year (only one concrete plant in the area) so they had to spread all the sand out before it was mixed to make sure there were no ice particles in the sand which would have cause air pockets in the finished product.

As you can see in the date stamp it was a long wait until the end of May

Link to build; http://www.irv2.com/forums/f59/new-r...ng-106725.html


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Old 04-04-2016, 06:38 AM   #425
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Our building is built on the new "Morton Foundation System".

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There is no traditional footing on a pole barn. Simply post set in the ground (different methods). The concrete is the last step simply to minimize damage and mud. You could pour it after the posts are set and have the bottom nailer installed.
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Old 04-04-2016, 07:19 AM   #426
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I love the idea of housing over the garage, except for "retirees" who may not want the stairs to climb daily. I know having a ranch was one of our criteria when choosing our retirement home. We are building the RV garage next door. I will post pix once the work begins/concludes.
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Old 04-04-2016, 08:58 AM   #427
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When stairs become an obstacle that's when a 2 person passenger lift gets installed. Increases the value of the property also by 1.5 - 2 times the cost of the lift. So that's a no brainer.

There are some beach houses in the area that already have them installed. The houses with them are usually getting 25-30 thousand more dollars for the value of the passenger lift.

I have already designed a cargo lift using a commercial grade garage door opening so we don't have to carry "stuff" to the second floor.

Ranch houses are great until you get flooded out from a hurricane being near the ocean.

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Old 04-04-2016, 12:26 PM   #428
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tiger275 - In our case, 6"x6"x18' (and 20') treated lumber was used for wall studs (posts). They were concreted in 30" deep. The baseboard perlin (and all the lumber, for that matter) is 2"x6" treated lumber. Our builder assured us that the treated lumber would last for many years; I believe he brings it in from the northwest. The fill dirt was covered in 6mil plastic and the rebar was on top of that. We used 3/8" rebar 16" OC, and for extra strength we added beams with 5/8" rebar running length-wise down the area where the coach's tires would be, and across where we felt the tires would be parked. And as we said earlier, we stubbed out of the slab for the underground electrical and gray water dump. So, when the slab was poured this gave us a 5" to 5-1/2" finished slab of 350psi concrete ready for utilities. I believe this slab style is fairly common in the south because we don't have permafrost to deal with, and it does provide a very strong building. Just our story of how our dock was built. Good luck with yours.
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Old 04-04-2016, 03:18 PM   #429
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No major progress today. The building looks the same except the big pile of gravel is now spread out in the building and under the porch. That happened this morning, followed by the termite treatment. (Side note: I also got a good deal on treatment of the house and existing garage while they were out, and have that scheduled for next Monday).

The concrete is scheduled to be poured tomorrow morning. The electrical is scheduled for next Monday. The garage door is scheduled for next Wednesday or Thursday.

Since I have shared pictures of the shop with no reference (and since nothing much has changed since the last update), I'll show a picture from the deck. Please disregard the bare spots in front of the pool. I have worked for 4 years to get grass (or weeds) in that area and it just never works out. You can barely see the shop through the Penn Oak tree and the Bradford Pears.

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Fortunately, we have access via my neighbors driveway as long as we both live here but also have an undesirable option of accessing the building by going from our upper driveway and around the left side of the pool. My plans for next year are to tear down the brick retaining wall at our basement / lower driveway and install my own entrance (just in case he moves and the new neighbors aren't as friendly).
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Old 04-05-2016, 06:52 AM   #430
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Hard to tell from the picture, but this has been the scene all morning.... Concrete trucks rolling in delivering 30 yards.

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Old 04-05-2016, 11:55 AM   #431
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Here are a few photos of our new RV Carport/Garage. We are due to close on the beach house later this month.

There is a rear open alley to access the RV Carport. Something that is unique to the area. Two car garage adjacent to the Carport to store all of our "stuff". House is all on the second floor, no fear of flooding! 1400 sq/ft of living area on the second floor, plenty for the two of us.

Plan to get the house settled with new furniture, etc. before heading north to cooler weather.

Looking forward to the change and having more space to relax in while wintering in Florida each year.

Only two blocks from the ocean. Walking distance to surf fishing, etc.

Still plan to use the coach for summer travels while getting away from the heat, humidity and bugs of Florida during the hot summer months.

I guess we will now be Part-Timers after being Full-Time RVer's for over 14 years. We still have a lot to see and do while traveling the country and will never get tired of RVing.

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Congrats, Richard. I really like that cool and unique design. How high is the ceiling for the moho port? Looks like it might be a little tight clearance, prolly can't get up on the roof when the moho is in port, huh?

head gamez, that structure is sure going up fast, won't be long now!
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Old 04-05-2016, 01:30 PM   #432
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Congrats, Richard. I really like that cool and unique design. How high is the ceiling for the moho port? Looks like it might be a little tight clearance, prolly can't get up on the roof when the moho is in port, huh?
There is 12 feet of clearance. My coach specs out at 11 feet 11 inches at ride height.

I plan to dump air and back it in straight which will should give me enough clearance. If not I may need to remove the existing concrete that is there and then dig out some base to lower the new concrete slab which will increase the clearance.

If I need to do maintenance on the roof I will simply pull it out into the rear yard to work on it.

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Old 04-05-2016, 05:48 PM   #433
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Concrete was poured today.... 30 yards

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Old 04-05-2016, 08:20 PM   #434
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head gamez. That looks very nice. What color overhead door are you going to have? Morton builds a nice quality building.
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