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Old 04-15-2017, 01:09 AM   #29
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I would never put my coach in the position of having to lift the rear tires off the ground. The suspension and the tires are designed to support the unsprung weight of the coach, not the frame. The frame is very strong but it will bend like a pretzel if all that weight started to move. On my old motorhome when I dropped my pads down I would put them on large plywood boards but even then I have seen them sink into the earth especially after a hard rain. I wouldn't take the chance.
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Old 04-15-2017, 06:48 PM   #30
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Bill,
Yeah, we're probably talking the same purpose, just a different language. First off, I don't know if you meant this or not by your description but, when you push the button for AUTOMATIC operation, the air is bled from the AIR BAGS, not the SHOCKS. Second, the leveling system does not lift ANY wheels or tires. It lifts the coach body and frame.
If your coach drops 8" when the BAGS are bled, that's a serious amount. A poll was taken a while back and, the majority of the responses stated that their coaches dropped a total of about 3.5" - 4" or so. Mine drops about 3.5" or so.

I tried to upload the HWH Service Manual here but, the system says my PDF is too large. So, I did the next best thing. I looked it back up on line and, here it is:

http://www.hwhcorp.com/ml35963.pdf

On page 5, "Automatic Operation", it spells out what I've been trying to.

Now, if your system operates differently than what's spelled out, then it's just something I don't know about.
Scott
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Old 04-15-2017, 06:59 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlr1951 View Post
Put some planks under the rear wheels and get it as close to level as you can and then use the jacks just to stabilize.
We have some Camco leveling blocks left over from our bumper pull, and we use them to do the same thing. If the site it that bad off level we get it close with those before using the jacks. Makes us feel safer.
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Old 04-15-2017, 07:02 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by FIRE UP View Post
Bill,
Yeah, we're probably talking the same purpose, just a different language. First off, I don't know if you meant this or not by your description but, when you push the button for AUTOMATIC operation, the air is bled from the AIR BAGS, not the SHOCKS. Second, the leveling system does not lift ANY wheels or tires. It lifts the coach body and frame.
If your coach drops 8" when the BAGS are bled, that's a serious amount. A poll was taken a while back and, the majority of the responses stated that their coaches dropped a total of about 3.5" - 4" or so. Mine drops about 3.5" or so.

I tried to upload the HWH Service Manual here but, the system says my PDF is too large. So, I did the next best thing. I looked it back up on line and, here it is:

http://www.hwhcorp.com/ml35963.pdf

On page 5, "Automatic Operation", it spells out what I've been trying to.

Now, if your system operates differently than what's spelled out, then it's just something I don't know about.
Scott
Yes, it operates the same way. But you are correct when you say it it lifts the chassis and not the wheels. I would have to get a lot more complicated in my explanation and it would take far too long to explain the inner workings of the HWH leveling system here. But yes we are on the same page. And yes it is the airbags that deflate not the shocks. But the airbags do absorb some of the shock of the road but technically you are correct. I think we can both agree that lifting the coach up on four jacks is not a very good idea.
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Old 04-15-2017, 07:27 PM   #33
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I find this augment both opinionated and factual depending on the coach manufactures selection of leveling systems and capacity.

I think we are all on the right track and agreement that attempting to level on an extreme slope is a bad idea all the way around no matter what coach, TT, or tent.

I've found that having the wheels lift on my coach is no big deal as long, and my level system jacks, frame, and air springs handle it just fine. As fare as damage to the air springs, it won't happen as long as the shocks are installed, that's the design of all air ride suspension systems. A bounce with no shocks to limit travel is another story.

As far as rolling down the hill, how can the coach roll if it's on the flat pads of the leveling jacks? only if you're on an extreme slope, the one we should not even consider using.

Bottom line is, know your coach, and it's systems. The examples that have been presented by some of jacks bending I've not seen, but I won't discount those who are attempting to present what they consider good advice.

It's been stated many times, do what you are comfortable with, within the limits of your equipment, (within the limits of what is safe)

DTW
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Old 04-16-2017, 08:29 AM   #34
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dtw, ive found over the years to never say never.
i have witnessed bent jack shafts, bent jack brackets and housings, coaches falling off straight jacks because of trying to level on a extreme slope, etc, etc.
the major cause of bent jack shafts are caused by driving off with the jacks down.
not every coach retracts the jacks automatically when you put in gear.
ive replaced several jack brackets and housings caused by it rying to level on extreme slopes. like the grounds at winnebago where they park the coaches at the grand national rally. even when you park with the front of the coach downhill, if the slope is extreme, the whole coach can slide, when parked on grass.
they can also slide sideways in the same conditions.
even the flip down jacks can be damaged in some circumstances.
jacks generally have 5 to 8 inches of lift once they hit the grouns. air bags generally have 3 to 6 inches of lift when leveling.
there are limits to the ability to level, no matter what system you use.
folks should use common sense more often.
but as my dad used to say, "common sense is an uncommon thing"
at 16 i thought thats dumb. now, not so much.
paul maddox
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Old 04-17-2017, 04:58 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azpete View Post
dtw, ive found over the years to never say never.
i have witnessed bent jack shafts, bent jack brackets and housings, coaches falling off straight jacks because of trying to level on a extreme slope, etc, etc.
the major cause of bent jack shafts are caused by driving off with the jacks down.
not every coach retracts the jacks automatically when you put in gear.
ive replaced several jack brackets and housings caused by it rying to level on extreme slopes. like the grounds at winnebago where they park the coaches at the grand national rally. even when you park with the front of the coach downhill, if the slope is extreme, the whole coach can slide, when parked on grass.
they can also slide sideways in the same conditions.
even the flip down jacks can be damaged in some circumstances.
jacks generally have 5 to 8 inches of lift once they hit the grouns. air bags generally have 3 to 6 inches of lift when leveling.
there are limits to the ability to level, no matter what system you use.
folks should use common sense more often.
but as my dad used to say, "common sense is an uncommon thing"
at 16 i thought thats dumb. now, not so much.
paul maddox
Well said AZ,

This is exactly why I hesitate to get into discussion about leveling or tires pressure on this forum. You want to help, but sometimes it like pulling hens teeth. No one situation or explaination will satisfy all scenarios.
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Old 04-17-2017, 06:27 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post

Once your levelers are lifting the rear axle a few inches, the tires are unloaded, and the effect of the brakes are minimized.

Imagine a 4 leg, 40,000 lb table, in that spot. Would it collapse ?

As long as the the jacks are on a firm base, they aren't going to move. They are rated for the weight of the MH and engineered to support it.

The hydraulic system has bypass and relief valves in it, to not overload them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgique View Post

Camp Freightliner says that wheels off the ground is really hard on the air bags (and dangerous).
IMHO these two make the most sense, Think they are both right - not good but not dangerous.

JMHO,

............: banghead:.

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