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Old 10-01-2014, 04:44 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by Ramets View Post
Being from MD. myself I knew they required a class A non commercial drivers license for my motorhome. I already had a CDL and knew I wasn't going to drive professionally anymore, and I didn't want to keep taking those physicals, or the Hazmat tests. So I just went to the MD DMV and exchanged my CDL for the non-commercial one. No testing was involved.
If you are no longer driving professionally, you don't need the medical certificate or the HAZMAT endorsements/testing. I've maintained my CDL for ten years without either and renewed it once in that time.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:53 PM   #86
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I used to think that the purpose of any particular license was an affirmation of one's ability to perform a certain task. After applying for and receiving many different licenses over the years, I have come to realize the following:

1. Governments need a source of revenue...and licensing, along with constant renewals, certainly accomplishes that.
2. The real purpose of the license is to protect the public from you. It also provides others with the path to suing you, for whatever reason.
3. Having a license does not make you in any way competent to perform that task. That is something you either have, or you don't.

I have driven my class A DP motorhome for 22,000 miles, without any training and without any special license. Then again, I have never had an accident in almost 50 years of driving. Some of the jerk truck drivers...with their CDLs and air brake endorsements and hazmat endorsements...have literally scared the crap out of me on the highways.

The way I look at it, stupid is not fixed with a license.
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Old 10-03-2014, 09:17 AM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Air Baron View Post
I used to think that the purpose of any particular license was an affirmation of one's ability to perform a certain task. After applying for and receiving many different licenses over the years, I have come to realize the following:

1. Governments need a source of revenue...and licensing, along with constant renewals, certainly accomplishes that.
2. The real purpose of the license is to protect the public from you. It also provides others with the path to suing you, for whatever reason.
3. Having a license does not make you in any way competent to perform that task. That is something you either have, or you don't.

I have driven my class A DP motorhome for 22,000 miles, without any training and without any special license. Then again, I have never had an accident in almost 50 years of driving. Some of the jerk truck drivers...with their CDLs and air brake endorsements and hazmat endorsements...have literally scared the crap out of me on the highways.

The way I look at it, stupid is not fixed with a license.

I agree. No special license or air brake endorsement required in Georgia. Just a normal driver's license.
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Old 10-03-2014, 02:52 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by stik View Post
The "Brother-in-Law thing" is what I was going to say if asked when I went in for my written + driving test in Illinois plus I was gonna kinda laugh and say I might need to borrow a dime to call someone if I didn't pass!…

…took the written test- passed, then we went out and drove around and BINGO got my endorsement! I was very fortunate, we spent almost the entire drive talking about my Navy career and her son in the Marines.

My only recommendation is go to the smallest town DMV you can find. As a general rule, those folks are more relaxed and personable.

Good luck!
I too live in Illinois. I've been pulling a 27' trailer for years on a normal drivers license and never been stopped or questioned. When we purchased our Class A Motorhome this past February 2014 I had a number of people ask me if I had a Class C CDL license. I always told them you didn't need anything but a normal drivers license for a car to drive an RV of any size. Finally after a number of people asked me about it and suggested I check with the IDMV I called. Sure enough I was told by the nice lady on the other end of the phone that it was a falsity which most people believe in IL and most dealers won't tell you that you indeed do have to have a Class C CDL to pull a trailer over a certain weight or drive a motorhome over a specific size/weight.

So I went to the IDMV, picked up a CDL Rules of the Road book and started studying. I didn't go to the smallest town to have the test done because I've heard of issues with the testers sometimes not thinking about the height or size of the unit and getting you into spaces you really wouldn't want to drive a large unit into and having branches/limbs of trees scraping into the sides or being too tight to maneuver easily so I picked an off time at one of the facilities which test semi drivers and took my written test, passed it and then took and passed the driving portion of the test. (No appointment needed as semi drivers have to do) The worst part about the written test was not really knowing what parts of the book to study since it covered everything for a semi test including, I think, air brakes. I ended up studying it all.

The driving part sounded a lot like yours, the evaluator didn't have me backup, check tires, look at fire extinguishers, etc. only checked the lights and horn. We did a very simple driving test to make sure I knew how to make turns, stop, etc. He talked more about where he's camped and asked where I had been over the years camping. It really is way too simple of a test and even the evaluator said after the test when we were killing some time talking it should be much more stringent like a truck driver would have to take. I agreed with him. My wife also took the test and breezed through it with minimal studying. I think she read through the book one night before bed and then took the written and driving test the day after I took it.

Oh and when I called the IDMV about the driving portion, asking if you needed someone to be with you who had a license the same or more strict then what I needed they said no, they wouldn't be checking for that since they aren't the state police. I found that to be a bit interesting since I would have thought it would have been treated the same as when you go for your original drivers test for a car and they ask who brought you and to see their license.
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Old 10-03-2014, 02:59 PM   #89
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Originally Posted by LabDad2 View Post
I too live in Illinois. I've been pulling a 27' trailer for years on a normal drivers license and never been stopped or questioned. When we purchased our Class A Motorhome this past February 2014 I had a number of people ask me if I had a Class C CDL license. I always told them you didn't need anything but a normal drivers license for a car to drive an RV of any size. Finally after a number of people asked me about it and suggested I check with the IDMV I called. Sure enough I was told by the nice lady on the other end of the phone that it was a falsity which most people believe in IL and most dealers won't tell you that you indeed do have to have a Class C CDL to pull a trailer over a certain weight or drive a motorhome over a specific size/weight.

So I went to the IDMV, picked up a CDL Rules of the Road book and started studying. I didn't go to the smallest town to have the test done because I've heard of issues with the testers sometimes not thinking about the height or size of the unit and getting you into spaces you really wouldn't want to drive a large unit into and having branches/limbs of trees scraping into the sides or being too tight to maneuver easily so I picked an off time at one of the facilities which test semi drivers and took my written test, passed it and then took and passed the driving portion of the test. (No appointment needed as semi drivers have to do) The worst part about the written test was not really knowing what parts of the book to study since it covered everything for a semi test including, I think, air brakes. I ended up studying it all.

The driving part sounded a lot like yours, the evaluator didn't have me backup, check tires, look at fire extinguishers, etc. only checked the lights and horn. We did a very simple driving test to make sure I knew how to make turns, stop, etc. He talked more about where he's camped and asked where I had been over the years camping. It really is way too simple of a test and even the evaluator said after the test when we were killing some time talking it should be much more stringent like a truck driver would have to take. I agreed with him. My wife also took the test and breezed through it with minimal studying. I think she read through the book one night before bed and then took the written and driving test the day after I took it.

Oh and when I called the IDMV about the driving portion, asking if you needed someone to be with you who had a license the same or more strict then what I needed they said no, they wouldn't be checking for that since they aren't the state police. I found that to be a bit interesting since I would have thought it would have been treated the same as when you go for your original drivers test for a car and they ask who brought you and to see their license.

No wonder everyone is confused! Some states calling for a CDL, some not, some saying you need a air brake endorsement, some saying no, some saying it's no different from a car, some giving a full on exam and some breezing through it. My advice for anyone in the future would be simple. Go to your DMV!
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Old 10-03-2014, 03:22 PM   #90
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My advice for anyone in the future would be simple. Go to your DMV!
That would seem to make sense, but often times confusion reigns there as well.

I understand the concern of those who don't want to technically break the law by driving their own rig to DMV to take the test. I'm sure making arrangements with a CDL holder would solve the problem... but, wouldn't paying someone with a non-commercial Class A/B to drive you there be just as technically illegal? I don't know much about CDL but accepting pay to drive a rig you hold a special license to drive seems pretty "commercial" to me. I certainly think that being "busted" for this would be very rare... but IMHO so would being "busted" for driving your own rig to the test.

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Old 10-03-2014, 04:09 PM   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LabDad2 View Post
I too live in Illinois. I've been pulling a 27' trailer for years on a normal drivers license and never been stopped or questioned. When we purchased our Class A Motorhome this past February 2014 I had a number of people ask me if I had a Class C CDL license. I always told them you didn't need anything but a normal drivers license for a car to drive an RV of any size. Finally after a number of people asked me about it and suggested I check with the IDMV I called. Sure enough I was told by the nice lady on the other end of the phone that it was a falsity which most people believe in IL and most dealers won't tell you that you indeed do have to have a Class C CDL to pull a trailer over a certain weight or drive a motorhome over a specific size/weight.

So I went to the IDMV, picked up a CDL Rules of the Road book and started studying. I didn't go to the smallest town to have the test done because I've heard of issues with the testers sometimes not thinking about the height or size of the unit and getting you into spaces you really wouldn't want to drive a large unit into and having branches/limbs of trees scraping into the sides or being too tight to maneuver easily so I picked an off time at one of the facilities which test semi drivers and took my written test, passed it and then took and passed the driving portion of the test. (No appointment needed as semi drivers have to do) The worst part about the written test was not really knowing what parts of the book to study since it covered everything for a semi test including, I think, air brakes. I ended up studying it all.

The driving part sounded a lot like yours, the evaluator didn't have me backup, check tires, look at fire extinguishers, etc. only checked the lights and horn. We did a very simple driving test to make sure I knew how to make turns, stop, etc. He talked more about where he's camped and asked where I had been over the years camping. It really is way too simple of a test and even the evaluator said after the test when we were killing some time talking it should be much more stringent like a truck driver would have to take. I agreed with him. My wife also took the test and breezed through it with minimal studying. I think she read through the book one night before bed and then took the written and driving test the day after I took it.

Oh and when I called the IDMV about the driving portion, asking if you needed someone to be with you who had a license the same or more strict then what I needed they said no, they wouldn't be checking for that since they aren't the state police. I found that to be a bit interesting since I would have thought it would have been treated the same as when you go for your original drivers test for a car and they ask who brought you and to see their license.
LabDad2 You might want to have the folks that told you that you need a CDL(Commercial Driver License) to operate you RV to look at Cyberdriveillinois.com. The section related to Commercial Drivers License list several exemptions for a CDL(Commercial Driver License). Recreational vehicle for personal use is one of them.
Exemptions

Under state and federal law, certain drivers are not subject to the requirements of the CDL program. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has determined these exemptions will not diminish the safe operation of commercial vehicles on the highways. Although the following vehicle operators are not required to obtain CDLs, they are required to hold the proper driver's license classification for the type of vehicles they are operating.
  • Farm Operators — The farm operators' exemption is intended to cover legitimate farm-to-market operations by farmers, not commercial grain haulers. If the farmer, his spouse and their children, parents on both sides, brothers and sisters on both sides and their spouses are operating a truck-tractor semi-trailer combination or combinations and meet the below criteria, they are also exempt from the CDL Program. However, these drivers must be age 21 and the vehicle must have Farm plates. CDLs are not required to operate vehicles that are:
    • Controlled and operated by a farmer, a member of the farmer's family or an employee;
    • Used to transport farm products, equipment, supplies or a combination thereof to or from a farm (including nurseries and aquacultures);
    • Used within 150 air miles of the person's farm;
    • Not used in the operations of a common or contract motor carrier; and
    • Used in nursery or agricultural operations.
  • Firefighting Equipment Operators — Because firefighting organizations have extensive initial training and re-training requirements for their equipment operators, Illinois waives CDL requirements for operators of firefighting equipment owned or operated by or for a government agency. The firefighting and other emergency equipment must have audible and visual signals. The equipment must either be necessary for the preservation of life or property or used in the execution of emergency governmental functions that are normally not subject to general traffic rules and regulations.
  • Recreational Vehicle Operators — Illinois waives CDL requirements for drivers of a recreational vehicle primarily operated as family/personal conveyance for recreational purposes. This includes motor homes and travel trailers.
  • Military Vehicle Operators — U.S. Department of Defense military vehicles being driven by non-civilian personnel for military purposes are exempt from CDL requirements. This includes any driver on active military duty, members of the Reserves, National Guard, personnel on part-time training and National Guard military technicians.
  • Township Employees — An employee of a township or road district with a population of less than 3,000, driving a vehicle within the boundaries of the township or road district for the purpose of removing snow or ice from a roadway by plowing, sanding or salting, is waived from CDL requirements. This exemption is allowed providing that the employee who ordinarily operates the vehicle and holds a properly classified CDL is unable to operate the vehicle or is in need of additional assistance due to a snow emergency
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Old 10-03-2014, 07:51 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by srx-6 View Post
LabDad2 You might want to have the folks that told you that you need a CDL(Commercial Driver License) to operate you RV to look at Cyberdriveillinois.com. The section related to Commercial Drivers License list several exemptions for a CDL(Commercial Driver License). Recreational vehicle for personal use is one of them.
Exemptions

Under state and federal law, certain drivers are not subject to the requirements of the CDL program. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has determined these exemptions will not diminish the safe operation of commercial vehicles on the highways. Although the following vehicle operators are not required to obtain CDLs, they are required to hold the proper driver's license classification for the type of vehicles they are operating.
  • Farm Operators — The farm operators' exemption is intended to cover legitimate farm-to-market operations by farmers, not commercial grain haulers. If the farmer, his spouse and their children, parents on both sides, brothers and sisters on both sides and their spouses are operating a truck-tractor semi-trailer combination or combinations and meet the below criteria, they are also exempt from the CDL Program. However, these drivers must be age 21 and the vehicle must have Farm plates. CDLs are not required to operate vehicles that are:
    • Controlled and operated by a farmer, a member of the farmer's family or an employee;
    • Used to transport farm products, equipment, supplies or a combination thereof to or from a farm (including nurseries and aquacultures);
    • Used within 150 air miles of the person's farm;
    • Not used in the operations of a common or contract motor carrier; and
    • Used in nursery or agricultural operations.
  • Firefighting Equipment Operators — Because firefighting organizations have extensive initial training and re-training requirements for their equipment operators, Illinois waives CDL requirements for operators of firefighting equipment owned or operated by or for a government agency. The firefighting and other emergency equipment must have audible and visual signals. The equipment must either be necessary for the preservation of life or property or used in the execution of emergency governmental functions that are normally not subject to general traffic rules and regulations.
  • Recreational Vehicle Operators — Illinois waives CDL requirements for drivers of a recreational vehicle primarily operated as family/personal conveyance for recreational purposes. This includes motor homes and travel trailers.
  • Military Vehicle Operators — U.S. Department of Defense military vehicles being driven by non-civilian personnel for military purposes are exempt from CDL requirements. This includes any driver on active military duty, members of the Reserves, National Guard, personnel on part-time training and National Guard military technicians.
  • Township Employees — An employee of a township or road district with a population of less than 3,000, driving a vehicle within the boundaries of the township or road district for the purpose of removing snow or ice from a roadway by plowing, sanding or salting, is waived from CDL requirements. This exemption is allowed providing that the employee who ordinarily operates the vehicle and holds a properly classified CDL is unable to operate the vehicle or is in need of additional assistance due to a snow emergency
Sorry, I forgot to add it was a non-commercial CDL but the IDMV did say it was required and I checked with at least two different offices to double check to see if there was any discrepancy. They all said the same thing as well as the DMV where I took the exam. Now maybe they have changed the law since or all the people I spoke with at the various IDMV offices missed that part of the requirements as did I. ;-)
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Old 10-03-2014, 10:57 PM   #93
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LabDad2, It sounds like you were issued some sort of a license from your narrative. Can you look at the license and tell us EXACTLY what the title is on the license and exactly what endorsements you have on the rear? Also the registered weight of your RV and if it has air brakes?

My experience is as follows. States used to issue all driver licenses and each state had different rules, requirements and methods of enforcement. Professional commercial drivers were able to play the game by getting licenses in various states that were more friendly to what and how they drove. In addition, they would often carry multiple licenses issued by multiple states so they could avoid suspensions and other penalties as violations were spread over several states and different persons as far as the individual DMV's were concerned. The FED's finally stepped in for COMMERCIAL OPERATORS ONLY under the commercial interstate provisions of the laws and set the requirements and endorsements for the various weights and classes. Since RV'ers did not drive commercially, they were exempt and a standard auto license covered all. As RV's have grown in length and weight a number of states realized that they needed something to cover this class of vehicle driver. What most have done and are in the process of doing is issuing the Non Commercial Class A and Class B licenses. These generally follow the Federally mandated CDL weights, classes and endorsements, but apply to those not driving a commercial vehicle. Because this corner of the driver license universe belongs to the states to set up and administer, there are some differences in requirements, how and what testing is required and how the program is administered. Some states have seen no need YET to develop this type program, but I believe all will have one eventually. Since these requirements are new, some people administering the relatively new state programs still don't understand it and find it hard to explain. RV dealers choose to ignore it, figuring when you leave the lot it's your problem. If asked, I'd bet all salesmen and women have a CDL as part of the job so when you are driving a test drive their dealer is covered legally.

Hope this clears up some of the confusion in a very confusing topic.

As far as enforcement, since we are not driving commercially, the usual LEO truck enforcement units have very little or no interest in us. The standard road troopers know little or nothing about enforcing heavy vehicle weight and length laws so they don't ask, and we generally skate free in the crack. This too will change eventually, but very slowly as we are a very small minority of the driving world, and generally are an even lower percentage of the law breaking driving world. I've got over 200,000 RV driving miles and even though I've been pulled over a few times, I've never had my vehicle weight vs driving license class even looked at, nor have I ever gotten a ticket.

By the way, I used to set up and teach LEO's driving safety courses in the state, from State Police to the smallest towns forces with one or two officers. I also ran the state AARP 55 Alive program.
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Old 10-04-2014, 05:30 PM   #94
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I agree - Sort of

Quote:
Originally Posted by Air Baron View Post
I used to think that the purpose of any particular license was an affirmation of one's ability to perform a certain task. After applying for and receiving many different licenses over the years, I have come to realize the following:

1. Governments need a source of revenue...and licensing, along with constant renewals, certainly accomplishes that.
2. The real purpose of the license is to protect the public from you. It also provides others with the path to suing you, for whatever reason.
3. Having a license does not make you in any way competent to perform that task. That is something you either have, or you don't.

I have driven my class A DP motorhome for 22,000 miles, without any training and without any special license. Then again, I have never had an accident in almost 50 years of driving. Some of the jerk truck drivers...with their CDLs and air brake endorsements and hazmat endorsements...have literally scared the crap out of me on the highways.

The way I look at it, stupid is not fixed with a license.
I do agree that having a license for something doesn't mean you are qualified it means that at some time you studied and passed the test and paid for that piece of paper. I hold several licenses that mean just that but people look for it. I to drove my Class A of over 31,000 Lbs for over 3,000 miles before I could take my PA Class B Non-Com license test.
The biggest reason I got my license is I am sure that if I was in an accident (even if not my fault) at the least a good lawyer would discover I wasn't properly licensed and everything would go downhill from that point for me.
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Old 10-04-2014, 07:58 PM   #95
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It would really help if the correct terms are used in describing licensing requirements!

Example ....A CDL is a Commercial Drivers License .....there is No such thing as a non Commercial CDL

There is only a Regular Drivers License with various Endorsements when driving a Non Commercial Vehicle!

Where I live they just use a Number Class system !

A Commercial Driver In BC Canada must possess a Class 1 ,2 ,3. Or 4 Commercial License. In addition they may require an Air Brake Endorsement , Industrial Air Brake Endorsement or a Heavy Trailer Endorsement.

They are also regularly tested for Medical Fitness and must pass a Vision Test.

The Non Commercial (regular) Drivers , which includes Me must possess a Provincially issued Divers License in order to operate any privately owned or leased vehicles that are used in a Not for Hire manner?

I have a Class 5 ,6 License with an Air Brake Endorsement ( Code 15)This allows Me to drive any Automobile,Pickup Truck or Motorhome including a U Haul or Larger Cube Van including one with Air Brakes . I can also drive a Bus Conversion with a Tag Axle as long as none are used in a commercial manner.

I can also drive any Motorcycles (class 6)

There are also Class 7 and 8 Licenses which have limitations for Learners !

The license classes and qualifications are available on line at www.icbc.com for those who are interested!
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Old 10-05-2014, 01:34 AM   #96
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Confusion re. IL license I'm required to have to operate my Motorhome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pigman1 View Post
LabDad2, It sounds like you were issued some sort of a license from your narrative. Can you look at the license and tell us EXACTLY what the title is on the license and exactly what endorsements you have on the rear? Also the registered weight of your RV and if it has air brakes?

My experience is as follows. States used to issue all driver licenses and each state had different rules, requirements and methods of enforcement. Professional commercial drivers were able to play the game by getting licenses in various states that were more friendly to what and how they drove. In addition, they would often carry multiple licenses issued by multiple states so they could avoid suspensions and other penalties as violations were spread over several states and different persons as far as the individual DMV's were concerned. The FED's finally stepped in for COMMERCIAL OPERATORS ONLY under the commercial interstate provisions of the laws and set the requirements and endorsements for the various weights and classes. Since RV'ers did not drive commercially, they were exempt and a standard auto license covered all. As RV's have grown in length and weight a number of states realized that they needed something to cover this class of vehicle driver. What most have done and are in the process of doing is issuing the Non Commercial Class A and Class B licenses. These generally follow the Federally mandated CDL weights, classes and endorsements, but apply to those not driving a commercial vehicle. Because this corner of the driver license universe belongs to the states to set up and administer, there are some differences in requirements, how and what testing is required and how the program is administered. Some states have seen no need YET to develop this type program, but I believe all will have one eventually. Since these requirements are new, some people administering the relatively new state programs still don't understand it and find it hard to explain. RV dealers choose to ignore it, figuring when you leave the lot it's your problem. If asked, I'd bet all salesmen and women have a CDL as part of the job so when you are driving a test drive their dealer is covered legally.

Hope this clears up some of the confusion in a very confusing topic.

As far as enforcement, since we are not driving commercially, the usual LEO truck enforcement units have very little or no interest in us. The standard road troopers know little or nothing about enforcing heavy vehicle weight and length laws so they don't ask, and we generally skate free in the crack. This too will change eventually, but very slowly as we are a very small minority of the driving world, and generally are an even lower percentage of the law breaking driving world. I've got over 200,000 RV driving miles and even though I've been pulled over a few times, I've never had my vehicle weight vs driving license class even looked at, nor have I ever gotten a ticket.

By the way, I used to set up and teach LEO's driving safety courses in the state, from State Police to the smallest towns forces with one or two officers. I also ran the state AARP 55 Alive program.
Pigman1,

Sorry for any confusion on my part. I have a IL issued license which is a Class C license. On the back of my license it states "Class: Single Veh GVWR 26000 or Less Except Cycles

So what I have, based on my understanding, is a Non-CDL Class C license which is required by the State of IL to operate my Coachman Encounter 36BH with a GVWR of 22,000 lbs. My Motorhome is a V10, gas guzzler , obviously without air brakes.

This whole thing was confusing to me when I first bought our motorhome because I was always of the understanding after talking with RV dealers in the IL you didn't need anything other than a normal drivers license for driving or pulling an RV. My dad and I pulled trailers and drove different types of motorhomes for close to a combined 60 years and were always of the understanding this was the case in IL but, if it was that way in the past, at some point it may have changed and a different class of IL drivers license is required based on weight of the RV.

I think the biggest part of the confusion comes from it not being a federal law thus being non-standard across the USA, and I'm not trying to start a debate regarding the fed regulating the required drivers license for RVs. I have friends in other states where they tell me they aren't required to have anything other than their normal drivers license to operate or pull an RV.

The biggest thing in my mind regarding what license one needs to have/hold to operate an RV being used for private/personal use is to make sure you check with your state's DMV to see what they say you need and not go by what the dealer says or what a friend/acquaintance says you need. ;-)

Again, I'm sorry if I confused an already confusing topic with my earlier post(s)!
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Old 10-05-2014, 09:40 AM   #97
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To LabDad2 google this:

IL non-CDL Rules of the Road.pdf

It should explain everything. Make sure you read down to Page 4. For some reason a lot of folks will interpret "Recreational Vehicles do not require a CDL" (Page 1) as "OK, I don't need a special license" On page 4 (except below) it clearly states what you need for what you got, and it looks like you are OK:

Driver's License Classifications

Illinois driver's licenses are classified by the GVWR of a vehicle (and any towed vehicles):

Class A — Any combination of motor vehicles with a GCWR of 26,001 pounds or more, providing the GVWR of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds. Also allows for operation of Class B, C and D vehicles.

Class B — Any single motor vehicle with a GCWR of 26,001 pounds or more, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds. Also allows for operation of Class C and D vehicles.

Class C — Any motor vehicle with a GVWR of more than 16,000 pounds, but less than 26,001 pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds. Also allows for operation of Class D vehicles.

Class D — Any motor vehicle with a GVWR of 16,000 pounds or less. Does not include A. B, C, L or M vehicles.

Class L — Any motor-driven cycle with less than 150cc displacement.

Class M — Any motorcycle or motor-driven cycle.


I read the book, took the test and now have a Class BM License. On the reverse it states "Any Single Vehicle (the B part). Any Size Motorcycle (the M part) (I took the motorcycle course/test along time ago).

I took the test in my current motorhome which is rated at 29,410 lbs GVRW and has air brakes. While it is a really good idea to fully understand and know how to test the air brake system, Illinois does not require (or didn't in 2012 when I took the test) an air brake endorsement.
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Old 10-05-2014, 09:43 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LabDad2 View Post
Pigman1,

Sorry for any confusion on my part. I have a IL issued license which is a Class C license. On the back of my license it states "Class: Single Veh GVWR 26000 or Less Except Cycles

So what I have, based on my understanding, is a Non-CDL Class C license which is required by the State of IL to operate my Coachman Encounter 36BH with a GVWR of 22,000 lbs. My Motorhome is a V10, gas guzzler , obviously without air brakes.

This whole thing was confusing to me when I first bought our motorhome because I was always of the understanding after talking with RV dealers in the IL you didn't need anything other than a normal drivers license for driving or pulling an RV. My dad and I pulled trailers and drove different types of motorhomes for close to a combined 60 years and were always of the understanding this was the case in IL but, if it was that way in the past, at some point it may have changed and a different class of IL drivers license is required based on weight of the RV.

I think the biggest part of the confusion comes from it not being a federal law thus being non-standard across the USA, and I'm not trying to start a debate regarding the fed regulating the required drivers license for RVs. I have friends in other states where they tell me they aren't required to have anything other than their normal drivers license to operate or pull an RV.

The biggest thing in my mind regarding what license one needs to have/hold to operate an RV being used for private/personal use is to make sure you check with your state's DMV to see what they say you need and not go by what the dealer says or what a friend/acquaintance says you need. ;-)

Again, I'm sorry if I confused an already confusing topic with my earlier post(s)!
Oh, absolutely no need to apologize. With a program as complex as this is, it's a wonder anyone can keep it straight. Add to that the mis-information and downright lies being told by RV dealers and the speed at which the states are changing their requirements, and it's just about impossible to get a straight story anywhere.

It sounds like you have the correct license for your rig. Generally anything under 26,000 lbs falls on the basic tag we all started out with. Above that is where it gets really murky. Your point about checking with the local DMV office is absolutely right. I might even suggest checking with 2 or 3 as with the programs changing as rapidly as they are, sometimes even the guys who should know, do not.

This was a good thread, and should serve to at least make folks aware of how complex the system is. Given all that, with the current level of enforcement out there on this, it'd doubtful that there's going to be a rash of RV'ers caught and cited for the wrong license. Never-the-less, if you or I happen to be the one in a million who does get nailed, it doesn't make it any easier to swallow.

Safe travels,
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