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Old 09-13-2015, 07:11 AM   #43
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Marc, it will be a few days before it is loaded again on the lift. We have a few days of touring Nova Scotia before moving on. The 2x6 is about a 2' piece that I put in the track to raise up the front wheel so that the foot board and pipe section would clear the pivot point. It's laid in there about mid way on the track. Once those parts are clear of the pivot point/hinge the bike can proceed with the load/off-load. Depending on the lay of the land, I sometime put a section of 2x12 on the approach to the lift to aid in the transition of ground to channel.

On a note, I installed footboard extenders which move the footboards out 3/4" but not down any. I also have aftermarket pipes, FuelMoto stainless steel, that use the stock mounting and heat shields. As such the pipe situation isn't any lower or wider than stock but the footboards are a bit wider. I may remove the right side and see if that improves the situation.

For chock, I looked at the HydraLift wheel chock option and it's basically the same as the cradle part from a Harbor Freight or Condor wheel chock. Since I had spares of both, I used the Condor one since it was narrower and only required grinding a small amount off the shaft. I made careful measurements of the desired distance needed between the HydraLift wheel stop and the pivot point for the cradle. Drilled 1/2" holes in the sides of the channel, reinforced the sides with steel plate and ran a long 1/2" bolt through to use as the "axle". The cradle is not adjustable now but I never moved it anyway. The position allows me to ride in, the stop/lock holds the bike secure enough until I can get straps on. I can load/off-load by myself, but having a 2nd person helps me guide the bike straight on and stabilize it till the straps are on.

I like the idea of the diamond plate side plates and will concoct something after this trip.
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Old 09-13-2015, 10:46 AM   #44
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Pictures when you can. I too am in the same situation. I'm calling Hydralift Monday and hoping to get one installed by the first week in November.


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Old 09-13-2015, 12:55 PM   #45
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Drwwicks

Thanks for the info. It will help when I finally get one.

Duoglide. Let us know what you find out from Hydralift.
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Old 09-13-2015, 02:15 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by drwwicks View Post
Marc, it will be a few days before it is loaded again on the lift. We have a few days of touring Nova Scotia before moving on. The 2x6 is about a 2' piece that I put in the track to raise up the front wheel so that the foot board and pipe section would clear the pivot point. It's laid in there about mid way on the track. Once those parts are clear of the pivot point/hinge the bike can proceed with the load/off-load. Depending on the lay of the land, I sometime put a section of 2x12 on the approach to the lift to aid in the transition of ground to channel.

On a note, I installed footboard extenders which move the footboards out 3/4" but not down any. I also have aftermarket pipes, FuelMoto stainless steel, that use the stock mounting and heat shields. As such the pipe situation isn't any lower or wider than stock but the footboards are a bit wider. I may remove the right side and see if that improves the situation.

For chock, I looked at the HydraLift wheel chock option and it's basically the same as the cradle part from a Harbor Freight or Condor wheel chock. Since I had spares of both, I used the Condor one since it was narrower and only required grinding a small amount off the shaft. I made careful measurements of the desired distance needed between the HydraLift wheel stop and the pivot point for the cradle. Drilled 1/2" holes in the sides of the channel, reinforced the sides with steel plate and ran a long 1/2" bolt through to use as the "axle". The cradle is not adjustable now but I never moved it anyway. The position allows me to ride in, the stop/lock holds the bike secure enough until I can get straps on. I can load/off-load by myself, but having a 2nd person helps me guide the bike straight on and stabilize it till the straps are on.

I like the idea of the diamond plate side plates and will concoct something after this trip.
drwwicks,
Wow, it's amazing how much we thought alike in setup and, operation of loading and off loading our bikes on these Hydralifts. I also used a Condor pivoting chock to "lock" the bike in place as I rode it into the rail and, the final stop. I could then get off the bike, with it standing straight up, and proceed to tie it down. I too tried the lumber in the rail to raise the bike a bit for added clearance in the pivots of the lift arms. For whatever reason, I elected not to use it.

As for the height difference between the rail and, the ground, yes, I too had to create a bit of a "ramp" for that scenario. Well, since I had all the components hanging around, I just made one. And, the way I did it, I created a "funnel" ramp. That is, it guided my bike from left or right, right into the center of that rail.

It is portable so, after I used it, I just put it in a compartment. Below are a couple of pics of it, if you'd like any ideas.
Scott
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Old 09-13-2015, 08:22 PM   #47
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Fire up, I like that idea and will make one after this trip along with a diamond plate side plate for my feet on loading, The side plate should help deflect some of the road debris/muck when driving on rainy roads. The Geza cover does a good job of keeping the bike clean except the bottom areas.

DR
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Old 10-12-2015, 01:55 PM   #48
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I know this thread is old but hope it's still active. I either have to pull the trigger on the Hydralift soon or put my Glide in storage. Couple questions I still have. I know I'll have to disco the towed to check my oil etc but do I also have to remove the tow bar each time? Does the lift need to be removed for normal service/repair or just something major? How many tie down points need to be fabricated for a secure tie down on a Harley dresser? TIA


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Old 10-12-2015, 02:57 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duoglide1 View Post
I know this thread is old but hope it's still active. I either have to pull the trigger on the Hydralift soon or put my Glide in storage. Couple questions I still have. I know I'll have to disco the towed to check my oil etc but do I also have to remove the tow bar each time? Does the lift need to be removed for normal service/repair or just something major? How many tie down points need to be fabricated for a secure tie down on a Harley dresser? TIA


2007 Monaco Executive 45' 525 ISX
Duoglide 1,
First off, as you know, the Hydralift comes with its own receiver. It is not in the way of the lift, as is raises and lowers, even with a bike on it. If it was, then the lift could not travel up and down. If you take a look at my pics in my previous posts on this thread, you'll see the Aluminum Diamond Deck floor that I installed. That floor was part of their "No-touch" cover I purchased, installed, and adjusted for two days and it still "touched" the bike/paint in several places.

So, I sent it back to Hydralift and, kept the floor, which was part of the cover kit. The Hydralift receiver does not touch that floor either, on its way up or down. Obviously that's the way it's all designed, otherwise the whole thing would not work. That floor, was sure handy for additional stabilization while loading and off-loading the bike. Otherwise, your feet and legs would extend a bit more to touch the ground and you bike is higher due to the fact that it's on the rail and, the rail does not go to the ground.

The cross-beams/tied down ends hit the ground so, that keeps the tire rail up higher.

Now, with all that being said, you asked about tie-down points. Well, I personally am not familiar with where or, how many tie points there are on a Harley, any model of Harley. The tie down points that are built into the cross beams of the Hydralift are placed generically. If they fit a given bike and, it's angle of tie straps, that's great. But, if they're off some, and don't provide the correct angle for tie straps, then alterations must be done so that your expensive Harley is STILL THERE after a days travel.

So, again, if you look at some of my pics, you'll see an additional sub-structure that I fabricated up, to allow for more and proper tie down points for our Honda Goldwing. That sub-structure is made of the same dimensional steel as what the tie down/cross beams are from the factory. Our Wing has a very limited angle of the tie straps on the front. So, I could not depend on the factory installed ones, to do the support for that 900 lb. bike.

But, by adding that substructure, it provided for the appropriate angle for the tie straps off the triple tree fork clamps. That made it way safer and secure.

Now, I didn't know all this before hand. I had to mount the lift and, get the bike on there, in its final resting position and, then see what was what and, what, if any, modifications were needed. It was only then that I determined I needed another complete sub-structure for the proper securing of the Wing. That substructure took me the better part of about 2 days to draw up, fabricate, weld and, install. It was all worth it.

My tie straps were seriously close to the painted Wings fender and, lower part of the fairing. But, they NEVER touched either one.


Now, as for lift being in the way of checking your oil etc. Yep, it is, but, not to the point that you CAN'T do those checks. What I used to do was, lower the lift, with the bike on it, about 1/2 way. That would present the most amount of room, between the lift/bike and, the back of the coach. I don't know how much work-able space you'll have, based on your coach and it's rear cap characteristics and, the mounting characteristics of the lift itself.

You see, whoever mounts the lift, needs to get it so it's as close to the rear of the coach as possible so that there's less cantilever effect, when hitting bumps and bad spots in our less than perfect U.S. Roads out there. So, you see, there's lots to consider when this venture is undertaken. It's not all that hard, you just have to think about a few things ALL AT ONCE, when the lift is being primarily setup for installation.

One more thing. When the bike is not on the lift, the lift PIVOTS upwards. All that needs to be done is, you pull two large pins and, the whole platform tilts up towards the rear of the coach. Then, you re-install the pins to keep it up in that position. That's somewhat of a benefit

Anyway, I hope I've answered some of your questions. If not either PM me or, just ask away.
Scott
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Old 10-12-2015, 04:22 PM   #50
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Thanks, Scott that helps. We are full time now so limited tools and fabricating abilities. If I got to the Pacific NW I could do all that at my brothers-but the bike would be 2000 miles away in Texas. As I said I either have to do it now or store the bike for the winter. One way or the other Nov 1 I'm moving again. Thanks again, travel safe.


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Old 10-13-2015, 08:05 AM   #51
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Scott a couple thoughts from my perspective. In order to lower the bike on the lift, the "toad" needs to be disconnected and the hitch ball mount removed from the Hydralift built in receiver. I added the optional front tie-down bar but found that it had too much flex to be secure when strapped down. I added the Harley front fork tie-down "hooks" and run an additional strap from them down to the main fore-aft cross bar. I got tie down rings from a hardware store and installed than on the lift. The aft tie-down points are from the bag guard to the aft bar. 6 straps and it rides secure. 2 weeks ago had a panic stop from almost 55 when someone abruptly stoop ahead and everything was secure. Well almost, a few things flew forward in the coach.

Bottom line the lift works but loading and unloading can be difficult depending on the surface. I carry a carpet section for when the ground is potentially soft. Mine is lowered and have to put a board in the track in order for the footboard mounts to clear the lift hinge/knuckle.

I have a side radiator but can get to the engine with the bike on and up in order to check oil ext. During rain storm had to check and drain fuel water separator in a rest area with the bike mounted. Lift actually proves a step platform for working.

Couldn't get pictures to down load. Feel free to ask any other questions.

David
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Old 10-13-2015, 12:28 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by drwwicks View Post
Scott a couple thoughts from my perspective. In order to lower the bike on the lift, the "toad" needs to be disconnected and the hitch ball mount removed from the Hydralift built in receiver. I added the optional front tie-down bar but found that it had too much flex to be secure when strapped down. I added the Harley front fork tie-down "hooks" and run an additional strap from them down to the main fore-aft cross bar. I got tie down rings from a hardware store and installed than on the lift. The aft tie-down points are from the bag guard to the aft bar. 6 straps and it rides secure. 2 weeks ago had a panic stop from almost 55 when someone abruptly stoop ahead and everything was secure. Well almost, a few things flew forward in the coach.

Bottom line the lift works but loading and unloading can be difficult depending on the surface. I carry a carpet section for when the ground is potentially soft. Mine is lowered and have to put a board in the track in order for the footboard mounts to clear the lift hinge/knuckle.

I have a side radiator but can get to the engine with the bike on and up in order to check oil ext. During rain storm had to check and drain fuel water separator in a rest area with the bike mounted. Lift actually proves a step platform for working.

Couldn't get pictures to down load. Feel free to ask any other questions.

David
Good post David,
As you can tell, carrying a large motorcycle, be it a Harley or Goldwing or, whatever on the Hydralift on the back of a coach, is not without issues. Nothing in this world is easy. You have to compromise between the nicety of having your M/C with you and, any issues caused by carrying it. Yep, it's been a while since we carried ours back there. I forgot about needing to remove the ball/slider out of the receiver to raise and or, lower the bike.

I just wrote it off as being part of fringe benefit of having the bike and, no trailer. There's other ways of toting your bike, like a trailer or, a tandem dolly that handles both the bike and a toad but, not without the logistics of where to put that massive thing when you arrive at a campsite etc. And, while I've never done it, I'm assuming you have to unload or load the bike with a dolly linked up to the back of the coach due to stabilization of that dolly. That means when you arrive at a campsite, you will more than likely have to park away some place, out of the way, to have room to unload the bike, and maybe a car or something, then, go park the coach in your intended campsite. There might be a few exceptions to this but, that's the way I picture it.

Hence, that's why we chose the Hydralift. I dropped the car, pulled into the campsite and, in about 99.99% of most campsites, could off load the bike right in the campsite. But, we've since changed "M.O." as cops would say and, things are way different now.

So, you've found out what you need to do to accommodate your situation. As far as tie downs, you've also adapted to your needs. The Hydralift is a great lift but, when it comes to tying down certain big bikes, there must be some concessions made in order to adapt.

In the end, you've got your coach, your bike and, a toad, it don't get any better than that.
Scott
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Old 10-13-2015, 06:42 PM   #53
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here are two photos on the tie downs. one is using the 6 point system on my Gold Wing, and then when I was at the RV dealer today I saw the other. they only tie-down on the handlebars. Double tie-downs on both sides. I personally like to spread it around. I do have the optional tie down bars due to the GW being so wide up front.
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Old 10-13-2015, 06:43 PM   #54
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Duoglide1, what part of the country are you in ?


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Old 03-06-2016, 10:53 AM   #55
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This is my first post on here.

This is a great conversation on install and photos for the Hydralift. We have a 2010 Newmar Ventana 3933 and just purchased a Hydra lift. I did the calculation and we are within 300 lbs to the max weight on the rear axle. We will just move our heavier cargo to the front compartments of our coach. I'm going to install it myself, was originally going to weld in place but NOT now. Scott's idea of welding the mounting plates to angled steel and bolting to the main frame is a great idea. I will do the same thing with quick connects and powder coat before final install. I will post photos when I'm complete. Thanks to everyone for your ideas! I'm really glad I found this conversation, I've been searching now for a while on differend ideas.
Bruce
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Old 03-06-2016, 01:01 PM   #56
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This is my first post on here.

This is a great conversation on install and photos for the Hydralift. We have a 2010 Newmar Ventana 3933 and just purchased a Hydra lift. I did the calculation and we are within 300 lbs to the max weight on the rear axle. We will just move our heavier cargo to the front compartments of our coach. I'm going to install it myself, was originally going to weld in place but NOT now. Scott's idea of welding the mounting plates to angled steel and bolting to the main frame is a great idea. I will do the same thing with quick connects and powder coat before final install. I will post photos when I'm complete. Thanks to everyone for your ideas! I'm really glad I found this conversation, I've been searching now for a while on differend ideas.
Bruce
bpye911,
I have many, many pictures of the steel work, ideas, pre-positions (before final assembly) and more. If you'd like any assistance in this mounting of your Hydralift, please either PM me or, just feel free to ask on here. There are "hidden" challenges that need to be addressed prior to doing any final welding/bolting/assembly. Good luck.
Scott
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