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Old 04-29-2014, 06:14 PM   #29
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Thanks. Can you tell me the depth of the fridge cabinet? I was going to replace mine but I found that most residential units would stick out about 2-4 inches into the hallway. Yours looks like it is inset into the cabinet real nice.
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Old 04-29-2014, 06:21 PM   #30
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My cabinet is 27" deep. The fridge do not go all the way back. Check Lowes website and they will give you all the specs on all the fridges they sell.
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Old 04-29-2014, 08:48 PM   #31
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Looks good
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Old 04-29-2014, 11:59 PM   #32
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FWIW, it is VERY easy to remove a window in most any coach. Takes about fifteen minutes, and 30 minutes to clean up, re-seal, and reinstall. I could have wrestled my residential fridge in through the door (after removing the fridge doors), but when I took out the window, it was SO easy. Put the fridge in the bed of a pickup truck and have two guys help you feed it through the window. Use tape to temporarily hold a towel over the window's bottom opening to keep from scratching the fridge.

Van W 2000 Dynasty 36 pulling one Harley
Eastern NC
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Old 04-30-2014, 10:44 AM   #33
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Charles,

I have the same year/model Journey. How did you get the old Norcold out and the new unit in the coach? I have been considering this mod. My Norcold still works but am preparing for the day when that changes. How did you change the electrical to use an inverter? Dedicated to the refer?

Thanks,
Craig
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Old 04-30-2014, 03:33 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rcdukes View Post
Charles,

I have the same year/model Journey. How did you get the old Norcold out and the new unit in the coach? I have been considering this mod. My Norcold still works but am preparing for the day when that changes. How did you change the electrical to use an inverter? Dedicated to the refer?

Thanks,
Craig
Removed passenger seat. Remove doors on both old and new (Lowes had free delivery and take away, $10 each tip) and you'll have no trouble old out and new in.

Had to extend the floor under old fridge and plug propane. Electrical outlet was not serviced by the inverter so tapped into coffee pot plug and also put on/off switch over pantry. Previous post had Velcro install for doors. Hole drilled ventillation holes above fridge cabinet.

Don't want to hijack the op's thread so if you have any questions PM me.
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Old 07-27-2014, 09:42 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Bolt View Post
That is a good idea.
.............text deleted.......

Surprised nobody commented on the insulation burning picture. That really confirmed to me that replacing the Norcold amonia boiler operated system was a solid safety factor decision...
First of all, Thanks to Bad Bolt for posting his install. I just completed the same install and it works great.

My old refrigerator was still working, but the door hinges were broken with no practical way of repairing them due to the construction method of the Norcold door.

I don't think it was burned insulation, but it sure looks burned. When I removed my norcold (same unit as Bad Bold removed), I found the same black marks on the insulation. It lines up exactly where the flame exhaust pipe from the burner allows the exhaust gases into the chimney box. See the next two pictures:





My theory is that when the burner first lights, it produces some soot that stains the insulation and rear of the refrigerator unit.

Here's a picture of my finished installation.




Some install notes:

On my motorhome, this was a tight fit but it worked without cutting anything. The sides of the refrigerator bow outward slightly, so this was a slight interference fit while pushing it into place. I had space above the furnace (below the refrigerator) so I drilled several 3/4 inch holes for air flow. There is a 3/4 inch gap above the refrigerator, and I do get a healthy flow of hot air out of that top gap when the refrigerator is running. I can add a small fan to force air from the furnace box past the refrigerator coils if I later find it needs more ventilation.

I shimmed under the rear brace near the rear rollers, and through bolted with washers and nuts inside the furnace area. Installation can be made easier by adding 5/8 inch board for the rollers to engage as the refrigerator is made to naturally be lower in the back than the front, but I wanted it vertically flush with the opening. I've not attached anything to the front, but I don't think it will go anywhere with the through bolts holding it down.

I closed off the ceiling vent by filling it with the insulation I removed from the walls, and finishing with a board to hold it in place. I also sealed the removable outside refrigerator vent by using some foam board so that I could still remove it from outside (to get to the 110 volt plug and/or bolts if I ever have to remove it).

By removing the refrigerator doors, (and my coach screen door was already removed as we don't use it) the old refrigerator and the new one moved through the front door fairly easily. I did remove the passenger seat for extra room.

Installation is made easier if you have something about the same height as the opening to place the refrigerator on before sliding it into the opening.

Within an hour of turning on the new refrigerator, the freezer was at 1 degree and the refrigerator portion was at 41. The unit is very quiet.

There is no icemaker, and the manufacturer only supplies one very tiny ice tray so I'll be getting additional ice trays. The stainless steel finish does show fingerprints easily, so keep this in mind when you select a finish.

I got extremely lucky as my local Lowes store (Savannah on Abercorn) had an overstock sale and I got the new refrigerator for $325 plus taxes. My understanding is that this was only at this one store as the internet price still is about $400.

I reused a section of the black trim from the old Norcold to place it along the bottom of the opening. This is visible in the picture above.

To keep the doors closed during travel, I borrowed another poster's idea (Thanks Charlie Tuit) and stapled a length of velcro strap inside the cabinet where it can contact the top of the freezer door and another at the bottom of the refrigerator door. A strip of velcro stuck to the top of the freezer door and to the bottom of the refrigerator door will keep the doors closed during travel. Another small tab of velcro allows storage of the straps without losing them inside the cabinet.

This is a lot of detailed info, but I hope it helps someone else that needs to replace their refrigerator.

Fred
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