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Old 08-09-2013, 09:23 PM   #15
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^^^ did you look at the link? We're not exactly talking tig / mig here. Yep it could be a problem - but it also looks very doable. One could buy some test materials for a few bucks and see how it goes. But the cost of the unit could be a factor since most of us don't have one. I wonder if many RV service centers have them??
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:59 AM   #16
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I'm pretty good at welding and soldering but I see your point. I'd rather not uproot the tanks of they can be repaired. This looks like it's going to get dirty!! LOL!! Going have to get in there with a flashlight and pinpoint the source of the leak. I'm wonder if fibered roof cement would work for leak repair? What do you think? I've used it before to repair some pretty hardcore leaks and it was successful.


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that is gutsy advice I would never just arbitrarily advise someone to weld anything. If they are not a good welder (kind of like me) then a small leak can turn into a new tank. Before I retired when my friends needed a good laugh they would have me tig weld something. Usually something that it did not matter if i turned a small tear into a 4 inch wide canyon. If it is a small leak that the OP can get to in order to weld any of the available plastic tank epoxy repair putty should fix it. Like I said in my original post. I had to repair my plastic diesel fuel tank on my 50 hp 4 wheel drive tractor. It has been three years since I repaired it and it still does not leak.
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Old 08-10-2013, 09:14 AM   #17
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If you go on PPL web site they have a holding tank repair kit. I have used them twice. Once on a class C holding tank and once on a dodge pick-up gas tank. Both repairs never leaked. The dodge pick-up was done about 5 years ago and I still own it.
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Old 08-10-2013, 09:24 AM   #18
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"Welding" is a little different process when applied to plastic tanks. Probably more reliable if done by someone in that business. But "melting" looks doable with practice.
A detailed discussion here: Grey Tank Leak
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:15 PM   #19
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I'm pretty good at welding and soldering but I see your point. I'd rather not uproot the tanks of they can be repaired. This looks like it's going to get dirty!! LOL!! Going have to get in there with a flashlight and pinpoint the source of the leak. I'm wonder if fibered roof cement would work for leak repair? What do you think? I've used it before to repair some pretty hardcore leaks and it was successful.
I can mig weld pretty good and that was my point. different types of welding takes practice. I would not advise anyone to just weld something like a tank unless they had mentioned they knew how to do that from before. The poster about an epoxy not holding could be right. I know I have used jb weld on the high pressure oil line going to the remoter oil filter on my chevrolet blazer. It lasted for 4 years until I gave that car to my stepson and he totaled it. I have said a couple of times that I fixed the diesel fuel tank on my tractor to me that is the hardest leak to fix. Diesel fuel likes to get through a lot of things. The repair was easy. The tank epoxy is just a little cylinder of material. You cut off what you need and you knead it very thorougly until it changes to the color they mention in the directions. then let it dry. The leak I fixed is very common on this tractor because of the way the tank flexes. If the epoxy can hold that I am pretty comfortable with it for a repair. This is also a plastic nothing holds to it type of material. The epoxy is specially made just for this purpose.
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Old 08-11-2013, 10:57 AM   #20
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Welding plastic tanks can be done with a soldering iron and cut up plastic bucket pieces. Take the soldering iron tip and "V" out the crack and then start over at one end and melt both the crack walls and the plastic bucket pieces together into a seam. It looks like and acts like thick mud. I did it to my own tanks and it works fine even after 5000 miles of dragging it down the road. Practice a little on the plastic bucket first to get a feel for it. I used a large tip in a Weller soldering iron and didn't need to remove the tanks. Mine were broken at the drain outlet necks from a loose drain tube to the valves.It bounced up and down and broke the neck of the tank.
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:05 PM   #21
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I hear you. LOL! I usually empty all my tanks before hitting the road. Dry weight only means better gas mileage. I thought it might best to just replace the tanks. Since I can get the holding tanks for a reasonable price. However I'm still debating because of the labor involved. These aren't your simple 8 gallon tanks that most motorhome are equipped with. These are 42 gallons each. They are mounted to the underside of the coach floor. The floor is steel. They bottom of the tanks can be seen from luggage compartments on the drivers side where the sewer drain valves are connected to the system where the main 30 amp power cord is also stored.


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I think you are just putting a "band-aid" on a holding tank thats leaking using any epoxy or procedure . I'll guarantee it will fail at the most in- opportune time. The force of 8lb a gallon water sloshing and bouncing up and down. Something caused it to fail already, no guarantee its not ready to to it again in another location. A leaking fresh water tank, no big deal but a leaking gray/black tank is a big deal.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:15 PM   #22
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One alternative is to reconsider buying a MH for a permanent set-up housing unit. I think a trailer or 5er is much better suited for that use. re: plastic welding; any auto-body shop has and uses a plastic welding machine, there is no flame as most use hot air instead, some a hot tip similar to a large soldering iron. The trick is, the filler material must be the same as the cracked material.
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