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Old 05-15-2016, 05:50 PM   #15
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Collinite and RejeX

Just wondering...

Since my 2002 Dynasty is all fiberglass (fiberglass roof, front & rear caps, and gelcoat sidewalls), I was thinking that the fiberglass boat products would be best suited for my motorhome. I found them here:

Collinite RV Wax Products

So, I am wondering if, once I clean and wax the fiberglass with the collinite products, could I then cover the paint with RejeX paint sealer?

RejeX

Or is that a foolish idea? I am not a paint care expert and would like to protect my ol' boy as best I can.

Since we will be on the road for two years, I will not have a 'home' to do the big cleaning and waxing again after we leave and will then have to use one-step cleaner-wax products on the fly along the way.

Thank you for any input.
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Old 05-15-2016, 11:21 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaceutah View Post
Just wondering...

Since my 2002 Dynasty is all fiberglass (fiberglass roof, front & rear caps, and gelcoat sidewalls), I was thinking that the fiberglass boat products would be best suited for my motorhome. I found them here:

Collinite RV Wax Products

So, I am wondering if, once I clean and wax the fiberglass with the collinite products, could I then cover the paint with RejeX paint sealer?

RejeX

Or is that a foolish idea? I am not a paint care expert and would like to protect my ol' boy as best I can.


Since we will be on the road for two years, I will not have a 'home' to do the big cleaning and waxing again after we leave and will then have to use one-step cleaner-wax products on the fly along the way.

Thank you for any input.

If you use Rejex they recommend removing all other waxes/polishes before applying. They sell a cleaner for this purpose called Xtreme Clean.

Extreme Clean

I have been using Rejex on our coach since it was new in 2006. I apply it in the spring and fall to the whole coach and before each trip I apply a fresh coat to the front for extra protection from the bugs.

Jon
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Old 05-17-2016, 11:46 AM   #17
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Go to Shurhold.com website--plenty of info on buffers waxes,polishes etc
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Old 05-17-2016, 12:03 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaceutah
Just wondering...

Since my 2002 Dynasty is all fiberglass (fiberglass roof, front & rear caps, and gelcoat sidewalls), I was thinking that the fiberglass boat products would be best suited for my motorhome. I found them here:

Collinite RV Wax Products

So, I am wondering if, once I clean and wax the fiberglass with the collinite products, could I then cover the paint with RejeX paint sealer?

RejeX

Or is that a foolish idea? I am not a paint care expert and would like to protect my ol' boy as best I can.

Since we will be on the road for two years, I will not have a 'home' to do the big cleaning and waxing again after we leave and will then have to use one-step cleaner-wax products on the fly along the way.

Thank you for any input.
I used Collinite last year with great results, I believe it was the 921 final wax. It's highly recommend in several marine forums for gel coat, withstands saltwater and extreme conditions.

It still looks great a year later, they have several products including a cleaner/oxidation remover that was highly recommended also.

I'm sold and see no need to use anything else for gel coat.
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Old 05-17-2016, 08:32 PM   #19
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I used Collinite last year with great results, I believe it was the 921 final wax. It's highly recommend in several marine forums for gel coat, withstands saltwater and extreme conditions.

It still looks great a year later, they have several products including a cleaner/oxidation remover that was highly recommended also.

I'm sold and see no need to use anything else for gel coat.
Maybe applying the RejeX is one step too much then.

It appears the RejeX is more automotive in application (full body paint) rather than fiberglass/gel coat specific (which is me).

I will have to start with the "Collinite #920 Fiberglass Boat Cleaner" first then go to the wax. Would the "Collinite #925 Fiberglass Boat Wax" be enough?
Or must I use the paste wax (I Have a bum arm and that would be really tough with how big Earl is..) ? Does the paste wax instead of the bottle mean a power drill with some sort of pad on it?

Thank you for your expertise. This is all new to me....




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Old 05-17-2016, 08:37 PM   #20
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Go to Shurhold.com website--plenty of info on buffers waxes,polishes etc
Pretty amazing stuff!

Dual Action Polisher | RV | Shurhold

It is a maze of pads and things!

I wonder if there is a place I can rent a polisher, instead of spending $100+ on the machine, plus all of the pads. We are currently selling everything and this does seem overwhelming...
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:19 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaceutah

Maybe applying the RejeX is one step too much then.

It appears the RejeX is more automotive in application (full body paint) rather than fiberglass/gel coat specific (which is me).

I will have to start with the "Collinite #920 Fiberglass Boat Cleaner" first then go to the wax. Would the "Collinite #925 Fiberglass Boat Wax" be enough?
Or must I use the paste wax (I Have a bum arm and that would be really tough with how big Earl is..) ? Does the paste wax instead of the bottle mean a power drill with some sort of pad on it?

Thank you for your expertise. This is all new to me....

It's far from expertise, but you're welcome. My detailer pointed me in the right direction.

I haven't tried the 920 cleaner, my rig was so oxidized being over 30 years old, I had to actually wet sand the whole coach to get it off with 2000 grit. Then 3M super duty compound with a wool pad and buffer, then 3M finesse it II with 3M foam pad, finally 925 wax. But that was my old rig, it was a lot of work

I haven't tried the paste either by Collinite, but I would seriously look at the 3M Finesse it II with a foam pad works wonders, and is easy to work with. Then the 925 final wax, but that's just my opinion

Collinite has been around a long time, and their only advertising since day one has been word of mouth.
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:30 AM   #22
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Where is everyone getting their pads for you DA orbital buffers ? I finally got a buffer and now I need a couple of pads. I'm looking for a list of places where I can purchase the pads. Our MH is in pretty good condition so I'll be looking to wax/seal or polish only. Oxidation is not an issue.
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:38 AM   #23
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eBay and Amazon are tough to beat, I like these type of foam pads.



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Old 05-18-2016, 11:44 AM   #24
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If you go to "auto geek" website you'll see some dual action buffers. I have a Cyclo and I love it. The cutters you're referring to are the pads that go on the buffers. Each pad is a different color and each color represents a more course pad.

These are easy to use and contrary to what you hear you have to work hard at being stupid to do any damage with the exception of the decals. A buffer ruins a decal as soon as it touches it.
X 2 i just use Meguiars - They have it all and they all work - Nu Finish is also good if it sits for a while.

The Cyclo may cost a little but the Kids will love it when your gone

BOL,
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:53 AM   #25
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Instead of offering specific product endorsements, I would like to offer to you some concepts when it comes to care of the finished surface to help you understand your options and separate good advice from the chaff.

The steps needed for any particular vehicle, and thus the products/methods chosen, will depend in large part upon the starting condition of the finish (paint/gelcoat/thermoplastic/whatever).

The better the surface is to start with, the fewer number of actions needed. The worse the surface, the more work and the more actions/products needed.

If your surface is already shiny and in good condition, then the only thing needed is a good cleaning and application of surface protectant (pure carnuba wax, etc.).

If your surface is dulled (either a little or a lot), then restoring the shine will involve the use of products with abrasive qualities. Keep in mind that "abrasive" is the adjective form of "abrasion", which translates to "make your paint thinner by grinding off the top surface of it". The trick is to match up the products and methods with the starting surface condition so that the desired result is pleasing and still only minimally impacts the mils (a unit of measurement commonly used to describe paint thickness - each mil corresponds to 0.001"). In plain English - you want to keep that paint as thick as possible by only removing the absolute minimum you have to in order to restore the shiny surface finish. Abrasion is applied starting with the most aggressive or coarse and progressing through to very fine, bringing up the shine along the way.

Making dull paint shiny involves grinding it with ever-finer abrasives until it's glossy. Even vehicles that have been buffed to a very high gloss will show under magnification extremely fine scratches in the surface. The fineness of those scratches (at a microscopic level) will match the gloss obtained. Simple concept, no?

If your surface is only very slightly dulled, then you might be able to get away with a combination cleaner/wax. The pro of this is that it's completed in a single application, thus saving your elbow grease. The con is that it's a compromise - the product is neither a true wax nor a true compounding agent, yielding kind of a middling result.

For surfaces of moderate or significant dullness a multi-step process is called for. Note that between each step a VERY thorough cleaning is called for to remove traces of the previous product. You don't want your polishing, for instance, to pick up the coarse abrasive left over from compounding. Failure to do this could negatively impact your end result, and who wants to have a crappy end result from hours of work?

You would start with a compounding (or "cutting") agent on an appropriate medium, such as a cutting pad on a rotary or dual-action polisher (by hand is possible, too, but on a motor home you'd be insane or very fit to pursue this method due to time and exhaustion). This is the most aggressive thing you can start with short of sandpaper (I'll come back to this tantalizing statement in a bit). Care should be taken when using powered polishers not to "burn" the paint, especially around edges and definition lines (some people call these "creases", such as the line along the top of your fenders or the hood creases). It's very, very easy to grind right through your paint on the high points of your surface. The only remedy for that is new paint.

After compounding (and cleaning!), you would progress to a polishing agent. This is, in effect, simply a finer abrasive. You will also USE A DIFFERENT POLISHING PAD. This pad will be of a different material and crucially will not have remnants of another/coarser compounding agent on it.

After you have completed these two steps (and washing the beans out of it again) you would finally apply a surface protectant such as carnuba wax or your product of choice.

I'm only going to mention this last bit in the interest of being thorough. On occasion I've gotten to address severely degraded paint. In those cases I started not with compound but with extremely fine wet sandpaper (like 2000 grit or 10-micron). If you do not have experience using these products I strongly recommend that you do not get your initial start on something you care about, such as the surface of your expensive motor home. After using this sandpaper for the initial "cut" I then proceeded to use the compound, polish, wax method described above.

Also, I would be remiss not to mention what will happen to your buffing and polishing pads as you use them. They do something called "loading up". This means they get all gunked up with the abrasive and fine particles of the painted surface. You will periodically (usually every few minutes) need to "spur" the surface to dislodge this material from the pad and restore the desired cutting/polishing properties. Sort of scraping the gunk off, if you will. There are specific products made that literally look like handheld horse spurs you can use to dislodge this gunked-up material.

Some previous posts in this thread have referenced the website for AutoGeek. That site contains a great diagram generally describing what I have written above to aid you in visualizing the steps. That diagram is here:



Best of luck, and share before/after photos!
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