Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Class A Motorhome Discussions
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-25-2013, 09:51 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Algoma's Avatar


 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Charleston, WV
Posts: 2,640
Yes you can remove a tire yourself but as stated you need the right tools. You raise the coach on the jacks to take most of the weight off the wheels. You then use a bottle jack under the axle to get the tire off the ground. Then with a 6:1 torque multiplier and a 3/4" 33mm socket and breaker bar you remove the lug nuts. Now your problem is how are you going to get that tire that weighs 150 lbs in to whatever you have to take it to the tire shop.
When you tighten the lug not use a torque wrench set to 80 lb/ft and with the 6:1 multiplier that will give you 480 lb/ft at the nut.
I have removed all 6 of my wheels in the past year to replace brake calipers so the above is not theoretical.
__________________

__________________
John and Mary Knight
2015 Newmar Ventana 4311 - wheelchair accessible
2015 Cadillac SRX Luxury AWD
Algoma is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-25-2013, 10:38 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
tuffr2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Palm Coast Florida
Posts: 2,458
When I was 30 years old I would tackle any issue. Not so much anymore. I would say if you plan to do other things like the other tires or brakes or other chassis repairs/modifications then get the correct tools and go for it. It would be good experience. This time might take 4 hours. But the next time will only take an hour.

If this one instance is all you are planning let a mobile tire company do it. I think Love's is one truck stop that has trucks.

Torque - 90 ft lbs is what I can do w/o a breaker bar. I never used a multiplier - sounds like a must have tool.

Good luck
__________________

__________________
tuffr2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 11:12 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
CountryFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Between the Oceans
Posts: 3,550
Blog Entries: 2
When i had my tires mounted in a tire shop, i saw they were using a big hydraulic jack, similar to one used in mechanic shop except bigger.
__________________
2000 Country Coach Intrigue 40', ISC 350
2014 Ford C-Max Energi
CountryFit is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 11:17 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: somewhere in the west
Posts: 1,168
I have done just what you (the original poster) ask about, and with the benefit of a four foot cheater bar, removal and installation is a breeze. That is if the lug nuts are torqued to 500 ft/lbs.

Use a "run up block" to raise the appropriate corner by driving up on it, with the block only under the inner duel of course. Use a quality breaker bar and 1.5 inch socket and extension with the pivot point supported with a car jack, and the cheater bar over the breaker bar, and remove nuts.

The trick not is to not let the tire/wheel to lay down flat so that you have to lift it from that position, upon removal just roll it to the tail gate of a pickup, and with a length of 2X4 under the tire it is easy to lift into the bed if using the 2X4 properly.

Upon return from the tire shop, use a garden rake to hook onto the far side of the repaired tire and pull, you will find this a very convenient way to remove the tire but be sure to let the tire fall in an upright manner so as to roll it to the RV.

Once ready to position the wheel on the nuts, use a 2X4 and a crow bar to lift the tire into position, no heavy lifting.

Torquing is easy, even to 500 ft/lbs. Remember that torquing was being done way before the invention of the torque wrench. Just divide 500 by your weight, and the answer is the length of a bar to reach 500 ft/lbs. For example, say you weight 150 lbs. 500 divided by 150 comes out to 3.3, so when ready to torque the nuts, put your hands 3.3 feet (about 3 feet 4 inches) from the pivot point, and push down on the cheater bar till you are brought up on your toes, any you are at 500 ft/lbs.

All the heavy work has been intelligently, so no heavy lifting was required!

Archimedes said that if he had a long enough lever, and a place to stand, he could lift the world (or something like that).

Soooooo, I say go for it!

Ed

P.S. Look for a "Ken Tool" at your local auto/truck parts store.
__________________
Ed-Sommers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 11:18 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar
 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 16,263
With the weights and torques you'd encounter, I'd rather let someone else do it, and this is from a religiously DIYer! I'd want at minimum a 12 ton bottle jack and 12 ton jack stands. With lug nuts tightened to upwards of 500 lbs of torque, a 'cheap' torque multiplier will cost over $200 at Northern Tool. A jack and jack stands to handle the weights you'll require will be another $150 or more. I'd rather pay for roadside service.
Trying to drive on one flat dual could result in a blowout that could take out your fiberglass panels or a storage compartment. Not something I'd wish to risk.
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 12:15 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
R2Home's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Palmer Ak
Posts: 1,124
I have done my own tire removed at the house. Had a bad valve stem leak over the winter as could not get enough air pressure out of the 'old' air compressor to refill it. Road service was out of the question so....
With a 12 ton bottle jack, lug wrench and cheater bar, went to work. Once I had the tire off the ground I put some blocking under the axle. Side note, do NOT forget to block all of the other tires!!! Got the lug nuts broke loose and then I was able to use my air tools to take the tire off. I took it to our shop where we have plenty of air (2-150 psi air compressors with about 300 gallon tank) to refill it. Brought it back home and reinstalled the tire.
I have most of what is needed to remove a tire on the MH all of the time. There have been time in the past that I have gotten a rock stuck between the duals and the only way to remove it was to loosen one tire. A lot of places we camp are 'out of the way' places and it would take road service hours to get to us, if they could even find us.
__________________
2009 38' Diplomat
CSM- retired, wife as co-pilot
Reka & Ali providing security (our 2 labs)
R2Home is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 01:17 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
baloo's Avatar
 
Thor Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Louisville area
Posts: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed-Sommers View Post
I have done just what you (the original poster) ask about, and with the benefit of a four foot cheater bar, removal and installation is a breeze. .
Quote:
Originally Posted by R2Home View Post
I have done my own tire removed at the house. Had a bad valve stem leak over the winter as could not get enough air pressure out of the 'old' air compressor to refill it. Road service was out of the question so....
Ed and CSM,
Great stories. Now that's how the Renaissance men do it, and I can imagine that I might get in that situation in the future. (I remember installing an electric fuel pump on my old '65 Dodge on the side of I95, with only a screwdriver and vice grips and a knife -- using a roadside nail and rock to punch holes for the bolts.)(It's also why I carried 20lbs of tools on my Harley when I toured Europe in 76.)

I'll have to stockpile the tools/blocks, etc. and start lugging them around for the inevitable day.

HOWEVER, this time, I'm calling Roadside!
__________________
baloo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 02:03 PM   #22
Member
 
ChazA's Avatar
 
Nor'easters Club
Fleetwood Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by BFlinn181 View Post
With the weights and torques you'd encounter, I'd rather let someone else do it, and this is from a religiously DIYer! I'd want at minimum a 12 ton bottle jack and 12 ton jack stands. With lug nuts tightened to upwards of 500 lbs of torque, a 'cheap' torque multiplier will cost over $200 at Northern Tool. A jack and jack stands to handle the weights you'll require will be another $150 or more. I'd rather pay for roadside service.
Trying to drive on one flat dual could result in a blowout that could take out your fiberglass panels or a storage compartment. Not something I'd wish to risk.
Just to add to what Bob said (regular DIYer here too), we are assuming with many of these posts that the wheel comes off nicely. Since many of our RVs sit for a lot of the time and are not driven daily, the lug nuts may not come off easily? What do you do if a thimble is frozen to the rim? Do you have a spare one (there are many types/lengths for Alum/Steel rims, etc..)? Do you have a grinder wheel to cut off if needed, maybe a torch, etc...? Do you have the special tool to take off the chrome lugnut caps (cheap..only $10)? What happens if you break the stud, or strip the nut?

If you ask why I mention, been there done that with the thimble...well roadside did as I watched
__________________
Chas
'98 Fleetwood American Tradition 40' Diesel Pusher
Good Sam Life Member
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ChazA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 02:34 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
topdownman's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 1,462
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChazA View Post
If you ask why I mention, been there done that with the thimble...well roadside did as I watched
Okay, inquiring minds want to know, what is a thimble? I'm thinking this is something I should know.
__________________
Mark Anderson - FMCA 351514 - Louisville, KY
2011 Tiffin Phaeton 40QTH - Freightliner / Cummins
2006 Jeep Commander
Cricket SW3 Personal Transporter
topdownman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 02:44 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
BFlinn181's Avatar
 
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 16,263
The thimble is the custom nut that holds the inner wheel on the axle. They not only hold the inner wheel, but also usually are the spacer for the outer wheel and outer lug nut. They are a different size than the outer lug nut and need a deep socket to remove and replace.
__________________

Bob & Donna
'98 Gulf Stream Sun Voyager DP being pushed by a '00 Beetle TDI
BFlinn181 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 02:58 PM   #25
Member
 
ZackMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 77
May I suggest you take the coach to a reputable tire shop and have them to take care of this matter for you. If you decide to tackle this job, be extraordinarily careful. There is alot of weight to consider here.

__________________
ZackMan & Wife
2007 Monaco Executive
ZackMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 03:30 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,829
How I did it: (Thus proving it might be possible) Read notes at end.

I have a 12 ton jack jack, That is an air over hydraulic bottle jack (I call it a jack jack because this unit can be operated either with a lever, like any other bottle jack or with an air hose, the air hose operates a pistion much like the one in a jack hammer that, instead of powering a punch or chisel (Like the jack hammer) runs a hydrauilc pump (like the lever does).. I put it under the spring bracket, centered on the axle,, Made sure the tire on the other side was chalked both front and rear and then put the air to it.

I then unhooked the air hose from the jack and hooked it to my air powered impact wrench. I suggest a 3/4" (Mine is a 1/2 and it JUST barley did the trick)

You do not want to lift the tire too far, Just far enough that you can slide it out.

Now;;; Why I say you MIGHT.. i'm 6'3" by over 300 pounds, Every time we set up or take down I load/unload my wife's scooter, all 250 pounds of it, by simply picking it up off the tray and setting it on the ground.

I hope never again to lift a 22.5" tire into a pick up truck.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 05:36 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 15
Just a little point to throw into the mix, as an ex HGV truck driver in the UK we had to change our own tyres as the company wouldn't pay for roadside assistance. Once that tyre falls flat on the ground it is there forever unless you are built like Arnold Schwarzenegger ! If we fitted a spare which was new to a pair where the other was well worn it would rub off all of the tread on the worn tyre within 200 miles due to the difference in the diameters of the two tyres.

Richard.
__________________
Richard and Hazel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2013, 06:28 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
SNAPPY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 130
If you can drive the coach to the tire shop it would save you TONS of $$$. Roadside Assistance is expensive. Where do you think the term "highway robbery" came from?

My experience last weekend. We live in North Texas and were traveling to New Orleans. At around 8PM and about 45 miles from our destination our outside right rear tire blew out. I limped it about 6 miles to a small truck stop. and called half a dozen truck shops. Only two had the correct tire and each wanted almost $1000 for the tire. They also wanted $100/hr, including drive time both ways. We were about an hour from them. That's an hour to us, an hour back and an hour to do the work. That's $300 in labor. They also charge $1.50/mile. Again, both ways. That's another $150 in mileage. Total, with tax was about $1500. I asked the clerk that was working at the truck stop if they used anybody specific. She handed me a guys card. Ed's Tire service. I bought a very, VERY lightly used tire that was close to what we had. Plenty good enough to get us the 45 miles there and the whole way home. Total....$500. And he didn't even pull the wheel off. Jacked it up, pulled the old tire off, installed the new one and was done in about 30 minutes. Called a local tire shop Monday and found a new tire for $650 + $30 to mount. I'll drive the MH to them and save about $1000. I'd suggest you do the same.
__________________

__________________
2008 Damon Tuscany 4072
Success is having what you want.
Happiness is wanting what you have.
SNAPPY is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.