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Old 09-24-2015, 06:39 PM   #29
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I have a Norcold four door unit. I took the motorhome out to the semi local state park the other day when a campsite became available. I did a quick level job which wasn't probably much better than just leaving it alone. Anyway, the refrigerator was popping the GFI. The local repair guys told me to replace the GFI. I will do that when I get to the campground this afternoon. In the meantime, I did a more through job of leveling. Question is, is the unit being out of level a possible cause of the GFI tripping?

That is most generally an indication that the electric heating element has gone bad and is shorting to its metal housing. A quick test is to disconnect the element (two black wires to the control board) and see if it still trips the GFCI.


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Old 09-24-2015, 08:56 PM   #30
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Yup...gfi is telling you that you have an issue that needs repair and it refuses to risk your safety until fixed.
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Old 09-25-2015, 04:38 PM   #31
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You can also use your meter check for voltage or current in the ground wire. If there is any at all, then the GFCI was just doing its job the way it is supposed to. "Working as designed", they call it.
I'm curious as to how you would do this.
How can you check for current and/or voltage through a grounded ground wire?

Can't check for voltage with the circuit powered up as you'd get 120vac- fairly pointless.

Can't check for current across those same two points with the circuit live or you'll need a new meter.

The only test you can make with the circuit powered down is resistance as no volts/no amps with no power.

Bob
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Old 09-25-2015, 05:35 PM   #32
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Refer tripping GFI

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I'm curious as to how you would do this.

How can you check for current and/or voltage through a grounded ground wire?



Can't check for voltage with the circuit powered up as you'd get 120vac- fairly pointless.



Can't check for current across those same two points with the circuit live or you'll need a new meter.



The only test you can make with the circuit powered down is resistance as no volts/no amps with no power.



Bob

A GFCI outlet does not check for voltage or current on the ground wire. It simply checks that the current on the hot lead is the same on the neutral lead. If not than the current is leaking somewhere. The leakage could be in the sink to the water.


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Old 09-25-2015, 05:51 PM   #33
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If the current being used does not match the current being returned(via the neutral) then it has to be draining to ground somewhere.

Air does not conduct electricity ,the ground does.

That makes a properly grounded ground wire a valid test point to check for leakage(ohms) between the load side hot wire and the ground wire .

I wasn't explaining how a gfci device works.

I was explaining how to test the circuit to see whether you actually have a leakage problem or just a faulty gfci.

Bob
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Old 09-25-2015, 07:31 PM   #34
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I would start my search by checking how many recepticles and appliances are affected by the tripped gfi. Next if it is a recepticle mounted gfi I would diconnect the downstream wire from the back of the gfi . Power that circuit back up and see if it trips, no load,if not see if it trips with a load directly in the gfi., hair dryer or some plug in load. This will tell you if the proplem is the gfi or a downstream fault, and if you inventoried the circuit you now have a check list to follow. Good luck.
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Old 09-26-2015, 08:24 AM   #35
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You can also use your meter check for voltage or current in the ground wire. If there is any at all, then the GFCI was just doing its job the way it is supposed to. "Working as designed", they call it.

I've never been able to comprehend why people are so ready to blame a GFCI trip on a faulty GFCI instead of an actual ground fault? Sure, any device can fail, but is it so hard believe that it might also be telling the truth? I chalk it up to ignorance of what a ground fault really is, and why we have GFCI's in the first place.
+1 on "why people are so ready to blame a GFCI trip on a faulty GFCI".
My DW opened the fridge door and a bottle of white wine fell on the ceramic floor and broke. We quickly mopped up the disaster but some of the liquid found its way to the labyrinth of wires below the floor and the next morning I noticed a GFCI trip near where the accident occurred. It would trip a few seconds after resetting. Not connecting the two events, I went and purchased a new GFCI outlet and installed it. It worked. By then my slow little gray cells had put the two events together and I reinstalled the old GFCI outlet. And it worked. The liquid had dried around the place where it caused the short. So it was indeed NOT a bad GFCI.
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Old 09-26-2015, 03:59 PM   #36
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If the current being used does not match the current being returned(via the neutral) then it has to be draining to ground somewhere.



Air does not conduct electricity ,the ground does.



That makes a properly grounded ground wire a valid test point to check for leakage(ohms) between the load side hot wire and the ground wire .



I wasn't explaining how a gfci device works.



I was explaining how to test the circuit to see whether you actually have a leakage problem or just a faulty gfci.



Bob

The leakage to ground does not necessarily have to be thru the ground wire. It can leak because of a short thru many paths.

As I indicated before, the most common is the fridges electric heating element is shorted to its mounting bracket. Second most common is the ice maker if you have one. Just unplug the fridge to test if that eliminates the problem.


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