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Old 06-23-2015, 04:15 PM   #29
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Just a clarification. The ply rating on tires is a throwback to the 1950s. A modern all steel commercial tire has 4-5 tread plies and one sidewall ply. The ply rating has nothing to do with the physical construction of the tire.


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Steve, I don't understand. How can they say it is a 16-ply tire if it isn't?
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Old 06-23-2015, 04:21 PM   #30
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They don't actually say it's a 16 ply tire. It says, "16 Ply Rated". In other words, it'll carry as much weight as the old 16 ply tires would.
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Old 06-23-2015, 04:26 PM   #31
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Steve, I don't understand. How can they say it is a 16-ply tire if it isn't?

Joe,

They don't say it's a 16 ply tire, they say 16 ply rating. This rating is determined by the load range of the tire. All 295/80R22.5 load range H tires will have the same ply rating. They started doing this years ago when load range became the standard way to rate the load carrying capacity of tires. If you look carefully at the sidewall of your new tires there will be a declaration of the ply construction in that tire. All steel construction radial tires will have 4 or 5 tread plies and one sidewall ply.


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Old 06-23-2015, 05:50 PM   #32
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Speaking of tires. What about air pressure? Any good links on what pressures we should be running? Is it better to err on the high end and sacrifice ride? How about when the summer temps are in the upper 90's?
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Old 06-23-2015, 06:11 PM   #33
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new tires

Went thru same issue and purchased 6 Samson 275/70 22.5 tires for $2000 including balance beads for all and so far I am very happy with them vs the $775 each for Michelin Everyone has to make their own decision. Currently running at 110 pounds and ride is great.
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Old 06-23-2015, 06:31 PM   #34
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Toyo tire odor

If you happen to decide on Toyo's, be aware some of them come with a "black tank" odor, we put 4 on the rear of our Journey a year ago and they still have some smell, not pleasant when sitting out under the awning. Sure to get plenty comments from some who have not had this issue, but we did, do a search for Toyo tire smell, you'll find other folks had the same issue. no more Toyo's for us
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Old 06-23-2015, 08:01 PM   #35
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I put a front set of Sumitomos on my coach several months ago. So far im very happy with them. I don't buy into the high dollar Michelin is the only good tire bandwagon.

I had the opportunity to go with Samsons at considerably cheaper price. In hindsight I should have gone with the Samsons. My last class A had Vesta tires, a chinese brand. They gave me 8 good years of service with no issues.

Do your research, buy what is best for you. There is lots of info out there.
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Old 06-23-2015, 09:56 PM   #36
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I put the Sailun 255/70/22.5 H tires on my motorhome with counteract beads. They run very smooth. They don't "feel" any different than the Michelins they replaced. There are a lot of trucks running Sailuns with good results. I'm sure it's happened but I've never found anyone that spent the money to replace Toyos, Yokohamas, Hankooks, Sailuns, Samsons, etc. with Michelins because they were demonstrably worth the price.

I just replaced some E rated tires on a brand new Toy Hauler with Sailun's. The Sailun's probably weigh twice as much.

On motorhomes, I've always gone Goodyear or Michelin. And I've always looked down on tires out of China, but feedback on the Sailun's for 5ers had me convinced. I'd consider a set of Sailuns for a MH for sure. The only thing that is suspect in my mind is that they *might* not balance out as well as an American tire.... But I'd definitely give them a run.

Sailun's are not the same as most of the China products..
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Old 06-24-2015, 07:42 AM   #37
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cb1000rider,
you state that "Sailun's are not the same as most of the China products.." Can you comment more on that statement ? I am curious as I have a motorhome that came equipped with Sailun's and I got a lot of negative feedback when I made an inquiry about them. I've only put about 2500 miles on the coach but have had no issues and feel that the ride is quite acceptable. Thanks, Pat.
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Old 06-24-2015, 08:24 AM   #38
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Speaking of tires. What about air pressure? Any good links on what pressures we should be running? Is it better to err on the high end and sacrifice ride? How about when the summer temps are in the upper 90's?
It's all about the weight of your vehicle and important to know what that is on each tire point (4 corners). Each tire manufacturer usually has their own table to advise what inflation pressure is required for the weight it has to carry. It will give you a max. inflation pressure. You can adjust for comfort and ride. Your vehicle plate by your drivers seat shows recommended pressures that should be taken into account and will advise proper tire size designed for your coach.

Weighing your coach is important for several reasons. Knowing your total weight tells you if you are in range for what your chassis is designed to carry. Knowing your individual weight at each tire point tells you if you have balanced weight and need to adjust your storage arrangement for equal weight distribution as well as what Load Range tire is required. Knowing your combined weight of front and rear will let you know what your inflation pressure needs to be for front and rear tires.

Here is an example of my coaches tire chart for my Hancook AH12's.
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Old 06-24-2015, 08:37 AM   #39
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cb1000rider,
you state that "Sailun's are not the same as most of the China products.." Can you comment more on that statement ? I am curious as I have a motorhome that came equipped with Sailun's and I got a lot of negative feedback when I made an inquiry about them. I've only put about 2500 miles on the coach but have had no issues and feel that the ride is quite acceptable. Thanks, Pat.
My understanding is that they have a higher certification standard on the manufacturing process - I can't find the name of the certification currently.

What I can tell you is that they have good feedback within the 5th wheel community. The difference between MH and 5th wheel application may be that many 5ers are typically equipped with load range E tires and the Sailuns are G. MHs, especially pushers, probably start at G... You won't find a better tire than the Michelin - so it may be less of an upgrade if you have a DP.

What I can tell you personally is that they weighed 61lbs each in a 16" tire, that's probably twice what the OEM (Trailer King) tires weighed when I removed them.

One place I start when researching tires is looking at NTHSA complaints. Lots of complaints on ST tires out of China.. Lots. But the Sailun brand isn't even listed in the DB. I assume that means low or non-existant complaints. See: http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/owners/SearchSafetyIssues


I think people are right to complain about tires from China. Just make sure the complaint isn't generic and they know something about this brand in particular.
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Old 06-24-2015, 08:41 AM   #40
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It's all about the weight of your vehicle and important to know what that is on each tire point (4 corners). Each tire manufacturer usually has their own table to advise what inflation pressure is required for the weight it has to carry. It will give you a max. inflation pressure. You can adjust for comfort and ride. Your vehicle plate by your drivers seat shows recommended pressures that should be taken into account and will advise proper tire size designed for your coach.

Weighing your coach is important for several reasons. Knowing your total weight tells you if you are in range for what your chassis is designed to carry. Knowing your individual weight at each tire point tells you if you have balanced weight and need to adjust your storage arrangement for equal weight distribution as well as what Load Range tire is required. Knowing your combined weight of front and rear will let you know what your inflation pressure needs to be for front and rear tires.

Here is an example of my coaches tire chart for my Hancook AH12's.
Les..
How do you like your Hankooks? They are one of the tires I am considering.. If I can find a stocking dealer near here.. You using them in all positions?
Had my coach 4 corner weighed and ride height set and aligned when at Spartan a month or so ago.. I was running about 15 ils high on pressure compaired to actual weights.. Made a huge difference..
I am about to replace the 4 year old cracking Michilens that they say are "cosmetic" cracks.. Make me nervous..
Ron
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Old 06-24-2015, 09:04 AM   #41
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I love my Hancook AH12's. They ride well and track well.
I wasn't sure about them until I researched them before purchase. I couldn't find much for complaints at all. Many of the guys in the Beaver Club I belong to have purchased them with the same opinion.

I've always been a proponent of a good tire at a reasonable cost. Not because I'm cheap, but because as I stated previously, I don't believe higher cost necessarily means better tire. By that I'm referring to Michelin and Good Year. My research turned up tons of complaints on those two brands.

Having bought 5 sets of tires already in 5 years (5 different coaches) I feel comfortable in my research and choices. I was set on Toyo's M154's on the last few sets I've bought, but am happy to add the Hancook AH12's to my list. Also happy it knocked $600 off the total tire purchase for my rigs.

I'll put them on the next coach without hesitation!
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Old 06-24-2015, 09:06 AM   #42
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Not everything from China is of acceptable quality. Our Competitors use Chinese wheel gear boxes on their center pivot irrigation systems. They claim to be just as good as ours which are made in the USA. Actual controlled independent testing shows differently, but the claim is still there and they are cheaper. Their quality control is not up to the US standards. We had tried several different trailer tires on our implement trailers. We could wear some out, but others would blow out with 50% of the tread remaining. Both purchased at the same time. Was it due to poor quality control??? We finally went to a Good Year commercial trailer tire and no more blowouts. In our experience, the Chinese brands cannot compare. These two examples have convinced me that I will stick with Michelin or Good Year quality. I have only purchased one new set of tires for the MH. They were G670 GY and no issues after six years when I traded the coach. The cost difference of $200 per tire for a quality tire over 7-8 years is only $25/year/tire, or only $ .0005 per mile. In my case with eight tires, it amounts to $200/year or 4/100 of a penny per mile. My experience with Chinese products is by no means scientific, but it has convinced me that peace of mind is worth far more than the insignificant price difference I pay for tires.
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