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Old 06-21-2013, 02:32 PM   #1
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Retread Tires

Believe me I don't want any retread tires on my coach, but what is the deal with these Big Trucks and Retread Tires. You can't drive down any highway without seeing and running over chunks of these things that have come off of these Big Trucks. Some times its the entire thread portion all the way around laying right there in the middle of the lane. I can just imagine the damage and potential blowout and wrecks that occur when someone runs over these huge pieces of rubber. Obviously the trucking industry is trying to save money by using Retread Tires but by the looks of the failures laying on and on the side of highways they do fail at a high rate. Are there any regulation on these. The other problem is that no one is going along and picking this stuff up and removing it from the lanes of traffic. It just lays there until enough cars and trucks run over it and it is eventually forced to the side of the road. On my way back from Beaumont TX on I-10 today to Houston TX, not in my motor home thank God, you could not go hardly any distance without running across these rubber land mines. Does this make since that there is no real control on the use of retread tires in the trucking industry. It scares me to think about coming up on one of these large chunks of rubber going 60 MPH and no way to avoid hitting it and then have this this thing pass underneath the motor home and my tow car. It has not happened to me yet, but it could at any time. Drive safe my friends.
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Old 06-21-2013, 04:22 PM   #2
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They only use them on the trailer. I have run over these alligators on the road in two motorhomes and both times it damaged things. One time I was following a truck in my car when the trailer rear tire came apart. Nobody behind me so I hit the brakes. What is really bad is some (not all) will keep on driving letting the tire totally come off the wheel so they don't have to stop until the next truck stop. I agree that some are big enough on the road to do serious damage.
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Old 06-21-2013, 04:27 PM   #3
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They only use them on the trailer. I have run over these alligators on the road in two motorhomes and both times it damaged things. One time I was following a truck in my car when the trailer rear tire came apart. Nobody behind me so I hit the brakes. What is really bad is some (not all) will keep on driving letting the tire totally come off the wheel so they don't have to stop until the next truck stop. I agree that some are big enough on the road to do serious damage.
On the trailer portion its "out of sight out of mind" Let someone else deal with it.

That's to bad.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:51 PM   #4
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Many comments have been made on this subject on the various RV forums. Research the archives and you'll get a wealth of information, much of it based on emotion and a lot of trucking industry experience and attempts to explain and educate. Unfortunately, the emotion laden comments usually dominate. Retread tires are not legal for use on the steer axle but are legal in the drive and trailer positions. I have used recaps extensively in the drive and trailer positions and experienced the gamut with them. A sound casing properly inspected and capped by a reputable recap shop is paramount. Proper inflation and maintenance after that is critical. Most failures, recaps and non caps are the result of low inflation and overloading or a combination of both. If you see any steel cord in the 'alligator' on the road, that is from a tire casing that failed, the cap does not have steel cord in it. That 'alligator' with the steel cord could be a recapped tire, it could also be from an uncapped tire.
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:44 AM   #5
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Many comments have been made on this subject on the various RV forums. Research the archives and you'll get a wealth of information, much of it based on emotion and a lot of trucking industry experience and attempts to explain and educate. Unfortunately, the emotion laden comments usually dominate. Retread tires are not legal for use on the steer axle but are legal in the drive and trailer positions. I have used recaps extensively in the drive and trailer positions and experienced the gamut with them. A sound casing properly inspected and capped by a reputable recap shop is paramount. Proper inflation and maintenance after that is critical. Most failures, recaps and non caps are the result of low inflation and overloading or a combination of both. If you see any steel cord in the 'alligator' on the road, that is from a tire casing that failed, the cap does not have steel cord in it. That 'alligator' with the steel cord could be a recapped tire, it could also be from an uncapped tire.
I am not interested in researching this at all and my comments are not based on emotion. Retread tire failures on big trucks are a real danger to anyone driving on the highways regardless what you are driving. The trucking industry has the clout to get by with this practice without any responsibility of the outcome. It is left up to those who suffer damage or injury as the result of these retread failures to pay the price. The trucking industry reaps the financial gains of using these cheap inferior tires without even the obligation to pick up the debris left behind that liter the highways.
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:02 AM   #6
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I have been in the trucking industry for over 40 years. No emotions here. Retreads should be outlawed from the road, plain and simply. They are very dangerous and people have been killed from accidents caused by them. I would not run retread tires if they were offered for free, on any of my equipment. We never throw the tread off of virgin tires. It just doesn't happen. Those gators littering our roads from coast to coast are almost all retreads. Sad, but true.
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:45 AM   #7
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What can I say. I attempted to offer some objective information for consideration. Next time you are out and about on the highways and byways, count the numbers of tire carcases you see that came from cars, pickups, SUVs, utility trailers and travel trailers. Virtually none of them were recapped tires.

KSCRUDE, you never throw a tread from a virgin tire. You probably have a good tire pressure maintenance program and do not run overloaded or underinflated either.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:13 AM   #8
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What can I say. I attempted to offer some objective information for consideration. Next time you are out and about on the highways and byways, count the numbers of tire carcases you see that came from cars, pickups, SUVs, utility trailers and travel trailers. Virtually none of them were recapped tires.

KSCRUDE, you never throw a tread from a virgin tire. You probably have a good tire pressure maintenance program and do not run overloaded or underinflated either.
Fleetman you are dead on in the above and in your previous post where you said "emotion laden comments usually dominate". Kinda hard to "bite you tongue" sometimes, eh.

I don't believe there is any comprehension of the number of trucks that travel the highways when statements like "they do fail at a high rate" are thrown about.

Just because you don't see them (or don't care to see them) doesn't mean the crews aren't out there picking up tire and deer carcases.

Tire carcases (road alligators) are indeed a dangerous hazard, no question. Preventive measures like careful attention, sufficient and correct following distances go a look way toward mitigating these dangers.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:56 AM   #9
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What can I say. I attempted to offer some objective information for consideration. .
I'm sorry I must have missed the "objective information for consideration". Seems to me the only "emotion laden comments" are coming from those that approve the use of retreads by the trucking industry. Is it not a fact that the only reason retreads are used at all is because it provides a "cheaper" not just a lower cost but cheaper alternative than buying "virgin" tires. If not no one would be running on retreads and the retread alligators would disappear. I think we can live with the few and far between "tire carcases you see that came from cars, pickups, SUVs, utility trailers and travel trailers".

As we all have to stare these retread alligators down with no means to avoid hitting them at times it is very hard for me to find any justification for their use. But I am certainly a realist and know that they are not going to go away. That is just a fact that will not change no matter how much we would like for it to. That's all from me.
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Old 06-22-2013, 11:00 AM   #10
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I have been in the trucking industry for over 40 years. No emotions here. Retreads should be outlawed from the road, plain and simply. They are very dangerous and people have been killed from accidents caused by them. I would not run retread tires if they were offered for free, on any of my equipment. We never throw the tread off of virgin tires. It just doesn't happen. Those gators littering our roads from coast to coast are almost all retreads. Sad, but true.
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Old 06-23-2013, 12:59 PM   #11
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We often see these misunderstandings about retreaded tires and the causes of rubber on the road. The fact is, it's just as likely that the rubber you see on the road came from a new tire. Several State and Federal studies have looked at this issue and come to the same conclusions.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration published a study in 2008 (Commercial Medium Tire Debris Study - Report No: DOT HS 811 60) in which they collected almost 1,500 pieces of tire fragments from the roads. The study concluded that the fragments they found were from NEW and retreaded tires in equal proportion to their service on the roads and had almost nothing to do with the new tire manufacturing or retreading processes. The top 2 causes of damage they identified from the debris studied were the result of hitting road hazards (39%) and excessive heat on the tires (30%), often caused by underinflation, overloading or some other type of abuse. This study confirms findings of other studies done by the States of Arizona and Virginia looking at rubber on our roads.

Retreaded tires provide important economic and environmental benefits to all of us by significantly reducing the costs for our private and public fleets to operate their vehicles, by keeping millions of tires out of landfills annually, and by saving millions of gallons of oil, tons of steel, and reducing carbon emissions in the production process of retreading tires. Retreaded tires are used safely everyday on passenger vehicles, school buses, ambulances, fire trucks, and aircraft.

Finally, to correct one other myth stated here... retreaded tires can be legally used in the steer position on commercial trucks.

For more information please visit the Tire Retread & Repair Information Bureau at Tire Retread & Repair Information Bureau
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Old 06-23-2013, 01:31 PM   #12
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We often see these misunderstandings about retreaded tires and the causes of rubber on the road.

Finally, to correct one other myth stated here... retreaded tires can be legally used in the steer position on commercial trucks.
Retread Info, Thanks for posting that information. I stand corrected on the steer tire comment for commercial trucks, I reverted to my public transit experience where recaps are not permitted on the steer axle and did not consider other users.
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Old 06-23-2013, 01:48 PM   #13
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What can I say. I attempted to offer some objective information for consideration. Next time you are out and about on the highways and byways, count the numbers of tire carcases you see that came from cars, pickups, SUVs, utility trailers and travel trailers. Virtually none of them were recapped tires.

KSCRUDE, you never throw a tread from a virgin tire. You probably have a good tire pressure maintenance program and do not run overloaded or underinflated either.
I didn't think your comments were particularly directed to the OP, they were thoughtful and provided useful insights from actual experience. Incidentally, I have noticed that in the past 30 years the number of truck tires remnants I see has gone down significantly while traffic has increased.

Many lay people get the wrong end of a thing because they just don't know. For example the comment about drivers not caring and just carrying on down the road. Lets start with the fact that most drivers have no say whatsoever about what tires are on the trailer. They are responsible to check the tire pressures, load, and visual condition of their rig, but that can only catch an obvious problem.

If a tire fails on the trailer the chance that the driver will see it or even notice it are slim, so blaming the driver for continuing to drive is based on a misunderstanding. Last year I just missed a wheel and tire that came off a truck on the other side of the interstate - went across my front about 8 feet off the ground. Would have killed one of us if it had hit us. Couldn't tell if it was a retread!

Frankly, I am more than a little paranoid about bad and distracted passenger vehicle drivers, and road conditions.

Last year we came up on a U-Haul trailer being pulled through the Rockies on a wet dark night deep in the woods. No lights on the trailer and I nearly ran onto him. A clever guy in a pick up who thought I was driving too slow passed me (over 60 ft combined length) and didn't see the U-haul and spun out in front of me when he tried to cut in and suddenly the trailer was in his headlights.

Lots of excitement out there. Retreads are probably not high on my list of panic inducers.
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