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Old 03-09-2013, 04:09 PM   #15
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Agree with the above posters. Sounds like you checked tire pressures. Make sure your air bags are properly inflated, and ride height is correct. Then put a set of Koni FSD shocks on the coach. You won't be disappointed.
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Old 03-09-2013, 04:25 PM   #16
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It could be tire pressure,shocks,ride height, as previous post or it could just be the chassis. When we purchased our rev in 2008 when also test drove another new fleetwood not nameing don't want a war but it rode like a truck compared to the rev. You felt every bump on a concrete expressway that's why a long test drive is very, maybe one of the most important.
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:16 PM   #17
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The ride height valve and air bags need to be checked. I have a 2002 Fleetwood Revolution and it rides like a cloud. 2008 Honda Accord Toad. Best ride I have so something is not right with your air ride.
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:24 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by BirdDoggin View Post
Your Pace Arrow may have had a better ride than give it credit for, for a vehicle in that weight range the "old fashion" spring and shackle suspension was well suited. The air ride on the new to you DP can be adjusted to suit you, or more specifically the weight your normally carry. You don't mention on the trip home if you are loaded normally or just coming home empty (no water, food, grills , pot/pans, beer, clothes......) . so the suspension may be set by the previous owner for what they normally carry and your running with a lot less weight and the suspension is harsh now. There are ride height (pressure in air bags) adjustments for the air bags, and a slight adjustment will result in softer ride. I'm sure someone has the same chassis and can give you help on how to set the ride height.
There is no adjustment other than ride height, the pressure is the same, just more or less air allowed into the air bag by the ride height valve.
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Old 03-11-2013, 08:14 AM   #19
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There is no adjustment other than ride height, the pressure is the same, just more or less air allowed into the air bag by the ride height valve.
If you add more air (increase pressure) then you increase the ride height, decrease air (decrease air pressure) you lower the ride height. A 16th or 8th inch adjustment on the leveling valve will give quite a bit of change to the ride. The pressure is monitored and adjusted by the ride height valve, if there is an increased load the valve increases air pressure to inflate the bag to maintain ride height. If there is a beer sale and you load up the compartments on the passenger side behind the rear axle with your deal of the century, the air bags will invlate ( increase pressure) accordingly to level side to side and front to rear. The 2 rear air bags will be at different pressures because the load was not applied evenly, and the rear bags will be of much higher pressure than the front. An RV is about the only large vehicle on the road that does not apply it's loads evenly across the entire suspension to create a uniform ride, and the ride height valves must be adjusted for how that owner travels. Where you put your weight is just as important as how much you carry, and is also another way to adjust ride.
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Old 03-11-2013, 08:45 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdDoggin
If you add more air (increase pressure) then you increase the ride height, decrease air (decrease air pressure) you lower the ride height. A 16th or 8th inch adjustment on the leveling valve will give quite a bit of change to the ride. The pressure is monitored and adjusted by the ride height valve, if there is an increased load the valve increases air pressure to inflate the bag to maintain ride height. If there is a beer sale and you load up the compartments on the passenger side behind the rear axle with your deal of the century, the air bags will invlate ( increase pressure) accordingly to level side to side and front to rear. The 2 rear air bags will be at different pressures because the load was not applied evenly, and the rear bags will be of much higher pressure than the front. An RV is about the only large vehicle on the road that does not apply it's loads evenly across the entire suspension to create a uniform ride, and the ride height valves must be adjusted for how that owner travels. Where you put your weight is just as important as how much you carry, and is also another way to adjust ride.
Ride height is a specification set by the chassis builder and should not be altered. Yes, more weight in the motorhome will cause an increase in air bag pressure to support that weight. Increasing or decreasing the ride height will not increase or decrease the pressure in the bags. It will increase or decrease the volume of air in the air bags.
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Old 03-11-2013, 11:48 AM   #21
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Be sure your air dump switch is not on. This would prevent the air bags from inflating this creating a rough ride.

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Old 03-11-2013, 12:57 PM   #22
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What is a Tru-center? Why did you add it?
TrueCenter is a steering aide from Blue Ox.

Blue Ox - TruCenter

It won't do anything for the ride, just steering.
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Old 03-11-2013, 02:41 PM   #23
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Just to repeat
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_D
There is no adjustment other than ride height, the pressure is the same, just more or less air allowed into the air bag by the ride height valve.
because this come up quite often - as do the incorrect versions. The only time the air bag pressure changes is if it has to support more or less weight

I once drove two similar buses with similar loads on the same route which included a couple of speed bumps. The older one - leaf spring - went over the speed bumps as if they weren't there while the newer one - all air suspension - rocked and rolled and banged as if the rear end was going to fall out.

However, not all suspensions are created equal and my experience is that these motohomes built on basic truck platforms are very poorly specified.

I have an MC8 - 16 tons, tag axle - that glides along even on some of Australia's maxi-washboarded roads. It was, in its day, a luxury coach and it has running gear to match

I also have an Airstream - more than 20 years younger , and I'm told, not an entry level RV in its day- with essentially the same suspension (in pricipal) as the MCI and new shocks and it is the absolute pits on anything except glass-smooth pavement. Once a truck, always a truck and you can't dress up a truck just by putting a fancy body on it.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:07 AM   #24
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Tony Lee,

I believe why 2 identical chassis can ride so vastly different is weight distribution. No other vehicle manufacture puts so little emphasis on proper weight loading than the RV house builder, not the chassis builder, but the house builder that puts the majority of the weight in the rear and often times to one side. The rear closet filled with clothes, the refriderator filled with food, cupboards loaded with pots, pans, dishes, glasses cups ( I will get to water storage later, I am assuming they are empty at this point) All to one side and well rear of center, causing the rear suspension to have on air bag at an increased pressure compared to the other side. and the front air bags with very little air because all the weight is at the rear. The point can well proven in many of the tire pressure threads where people post huge differences in front to rear and side to side weights, as the say to set tire pressure (but are you increasing or decreasing volume?) as to the weight at the 4 corners. Now add in where the fresh, gray, and black water tanks are. Very few house builders place these tanks center mass on the RV, why? That is the best place to put a large load. Who drops the tail gate on their pick up and puts the load behind the rear axle? Yet the house builder often puts at least one of the tanks if not two behind the rear axle.

The end result is the leveling valves put vastly different air pressures in the 4 cornres of the RV to maintain a ground clearance level when the RV is stationary, which means the vehicle will sit level when stopped, but have horrible handling characteristics.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:45 AM   #25
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Ride height is a specification set by the chassis builder and should not be altered. Yes, more weight in the motorhome will cause an increase in air bag pressure to support that weight. Increasing or decreasing the ride height will not increase or decrease the pressure in the bags. It will increase or decrease the volume of air in the air bags.
I will have to disagree. That is like saying that increasing or decreaing tire pressure will not change the distance from the ground to the center of the wheel as you increase tire pressure. Obviously as you inflate a flat tire the ride height increases. Same with the air bag, let a little air out (decrease pressure) the bag shrinks and the ride height is lowered, in either case the load has not changed. The ride height is suggested by the manufacture much the same as tire pressures by tire manufactures, a slight difference +/- can have a big impact on ride comfort. If a manufactures suggest a ride height of 17", the owner finds it set at 17 1/8 ", he then readjusted to a level of 16 7/8". That slight difference in height may mean a difference of air pressure in the air bag that results in a better ride, much the same as a change in tire pressure has.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:04 AM   #26
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A tire has cords, even steel belts to maintain its size. An air bag is a rubber bladder, similar to a latex balloon. When setting ride height, that means the air bag has the proper volume and pressure of air, allowing the suspension proper clearance for handling road irregularities. Lowering the ride height makes the distance the suspension can travel before pinching, or bottoming out, causing a very hard jolt. Raising the ride height will allow too much distance between the axles and the frame, putting the shocks out of their optimum reaction range, misaligning the drive shaft, and increasing sway. I'd follow the manufacturer's recommendation on ride height.
If you must experiment, weight the coach and set tire pressures to match, then buy adjustable shocks and play with them.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:28 AM   #27
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Weigh your coach empty, then load it to what is required, and weigh it again. Compare the loads. You may be exceeding the limits, which is something you should know. Change shocks, and check ride height. Also check air bags for any leaks with foam. Arrange stuff so you manage your loads and not overload any area. There are so many things to do, but once completed you should be aware of the difference. Like mentioned no coach rides like being in a cloud.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:30 AM   #28
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I will have to disagree. That is like saying that increasing or decreaing tire pressure will not change the distance from the ground to the center of the wheel as you increase tire pressure. Obviously as you inflate a flat tire the ride height increases. Same with the air bag, let a little air out (decrease pressure) the bag shrinks and the ride height is lowered, in either case the load has not changed.
Probably some misunderstanding here. I assume we are talking about large class a vehicles with airbag suspension fitted with ride height valves and not about those vehicles fitted with airbags that are controlled solely by pressure adjustment.
A tyre is not an automatically controlled system but if it was, it would likely adjust the pressure to result in the same footprint on the road regardless of the load. Same height of the rim above the road might also achieve the same result.
On the first type of air suspension there is no operator adjustment possible. Ride height is the controlled parameter and it is all automatic and minor changes in ride height adjustment are not going to make much difference to the ride problems this topic started out describing.

The second type is not usually a stand-alone system and is often an add-on to assist overloaded conventional spring suspensions. Without ride-height control a solely airbag suspension would need manual adjustment every time the loading changed and that just wouldn't be practical.
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