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Old 03-18-2013, 01:37 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by 07KodiakDsl33 View Post
ok just got a quote for the Hutchinson CRF ...ouch... maybe we could pull together and get a group buy going if not I will at least have the fronts done for my own piece of mind and for the DW for when she is driving ...
How much?
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Old 03-19-2013, 06:15 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by cgarvey View Post
Just purchased Tyron run flat front tire protection. Had highspeed blow out (70mph) on right front Thursday on my 08 American Tradition. Traded and bought 13 Allegro Bus (tag) Wanted the added protection

Any thoughts...
I had them installed on my 2007 Bounder when we bought it - seemed like a good idea at the time, and it gave us a sense of security for these past 6 years. Then yesterday we got new tires installed - even with the provided tool, and the owner's manual with the dismounting/mounting instructions it took 2 guys almost an hour to get the band out of the first tire. I cannot imagine someone trying to work on a flat on the side of the road somewhere, so I told them to not bother reinstalling the things.

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Originally Posted by JohnBoyToo View Post
My question is,
will the steel rings SUPPORT the full weight of the bus and all the forces involved when a catastrophic blowout occurs?
The rings are meant to support the weight of the vehicle - they simply prevent the tire bead from dropping down into the middle of the wheel, causing the tire to roll off the wheel. The idea is that you're better off limping to the side of the road with some rubber between the rim and the road.

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Originally Posted by jmckinley View Post
Interesting concept. But I have a concern.

I looked at the installation instructions and I wonder how a non Tyron shop could change the tire. To get the tire off, the Tyron band has to be removed and that requires some means to push the inner bead against the outer bead and unbolting the band.

Without Tyron's special tool, I don't know how that could be done.
The tool they provide is only used to loosen/tighten the bolt that tightens the band on the wheel - you still have to compress the bead enough to get the tool into the bolt area, and then you have to get the band out of the tire without losing the rubber inserts placed all around the band, and hopefully not lose the tightening bolt. The instructions show locking the wheel/tire assembly onto the tire changing machine so you have enough leverage to compress the bead away from the band - if you're on the side of the road with some guy and a tire truck trying to replace your tire you won't be well-liked by that guy!
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Old 03-20-2013, 03:07 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Alan_Hepburn View Post

The tool they provide is only used to loosen/tighten the bolt that tightens the band on the wheel - you still have to compress the bead enough to get the tool into the bolt area, and then you have to get the band out of the tire without losing the rubber inserts placed all around the band, and hopefully not lose the tightening bolt. The instructions show locking the wheel/tire assembly onto the tire changing machine so you have enough leverage to compress the bead away from the band - if you're on the side of the road with some guy and a tire truck trying to replace your tire you won't be well-liked by that guy!
Searching on the web the company offers two tools. One that loosens the bolt and the second, a steering wheel shaped compression tool used to compress the tire and get at the band. Were they using the compression tool and still having a time of it?
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:44 AM   #32
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Maybe I'm just lucky. In 40 years of driving, I've never had a flat tire. Knock on wood. I always check my tire pressure and always have good tires. I change my tires every 4 years on all my vehicles weather they need it or not. People who run older tires are just hoping nothing happens. Of course a new tire can fail also. I'll take my chances with a new tire I guess. That's just me.
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:41 AM   #33
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Searching on the web the company offers two tools. One that loosens the bolt and the second, a steering wheel shaped compression tool used to compress the tire and get at the band. Were they using the compression tool and still having a time of it?
I had the tool for loosening the bolt, but I've never seen the compression tool before - looking at it, it might make the job a bit easier. I wonder if they came up with that tool recently because they found that large tires are pretty hard to work with without some help?

We ended up using a couple of long tire irons - getting the ends lodged underneath the band near the bolt and prying down to compress the tire; then we could get the bolt tool (basically an Allen wrench with a 1/2" drive) onto the bolt head. We removed the bolt completely then pulled the band out of the tool - most of the rubber bumpers came off as we pulled the band out. I told them they could mount the bands on their wall, or throw them away - I didn't want to have to deal with them if I ever had a flat on the side of the road out in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:17 PM   #34
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We went through the Goodyear G670 RV tire fiasco about 10 years ago and blew multiple tires until we replaced them with another brand. One was a right front with my wife driving 70mph on I-8 near Casa Grande. The main thing is not to panic! Do not to jam on the brakes or yank on the steering.

Firestone and Ford conducted a thorough rollover investigation several years ago. The root problem was under inflation, but the rollovers were caused by poor driver technique. They intentionally blew tires on a test Ford Explorer and the driver had to first jerk the steering one direction and then back the other while applying severe braking to roll the vehicle. I’m just not sure the Hutchison bands are necessary.
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Old 03-22-2013, 01:03 PM   #35
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Sorry, but to me this is the latest way to separate a man from his money. And at these thing's present price, it does it very quickly and well. Proper driver technique, and paying attention when driving, all the time, is a much bigger safety item than these bands. I've seen MANY blown tires on small and big wheels and very, very few separated carcass' from the wheel. Even then, proper driver technique was what prevented catastrophe, not a gimmick with a slick and scary promotion program. If you want to spend your money on something that's worth it, go to a nationally recognized driving school.
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Old 03-22-2013, 01:53 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Gorlininc View Post
Maybe I'm just lucky. In 40 years of driving, I've never had a flat tire. Knock on wood. I always check my tire pressure and always have good tires. I change my tires every 4 years on all my vehicles weather they need it or not. People who run older tires are just hoping nothing happens. Of course a new tire can fail also. I'll take my chances with a new tire I guess. That's just me.


Nothing to do with tire condition all about hitting road trash... In 30 years of Motorhome travel I have had three blow outs or mass air loss at highway speed. All incidents were something in the road, everything from big truck brake pads,piece of leaf springs,a broken Brake/disk drum, to name a few. One was a rear duel that had a inside tire fill extention that sheared off from something on the crown. I do not use those items also.

Chris
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Old 03-22-2013, 02:04 PM   #37
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Sorry, but to me this is the latest way to separate a man from his money. And at these thing's present price, it does it very quickly and well. Proper driver technique, and paying attention when driving, all the time, is a much bigger safety item than these bands. I've seen MANY blown tires on small and big wheels and very, very few separated carcass' from the wheel. Even then, proper driver technique was what prevented catastrophe, not a gimmick with a slick and scary promotion program. If you want to spend your money on something that's worth it, go to a nationally recognized driving school.

You dont ride on the bands, all the bands do keep the tire on the rim from colasping in the well. It gives the ability to steer and maintain control and drive to a safe location to pull over. My last blow out, tire or most of it although shredded stayed on rim... but coach was riding on rim hinse no turning or ability to steer.

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Old 03-23-2013, 12:41 AM   #38
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I looked into these and the dealer (Campers, RVs and Boats For Sale | The #1 RV and Boat Dealer in NC | Carolina Coach) was charging 450.00 per wheel installed on a class C. The problem is that to complete the install the TPMS sensors must be removed from the tires. While I like the idea of being able to get to a safe area to change a tire post blow out, I am not willing to lose the sensors and deal with a TPMS idiot light in my face 100% of the time driving down the road.
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Old 03-23-2013, 02:57 AM   #39
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When one has a blow out while driving an RV, many drivers make the mistake of reactively and immediately stepping on the brake or slowing down. The driver should step on the accelerator and once control of steering and going straight is regained, then slow down to the side of the road and stop.
Having added steering control like Safe T Plus is a benefit I appreciate.
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